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Full text of "73 Magazine (June 1991)"

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JUNE mi 

ISSUE §369 
USA $2, 95 
CAN $3*93 

A WGE Publication 
International Edition 



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Build a 
3-Band 
QRP Rig 




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DEUTSCHE5 REICH 



Beginners Guide to 
Parts Substitution 




Brass Pounder's 




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73 Reviews 

Swiss Log 

Software 




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Letters 



Number 1 on your Feedback card 



Tim P. Yoho WA3D, Lock Have* PA t 
read several letters in the Apnl issue con- 
cerning dissatisfaction with service from 
American manufacturers of radio prod* 

UCts 

I wish lo report a very positive experi- 
ence with a US, company, namely Heath . 
I built the Heath SB-1000 linear amplifier 
and had a problem with the output After 
much searching by myself and several 
other hams. I sent the unit back to the 
factory. The unit was returned several 
weeks later with a plate choke modifica* 
tion; it worked properly for a few days, then 
the original problem returned. 

I wrote Heath about the problem, and 
the service manager immediately re- 
sponded, requesting that l send back the 
unit. He Indicated that Heath would reim- 
burse me for the postage {which they 
promptly did), and give the unit priority 
treatment Two weeks later, it came back 
with an RF choke and 3-500Z replacement 
at no charge. The unit has worked welt 
since, and t am pleased with the attention 
and concern expressed by the service 
people at Heath 

James S. Waters W5YG. Houston TX 
Now that no-code is a reality . how about 
some "2 meter FM on a shoestring" like 
73 had years 390? Let's show poor college 
students that they can afford this hobby. 

Its a/ready in the works!, . . Biff WB8ELK 

Jim Kelly KK3K, Philadelphia PA \ en- 
joyed the April editorial as always. I 
Chuckled at your comments about giving 
basically the same pep talk each year. I 
enjoy it nevertheless, because it is one of 
the few indications that there is life still left 
in the hobbyl What a dull bunch we must 
seem to the uninitiated who stumble Into 
Hara and cannot even get a response from 
the hoards glued to their HTs. stooped 
over tables full of connectors. 

Ham radio's best kept secret is how 
much fun and how easy it is to work 
OSCAR. The sunspot cycle wilt soon stan 
to decline, and t asked our club members. 
" What wiH you do then? "I pointed out that 
OSCAR- 13 work is reliable, lull duplex 
not propagation-dependent, and requires 
small antennas, You can do satellite oper- 
ation tor the same amount of $ or less than 
HF tt offers plenty Of DX and rag-Chewing, 
is relet tveJy QRM and fid-free, and avail- 
able to ait hams with Technician class and 
above licenses It's a great opportunity for 
tun in ham radio for our new codeless 
Technicians! 

Doug Brock, Huron SO On March 2, I 
entered the Amateur Radio Service as a 
no-code Tech, and I'm proud of it, I had 
played with the idea of becoming a ham for 
about nine years, then about six monihs 
ago. \ decided to get serious about it. I was 
studying tor the Novice when the no-code 
class came up, so I grabbed a Tech book 
and went tor it. I encourage anyone think- 
ing about amateur radio to §0 ahead and 
go for it Gut don't stop. Keep going up the 
ladder, lam, 

As for guys like "N«" in the March is- 
sue , ignore him. There s always a few sour 
apples in the bunch, tf you're tired of ihe 



From the Hamshack 

garbage on 1 1 meters like l was. get out of 
there. Tne best of luck to anyone studying 
for that next test, tor any class license. 

Norns Garden, Shreveport LA I'm possi- 
bly the first of a group that some people 
fear will show up in mass and take over the 
precious ham bands I'm a no-code Tech. I 
passed the written tests with |u$t a little 
effort last February, To me, code was an 
unnecessary, and to some degree unrea- 
sonabfet way of communicating 

I'm a professional broadcaster, and IVe 
worked in radio as a DJ. newscaster, 
sports reporter, and program director, in 
TV, I've been a news photographer, re- 
porter, director, and now a producer. My 
words, spoken by myself or by others on 
the air, are heard by thousands and some- 
times millions of people. I musi be respon- 
sible for and careful with my words. I plan 
to use on the ham bands the same com- 
munication ethics and practices I have 
used as a professional broadcaster. 

Unless i and those around me who are 
interested m the new license are a nuke, 
most of the first wave of no-code Techs will 
be those who have always had a legitimate 
interest in the hobby, but who were put off 
by the code requirement. Many of us are 
already professionals in communications 
and electronics. The best way to guaran- 
tee no trash comes into the hobby is (0 not 
construct barriers at the entrance, but 
raiher to guide those who come to the door. 
Give us a chance and teach us your ways. 

Code does not a great radio operator 
make. Thanks to the FCC for gtvino, me an 
opportunity to get into the hobby, I'll see 
you soon on 6 meters and above hope- 
fully in a year, I'll see you on HF as a Gen- 
eral, then as an Advanced . but not with 

Say, it the code requirement were elimi- 
nated for aft license classes, perhaps we 
could have a super-duper theory test (tike 
1 00 fiH-in-the blank and essay questions— 
and no book with the answers in it, either!}, 
and on-the-air evaluation of proper operat- 
ing practices! . . Linda KA T UKM 

J«$On Kelly NOtCALL yet, Fort Dodge 
I A ft has finally happened! No code I have 
been monitoring radio communications 
for over three years. From the beginning, 
my main interest has been VHF * never 
did understand why a bunch of old men 
insisted that I learn the code when it is all 
but nonexistent in the bands above 30 
MHi I have passed the written portion of 
the Novice test, but have failed the code 
tesf three times! ft drives me crazy. H is 
hard for me to waste lime learning the 
code only to forget it after passing the test. 

Many hams feel that the nr>code Tech 
should not be allowed access to the 2 me- 
ter band. Why? They contend that the 
band is too crowded, and that there isn't 
room for "glorified CB operators/" 

Here in Iowa, I can monitor 20 repeaters 
all day without my scanner stopping more 
lhan three limes! When it does, It* s usually 
just some old man Kerch unking to see if 
the unexercised repeater can still hear his 
handi -talkie that hasn't been charged in 
five years Why should I become a ham? 
There are so few people willing to talk to 



some new kid under the age of 50. It has 
been many times that hams driving 
through the area check in on the local re- 
peater only to be ignored because the old 
men don't know who they are. 

Everything I have learned about 
amateur radio has been from 73 or Bon 
KF0LR. Ron deserves a medal of honor 
from hams trying to promote the hobby- 
He talks to anyone who might be interest- 
ed in ham radio. If it weren't for KFtLfi, 
ham radto would be dead in this communi- 
ty, Ron is why I would become a ham. He 
needs help promoting this great hobby 
He cannot possibly elmer everybody that 
is interested! 

Why doesn't the AfiRL want new hams 
in the hobby to have access 10 the 2 meter 
band? They certainly aren't using \\\ IT they 
don't, it will be taken away. Give it to the 
no-coders; we'll use it to promote ham ra- 
dio and get more people to join the hobby 
and make it great again! I'm ready for my 
test. See you on the repeaters I 

Frank Muratore KB2EZV, Copiague NY I 
would like to comment on an article. "Be- 
hold the Back Packet." In the December 
1 990 issue. Construction could have been 
simplified by using an electric knife 10 cut 
the foam. I have been using this technique 
for quite some time, and find lhat the foam 
cuts like butter. 

Adam Harrod, Montpelier VT I am an SW 
listener, and have been for the past 10 
years As I am not a ham, I cannot transmit 
to receive any 0$L cards Is there any way 
to receive ihem? 

Have cards made up for yourself with 
"SWL" printed on them instead of a 
calfsign. Send your cards out to stations 
you hear, and you can send them a sig- 
nal report. Request a QSL card in a*- 
change. . . . Joyce Sawtette 

Stephen Barnett. San Carlos CA Your 
editorials remind me of a book published 
about a man in the village of La Mancha, 
His name was Don Quixote, and if I re- 
member the story right, he liked to joust 
with windmills. Mr. Green, your windmill 
seems lo be the A RRL J keep read i ng y u r 
column with much interest, I am studying 
to become a Novice, and the more I can 
learn about what is happening in the hob- 
by; the belter Til be able to operate on the 
air. 

I have many questions. What good will 
the ARRL be to me when I get a I ■cense' 7 
How will the ARRL help me if I make an 
FCC error? Will the ARRL represent me in 
local, state, and federal government? How 
good are the ARRL publ nations'* Whai 
about a magazine geared to the beginner 
in ham radio? 

What can we do to advance, enhance, 
and expand amateur radio? Many people 
have lost life's challenge. You see school 
children "hanging out. young adults in 
cocktail bars, others sitting in front of the 
TV- 
While SWLing on 10 meters, I heard a 
man in the San Jose area, who regularly 
sets up a ham station at the Children's 
Museum and lets the children become 
third-party operators. Listening to the 
hams talking to the children was quite in- 
teresting. This ham is doing a lot on his 
own time to further ham radio. The hams 
he contacted were also doing ham radio a 
good turn. 

Enclosed is my subscription. I look for- 
ward to my first issue of your magazi ne so I 



ca n keep up wi th the man a nd h is wi n dm i II . 
The local ham store is sometimes sold out 
of 73. and now I will not miss out Your 
ideas are up front and needed, ihe wheel 
that squeaks gets the 



The magazine you're looking for is being 
started — Radio Fun. The premier issue 
wilt be out tn time lot Dayton. tt'U have 
simple theory, simple construction 
pr oject} , kit reviews, ea&y explanations on 
how to get started. Subscnptions are $ 1 0f 
year. 

How, the ARRL I can't think of any good 
the ARRL wilt do you other than let you 
readQST The ARRL won't help you with 
the FCC They represent their own inter- 
ests, not necessarily yours. Q ST ts worth 
getting as a reference, but it's not for new- 
comers 

Amateur radio can help kids enter a 
whole new world— technology. It can offer 
them fun, a whole array of exciting ca- 
reers, and a way to cope with the teen 
years. But we need to make this world 
available to the kids through school radio 
dubs* . , . Wayne 

Ocran M. Can K9RGV, Racine WI J am a 
long-time subscriber to 73. In one of your 
editorials, you asked the readers what 
they suggest you do to get their friends to 
subscribe to 73. 

I suggest you devote one page each 
month to some deserving black amateur 
radio operator. As publicist for the Omik 
Amateur Electronic Communications As- 
sociation, I can tetl you lhat 10% of today's 
hams are black, and we have never re- 
ceived the recognition that we deserve. 
Some examples' Mr. Everett Refroe 
W9HG, electronics instructor during WWl: 
Mr. James Cheeks W6TXW. an aviator 
who trained pilots for the Ethiopian Air 
Force, and introduced amateur radio to 
that nation in 1943; Mr. Robert F. Scott 
W2PWG, technical editor for Radio Elec- 
tronics Magazine for 30 years; Mr, Jack 
Chancellor W9SON. a physicist at Fern ion 
Lab. And the many black doctors who are 
hams even surprises me. 

I can supply you with photos and Infor- 
mation each month thai will prove to be 
interesting and informative, I can guaran- 
tee you thai our members will subscribe to 
73 if they think there is someihing in it 
about our organization, and white hams 
will buy the magazine because they didn't 
know there were any black hams, and to 
see what they are up to. hi. 

Yep, Vd be interested in some articles on 
black hams who *ve contributed to the hob- 
by: But I suspect your estimate of there 
being 50 r 0OO black hams ts wildly optt- 
mtstic. 

While it appears 10 me that blacks are 
much more disintegrated than they were a 
few years ago. and generally tend to go to 
much greater lengths now to avoid contact 
with whiteSr that doesn't explain the al- 
most total vacuum at Dayton and at every 
other hamfest I've attended in the lest 50 
years. 

Ocmn, I've met far more gay hams than 
black! And the same situation held when t 
was involved deeply in computers— al- 
most no blacks. I meet many m the music 
business, but mostly as performers, notes 
businessmen. This has nothing to do with 
prejudice or bias; this has been my experi- 
ence, it's the same for women— tew in ei- 
ther radio or computers. Now how can this 
be explained? What s your take? 

. , Wayne 



2 73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 



THE TEAM 

PUBLISHER/EDITOR 

Wayne Green W2NSD/1 
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER 

David CassidyNIGPH 



MANAGING EDITOR 

Bill Brown WeeELK 

PRODUCTION EDITOR 

Hope Currier 

SENIOR EDITOR 
Linda ReneauKAlU KM 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 
Joyce Sawtelle 

CONSULTING EDITOR 
Mike Nugent WB8GLQ 

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 
MikeBryceWeSVGE 
David CowhigWAlLBP 
Michael GeierKBtUM 
JfmGrayW1XU/7 
Chuck Houghton WB6IGP 
A rnie Johnson N18AC 
Or. Marc Leavey WA3AJR 
Andy MacAi lister WA5ZIB 
JoeMoeilK&OV 
Jim Morrissetl K6MH 
Bill Pasternak WA6ITF 
Carole Perry WS2MGP 
Bob Winn W5KNE 

ADVERTISING SALES 
REPRESENTATIVES 
Dan Harper 
Louise O 1 Sullivan 

ACCOUNT SERVICES 
Sue Colbert 

Donna DiRusso 

1-603-525-4201 
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FAX (603) 525-4423 

PRODUCTION MANAGER 
William Heydoipri 

PRODUCTION COORDINATOR 

Viki Van Valen 

ART DfRECTOR 
Alice ScofEe Id 

TYPESETTING/PAGINATION 

Linda Drew 
Ruin Benedict 
Steve Jewett 

GRAPHIC SERVICES 
Dale Williams 
Theresa Vervil I e 

GRAPHICS PHOTOGRAPHER 
Dan Croteau 

WGE PUBLISHING INC. 

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER 
Tim Pelkey 

CIRCULATION COORDINATOR 

Harvey Chandler 

CIRCULATION ASSISTANT 

Janet La Fountains 

To subscriber 1 -BQ0-28<H)388 

Editorial Offices 
WGE Center 

Forest Road, Hancock NH 03449 
603-525-4201 1 FAX (603) 525-4423 

Subscription Services 

1-800-28&-0388 

Colorado/ Foreign Subscribers 

call 1*303447-9330 

Wayne Green Enterprises is a division 
of Internationa! Data Group, 

Reprints; The first copy of an article 

$3.00 (each additional copy— $1 .50), 
Write to 73 Amateur Radio Magazine, 
WGE Center, Forest Road, Hancock, 

NH 03449. 



J3 Amateur 



JUNE 1 99 1 
Issue #369 



Radio Today 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 



FEATURES 



10 Three Bands With One Rock 
Versatile QRP transmitter for 80, 40 
and 20m. , WW9X 



14 Tune in on Philately 

Immortalized in stamps. 



18 A Pseudo CW Filter 

Be good to you rears, , . 



Schuessler 



WR5B 



22 Build the Brass Pounder's 
Keyer 

A memory keyer that reproduces your 
true CW "fist." AA6GG 

34 SPSM Mobile Mount 

Build this reliable Hustler classic. 

WfiOAL 



40 Parts Substitution 

A beginner's guide. . . 



KB1MW/7 



44 Software for the Ham Shack, 
Part II 

Useful ham calculations you can pro- 
gram yourself! WA4BLC 

50 Get on the WARC Bandwagon 

You can still enjoy good DXing, even 
as propagation conditions decline. 
. . . , , N4LBJ 



REVIEWS 



12 The KE2AM Voice ID and 
Repeater Controller 

Control your repeater economic- 
ally! WB8ELK 

38 Tripp Lite PR-25A and Isobar 8 GS 
Power supply and surge suppres- 
sor N1GPH 

46 SWISSLOG Version 3.66 

A complete GSO tracking system in 
one fast software program. WA3USG 



JI^Jl JLJl 




DEPARTMENTS 



62 Above and Beyond 
72 Ad Index 
66 Ask Kaboom 

85 ATV 

48 Barter V Buy 

64 Dealer Directory 
80 DX 

17 Feedback Index 
78 Ham Help 
56 Hams with Class 
54 Hamsats 
53 Homing In 

2 Letters 
68 Looking West 

4 Never Say Die 
61 New Products 
88 Propagation 
70 QRP 

7 QRX 

83 Random Output 
59 RTTYLoop 
82 73 International 

65 Special Events 

86 Uncle Wayne's Bookshelf 
68 Updates 



Three-band QRP with one crystal . . seepage 10. 

Cover by Alice Scofleld. Stamp photos by Raymond Schuessler. 



FEEDBACK... 
FEEDBACK! 

It's like being there— 
right here in our offices! 
How? J u si take advantage 
of our FEEDBACK card 
on page 1 7, YoiTll notice 
a feedback number at 
the beginning of each 
article and column. We'd 
like you to rate what you 
read so that we can print 
what types of things you 
likt best. And then we 
will draw one Feedback 
card each month for a 
free subscription to 73 . 



IF 






Editorial Offices 

WGE Center 

Hancock NH 03449 

phone: 603 526-4201 



Advertising Offices 

WGE Center 

Hancock NH 03449 

phone: 800-225-5083 



Circulation Off tees 
WGE Center 

Hancock NH 03449 
phone : 603-525-4201 



Manuscripts Contributions in the form of manuscripts with drawings and/or photographs are welcome 
and will be considered for possible publication. We can assume no responsibility for loss or damage to 
any mate ha I, Please enclose a stamped, self-ad dressed envelope with each sub mission. Payment for the 
use of any unsolicited material will be made upon publication A premium will be paid for accepted articles 
that have been submitted electronically (CompuServe ppn 7031 0,775 or tAC\ Mail " WG£PUB' ' or GEnie 
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to the 73 editorial offices, M How to Write for 73 "guide lines a re available upon request, US citizens must 
include their social security number with submitted manuscripts. 

73 Amateur Radio Today (ISSN 1052-2522) ts published monthly by WGE Publishing, Inc., WGE 
Center, Forest Road, Hancock, New Hampshire 03449. Entire contents ©1990 by WGE Publishing, Inc. 
No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. For 
Subscription Services write 73 Amateur Radio, PO Box 58866. BouJder, CO 80322-8866, or call 
1-800 289 0388. In CO call 1 303-447-9330. The Subscription rate is: one year $24.97; two years $3997. 
Additional postage for Canada is $7.00 and for other foreign countries, $19.00 surface and $37.00 airmail 
per year, All foreign orders must be accompanied by payment is US funds. Second class postage paid at 
Hancock, New Hampshire and at additional mailing offices. Canadian second class mail registration 
number 9566. Microfilm Edition— University Microfilm, Ann Arbor, Ml 48106, Postmaster: send address 
changes to 73 Amateur Radio , PO Box 58S66, Boulder, CO 80322-8866. 
Audit Bureau of Circulations {ABC) membership applied for. 

Contract: By reading this fine print you have become legally bound to get out of your rut and try 
something new. Do you spend all your time on SSB? Break out the old straight key and have a few GSOs 
in the Novice CW bands. Stuck on 2m repeaters? Try 6 meters. . .or microwaves. Does your station 
consist of $8,000 worth of store-bought gear? Pick up a $30 QRP kit, string together a $2 dipole, and go 
find a hilltop to operate from. Do something different! 



73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 3 



Number 2 on your Feedback card 



Never sa y die 



Wayne Green W2NSD/1 




Technology Fug its 

On the off chance that your finger on 
the mike button may be tired for a mo- 
ment , let's leave your total devotion to 
the survival at any cost ot our hobby of 
antique technologies and take a short 
trip into the presem. 

Are you prepared to get up in front of 
your local ham club and explain exactly 
how DSP works? Thai's Oigitat Signal 
Processing, old chap, It's one of those 
newfangled Japanese developments 
with which they're whipsawing what 
shreds we have (eft of our old con- 
sumer electronics industry 

Yamaha came out with the first prac- 
tical DSP unit two years ago, followed a 
year later by Sony, I think I wrote about 
the Yamaha system at the time, in case 
your memory is still intact, It's a clever 
invention and will, I expect, get very 
po purer tor home entertainment sys- 
tems. No, It doesn't have a lot of ap- 
plication in amateur radio, But some 
other new developments have) I'll get 
to those. 

As an electronics "expert," a little 
facade we practice on our friends and 
family, we realty should have at least a 
vague understanding of modern tech- 
nology. 

Okay, DSP. What they do here is to 
shoot off a gun in a series of different 
types of concert halls and rooms. They 
record the resulting echoes. Then they 
set about digitally copying the echoes 
and phasing which makes each hall 
sound different, The computer replica- 
tion of each hall is then programmed 
into chips, Thus, you can play a CD and 
make it sound exactly as if it is being 
performed in a small supper dub, in 
Carnegie Hall Westminster Abbey, 
Avery Fisher Hall, etc 

The only httch in the wagon here is 
that the original CD sound should be 
recorded in an anechoic room instead 
of a normal recording studio, Anechoic 
means without any reverberations at 
all. A totally silent room. These are not 
easy 10 ouiid and are a real corker to 
use. They're generally used for loud- 
speaker development and other scien* 
tific applications. 

Adding DSP to normal recordings 
may enhance their sound to some 
ears, but the result won't be a Boston 
Symphony Hall sound. Alas, as far as I 
know there aren't any anechoic record- 
ing studios yet Well, there will be soon 



since we're building one. To make it 
possible for the performers to hear 
what they're playing we're feeding the 
sound back to them, complete with 
DSP ambiance. Far's I know we'll have 
the first DSP-ready CDs on the market 
in a couple months. 

WeVe in the throes of finishing this 
new recording studio in time for Scott 
Kirby to lay down tracks for a third Scott 
Joplin ragtime CD. 

How d all that happen? Well, I've 
had it in my mind (no comments) ever 
since digital audio got started thai 
there would be a growing need for digi- 
tally ready state-of-the-art recording 
studios. I decided to try and not be five 
years ahead of my time on this, so I've 
been hanging back. 

Kirby did his first recording in the 
Peterborough Unitarian Church The 
sound was pretty good, but the Stein- 
way Grand was crummy and the 
recording sessions had to be done In 
the wee hours to avoid the noise of 
trucks driving down Main Street. That 
was a downer. 

The second CD was recorded in the 
garage at my farm in Hancock using a 
couple of 1890s upright grand pianos 
thai Knud Keller KV4GG (now KC1QP) 
found for us. We jury-rigged some 
wooden panels to give the garage a 
nice bright sound. Indeed the CD got a 
10/10 rating. , as high as it gets, It's 
been selling like hot cakes too. 

A few months ago one of my maga- 
zine circulation people! Phil Mart us. 
wanted some spare time work so I set 
him to straightening out my barn. He 
did such a good job he ended up with 
the whole center section empty. Hey, 
what a great spot for a studio? By luck 
Phil had lots of building experience, so 
he volunteered to take on the const ruc- 
tion job, 

Our recording; engineer, Dave Tor- 
rey. designed the studios and Phil, with 
some help from friends, did the con- 
struction . alHn a few weeks, A studio 
is enormously complicated. The walls 
have to be double and isolated from 
each other, Even the control room has 
to be isolated, with double windows, 
Bass-traps have to be built into the ceil- 
ing and walls. The heating, air condi- 
tioning and humidity control systems 
have to be totally silent 

One studio is normal and a second 
has sound absorbent walls, ceiling and 
floor, so itll be the first recording studio 



In the country capable of turning out 
digital signal process ing-(DSP) ready 
recordings 

DCC 

That stands for Digital Compact Cas- 
sette, Philips (Holland) and Tandy (Ft. 
Worth) are working on a new approach 
to digital tape. DAT, digital audio tape, 
requires a new format which is just like 
a miniature video cassette DCC uses 
a cassette which is the same shape as 
our regular audio cassettes. With a 
DCC system we'll be able to ptay both 
DCC and audio cassettes with the 
same player. 

Which brings up the question of how, 
without a high speed rotating recording 
head, can they get all that digital infor- 
mation on that eentsy tape? Well, what 
they've done is to find ways to cut down 
on the amount of Information required 
to make our ears think they are hearing 
digital quality sound. Even though 
they've cut the amount of information 
down to about 25% of what's recorded 
on a DAT system. It stili sounds good, 
I've listened to it, 

If we have any technically inclined 
hams left they might be encouraged to 
see what they can do about digitizing 
the really low quality sound we require 
to talk all day saying nothing (with a 
few exceptions). Then they can start 
to work with every data compacting 
system they can find to improve the 
throughput. 

Hmmm. you know, if we were to first 
send out an algorithm which makes it 
possible for a receiver to imitate our 
individual voice, then all we'd have lo 
do is get the words we're speaking 
through as compacily as possible and 
reconstruct our voices with the al- 
gorithm. Follow me? Well, it was just a 
thought. 

Every time I get together with engi- 
neers I'm amazed at how much pro- 
gress is being made in data compact- 
ing. There are some new systems that 
were being discussed at the Consumer 
Electronic Show in Las Vegas in Janu- 
ary thai are able to cut the data by i 77 
and still not lose anything! They're us- 
ing some of these approaches to get 
the bandwidth of HDTV down. 

Of course J Joke about our being able 
to gel the bandwidth of ham transmis- 
sions down to under 1 Hz. Sort of joke, 
that is. If you've listened in to much 
ham gabble you know that the amount 



of data throughput is minimal. Call, 
name, town, signal report and,..? 
Once those have been said a few times 
many ops seem to run dry. My sugges- 
tion is that we send our call and then a 
dot which will telllhe other op that our 
name and town are in the Catthook, so 
look it up. The report is 6-9 (what else is 
there?). Please QSL 73. Two dots 
coming back says roger on your name 
and town in the Cattbook: roger on the 
5-9, you're the same; roger on the 
QSL; 73. Save a lot of time and hassle. 
(f you find good information re* 
sources for amateur radio associated 
new technologies, whether maga- 
zines, books or newsletters, let me 
know so I can pass the word along. And 
if you come up with some ham applica- 
tions, please consider 73 as a place to 
gel published. 

Okay; Experimenters! 

There are some new chips which 
should have you busy breadboard! ng 
in short order. They are somewhat ex* 
pensive, right out of the chute, but I 
expect well see prices declining as 
production ramps up. Now stop fuss* 
ing. Til tell you what it's all about. 
They're called analog storage chips 

If you have to ask me what to do with 
an analog storage chip, I know you're 
asleep at the switch. The whole idea 
should have had you jumping oul of 
your chair with excitement. 

What can you do with 'em? Well, 
how about building a semi-intelligent 
QSO machine? Each chip will hold up 
to 20 seconds of voice, so you're going 
to need a few. Let's say you rig up the 
first one so that when you make a con- 
tact you speak the other chap's call 
into a chip. You might store his name in 
a second chip. Are you getting it yet? 

When it's your turn to iransmit you 
turn on your rig and the first chip gives 
his call. Your QSO machine automati- 
cally switches to a series of chips which 
give your call . your name, signal report 
(5-9 , of coursel), and all the stuff you 
always say during your first transmis- 
sion. The chip with his name recorded 
on it clicks in whenever your QSO chip 
flags it. This personalizes the contact. 

A perfectionist might use a separate 
chip to store the signal reports and just 
push a button to indicate which report 
will be given. 

All it'll take are three or four chips to 
hold your normal QSO information, the 
stuff you've been repeating over and 
over for years with little variation. You 
can even free yourseff of having to 
record the other chap's name 90% of 
the time by having a dedicated name 
chip with 20 seconds worth of names 
on it. You just push the button for the 
name and it'll switch it in for you. 

How does all this work? It's simple, 
the chip samples the voice message 
6.400 times per second, digilizmg it 
This gives you a 2 7 kHz passband, 
which is fine for most hamming. They 
have a 3.4 kHz passband chip if you 
don't mind spending a little more per 
chip and only getting 16 seconds of 
voice. Being thrifty (cheap), I know 
you'll go for the 2.7. Hi-fi fanatics may 

Continued on page 73 



4 73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 







TM-441A/TM-541A 

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transceivers 




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the remote control options allow you 
to customize your installation for 
that "professional'* look! 

• Wide band receiver coverage. The 
TM-241A receives from 118-173,995 
MHz. Transmit range is 144-148 MHz. 
(Modifiable for MARS and CAP 
operation, permits required.) 

• TM-441 A covers 438-449,995 MHz, 
and the TM-531A covers 
1240-1299.995 MHz. 

• CTCSS encode built-in, selectable 
from the front panel 

• Selectable frequency steps for 
quick and easy QSY 

• TM-241A provides 50 WTM-441A 
35 W, and TM-541A 10 W. Three 
power positions, 5, 10, and full The 
TM-541A has two power positions, 
land 10 watts, 

• 20 full-function memory channels 
store frequency, repeater offset 
sub-tone frequencies, and repeater 
reverse information. Repeater 
offset on 2m is automatically 
selected. There are four channels 
for "odd split" operation. 

• Tone Alert System with Elapsed 
Time indicator. 

• Auto-power off function, and time- 
out timer. 

Specifications guaranteed tor Amateur band use oniy 



«r ts~t t v 





RC-20 Remote Control Unit 

As supplied, one RC-20 will control 
one transceiver. Most often-used 
front panel functions are control- 
lable from the RC-20 The RC-20 
and IF-20 combine to allow control 
of up to four radios. 



Selective calling and pager option. 
The DTU-2 option enables the Dual 
Tone Squelch System (DTSS), allow- 
ing selective calling and paging using 
standard DTMF tones. 



Digital recording system option. 
Used in conjunction with the tone 
alert system, the DRU-1 allows mes- 
sage storage of up to 32 seconds. 
Multiple scanning functions. Band 
and memory scan, with selectable 
scan stops and memory channel 
lock-out 

Large LCD display with four-step 
dimmer control. 

Automatic Lock Tuning (ALT) for 
the TM-541A. Compensates for drift 



• Supplied accessories. Mounting 
bracket, DC cable, fuses, MC-44DM 
multi-function DTMFmic. 

Optional accessories 

• DRU-1 Digital Recording Unit 

• DTU-2 DTSS unit • IF-20 Interface 
unit, used with the RC-20, allows more 
than two transceivers to be remotely 
controlled • MA-700 2m/70cm dual 
band antenna with duplexer (mount 
not supplied}* MB-201 Extra mount- 
ing bracket • MC-44 Multi-function 
hand microphone • MC-55 (8-pin) 
Mobile mic, with time-out timer 

• MC-60A, MC-80 3 MC-85 Base 
station mics. ■ PG-2N Extra DC cable 

• PG-3B DC line noise filter * PG-4G 
Extra control cable • PG-4H Interface 
connecting cable * PG-4J Extension 
cable kit • PS-50/PS-430 DC power 
supplies* RC-10 Handset remote con- 
troller • RC-20 Remote control head 

• SP-41 Compact mobile speaker 

• SP-50B Mobile speaker • TSU-6 
Programmable CTCSS decoder 

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The TS-950SD can receive two fre- 
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lewl Digital AF filter Synchronized 
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Additional Features: + Built-in inter- 
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Adjustable VFO tuning torque 
a Multiple scanning functions 

• MC-43S hand microphone supplied 

Optional Accessories 

DSP-10 Digital Signal Processor * 

• SO-2 TCXO* ■ VS-2 Voice synthesizer 

• YK-B8C-1 500 Hz CW filter for 8,83 MHz IF* 

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• YG-455S-1 2.4 kHz SSB filter for 455 kHz IF* 
SP-950 External speaker w/AF filter 

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EDITED & Y UNDA RENEA U KA I UKM 



STS-37 Success! 

Some exciting amateur radio 
firsts were achieved during the 
lastest flight of the space shuttle 
Atlantis. Astronaut Ken Cameron 
KB5AWP reported seeing good 
video from KC6A in Los Angeles, 
WA4NZD at the Marshall Space 
Flight Center, N9AB in the Chicago 
area (the farthest north contact), 
and WA3NAN at the Goddard 
Space Flight Center (linking via the 
40-foot dish at the U.S. Naval 
Academy, shown in the May 
■'QRX 1 '). In addition, Andy N9AB 
sent up a video tape of the STS-37 
launch. This is the first time live tele- 
vision has been uplinked to any 
U.S. spacecraft, and the first time a 
shuttle crew could watch their own 
launch while still in space 

It is uncertain at this writing 
whether the other two uplink sites 
were successful. KE4PT at the Mo- 
torola club in Florida, and the John- 
son Space Center radio club 
(W5RRR), made several attempts, 
which may be on the second video 
tape recorded on board the orbiter. 

In another first, a brief con- 
tact was completed between Ken 
Cameron KB5AWP on board the 
Atlantis and Musa Manarov U2MIR 
on the Soviet space station Mir. 
Musa later confirmed the contact via a mes- 
sage on his orbiting packet BBS. On the tape 
recorded on the shuttle, Musa could be heard 
clearly, 

A number of school contacts were estab- 
lished via a telephone bridge during several of 
the passes. Each of the all-ham crew an- 
swered questions from members of the select- 
ed schools, 

A problem occurred in the audio path of the 
SAREX module which prevented any packet 
contacts or SSTV uplinking. However, at least 
a few SSTV downlinks were suc- 
cessful. 

Watch for the complete STS-37 
story in the July issue of 73 Thanks 
to Lou McFadin W5DID, Andy 
Bachfer N9AB and Dick Chris- 
tiansen KK4HF for the above info. 




Photo A. Members of the Marshall Amateur Radio Cfub pose in front 
of antennas for sending ATV to Atlantis. Left to right: Terry Jones 
NZ8C. Randy Galloway KN4QS, Gene Marcus W3PM. Don Heidiger 
N4MSN, Larry Savage WA4CAX, EdStluka W4QAU, Tim Cunning- 
ham N8DEU. 



Monday night from 10 p.m + to midnight on 
SpacenetOne, transponder 15(81-15). PJans 
are lor a call-in talk show from 9 pm. till mid- 
night, Mondays through Fridays, on the same 
channel. The nightly talk shows will cover top- 
ics on amateur radio, specialty modes, short- 
wave listening, and satellite TV. 

You don't need a satellite dish to tune in to 
the program. All amateur radio operators have 
permission from QSO Amateur Radio to re- 
transmit the show over both audio and ATV 
repeaters, Also, every Tuesday night from 9 to 



10 p.m., the ATV net on 3.871 MHz 
will actually be uplinked to the satel- 
lite. Check into the net and hear 
your signal via the satellite as well! 
Bill WB6ELK wilt host an ATV talk 
show after the net until 1 1 p,m. 

The talk shows can be heard on 
the standard 6,8 MHz subcarrier, 
except Mondays between 10 p.m. 
and midnight when the talk show will 
operate on the 6.2 MHz subcarrier 
{concurrent with the video show). 

For more information, contact 
Jim Bass at (315) 873-3752. 

Videos Needed 

Tapes of the recent SAREX 
hams-in-space mission are need- 
ed to produce a new educational 
video. Specifically sought is footage 
of youngsters in schools making 
contact with the alMiam crew on the 
shuttle. It may be in Betacam, 3/4" 
U-Matic. M-JI or 1 ■ Type C. Also ac- 
ceptable are tapes on the Super 
VHS (S-VHS) and Hi-8 home video 
formats. NOT wanted are standard 
0, VHS or VHS*HG t Betamax, or 
home movie film. Producers Roy 
Meal K6DUE and Bill Pasternak 
WA6ITF will use as many shots as 
possible in the finished video, due 
out in late summer or early fall. In- 
clude a self-addressed, stamped 
mailer, if you want your video back. 
Send all videotapes to SAREX '91 VIDEO, 
<&BiII Pasternak WA61TF, 28197 Robin Ave., 
Saugus CA 91 350. TNX Westradio. 



Amateur Radio Talk 
Show on Satellite TO 

"QSO Amateur Radio,' a 
weekly TV show hosted by Jack 
Smith WA2QYT, has been active 
over the past lew months to an 
ever increasing audience. The 
video portion of the show airs every 



Power Audit Results 

As a result of "power audits" of 209 ama- 
teur radio stations last winter, the FCC has 
come to three conclusions. First, that most 
amateurs are not operating at minimum power 
as required by Rule 97.313(a). Second, that 
reduced power can alleviate signifi* 
cant reception interference prob- 
lems in consumer electronics gear 
without serious degradation to com- 
munication capabilities. And third, 
that in addition to lowering output 
power, installing filters at either the 
transmitter or receiver might be re- 
quired to eliminate interference. 

FCC Field Operations Bureau 
Chief Richard Smith said that 75% 
of the stations surveyed experi- 
enced no degradation when their 
output power was reduced by more 
than 50 percent. However, even 
running low power cannot solve in- 
Photo B. Moody T Law WQ61, the 22nd president of OMIK will serve terference problems in many cases. 
the 39-year-otd organization for the next two years. The study is being forwarded to 

73 Amateur Radio Today • Jane, 1991 7 







QRX. . . 



^^^^^a^^^^^m 




Photo C. The parents and students of the Springfield Estates Ham Club. Luke is in the center. 



the Private Radio Bureau for evaluation. It 
would be the purview of the PRB to make any 
recommendation to the Commissioners for 
regulatory action. TA/XWestlink Report, 



OMIK'S WQ6I 



The nation's largest black amateur radio 
organization. OMSK Electronic Communi- 
cation Association, elected a new slate of 
officials this year at a convention held in 
Atlanta, Georgia. Elected for president was 
Mt\ Moody T\ Law WQ6I of ClaremonL Califor- 
nia, to head OMIK for the next two years. Mr, 
Law, the twenty-second president of OMIK, 
majored in biology at the Spring Hill College in 
Mobile and also in Nashville at the Tennessee 
A&l University, He completed graduate work 
in business administration at Laverne Univer- 
sity in Laverne. California. For the past 19 
years he has worked with Schering Labs, 
training and supervising pharmaceutical ser- 
vice representatives. He is past president of 
the Los Angeles Amateur Radio Club and is 
committed to the challenges encountered by 
OMIK. 

The name "OMIK" originated from the first 
letters of the states of Ohio. Michigan, Indi- 
ana, and Kentucky, where the first members 
of the organization lived. OMIK had its begin- 
nings on the campus of Wilberforce State Col- 
lege tn Wilberforce, Ohio, in the early '50s. 
The original group of 1 1 black members has 
grown to several thousand, with members lo- 
cated in 42 states and several other countries. 
A sizable number of YLs and XYLs have been 
associated with the group since its inception, 
and they have been invaluable to its success 
over the years. 

OMIK's fundamental purpose is to promote 
fellowship among those interested in the ad- 
vancement of amateur radio, This includes 
electronics, technology, public service, and 
the promotion of international good will. OMIK 
also serves as the national organization for a 
network of local amateur radio clubs. Any li- 
censed amateur radio operator who supports 
the ideals of the association may join OMIK. 

8 73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 



OMIK membership enjoys a diverse range 
of professional, skilled, and retired people- 
all brought together by their common interest 
in and enjoyment of amateur radio. TNX 
Ocran Martin CarrKQRGV. 

Luke Ward KC4UJS 

Every Friday evening at the Springfield 
Estates Elementary School in Springfield, 
Virginia, eight-year-old General Class Luke 
Ward KC4UJS and his father, Keith Ward 
KC4TZJ, teach amateur radio to a group of 17 
students and 15 parents. Studying together 
makes learning fun and easy for everyone. 
Parents and children are members of the 
Springhilt Estates Ham Club, the second ham 
club started this year by volunteers of the ML 
Vernon ARC. Luke Ward KC4UJS is in the 
front center row in the photo, wearing his blue 
Mt. Vernon ARC shirt. 

KC4UJS sometimes whtes for "The Bacon 
Bits/' a newsletter for young hams and hams* 



to-be in kindergarten through eighth grade. It 
is published by the Marlborough Communica- 
tions Club and the Marlborough Desktop Pub- 
lishing Class in Kansas City, Missouri. TNX 
David Cowhig WA1LBP. 



Ham Arrested 



Last April, amateur radio operator James 
A. Haas of Athens, Ohio, was arrested by 
federal authorities for making false dis- 
tress calls. At a hearing, he was released on 
$100,000 personal recognizance bond. If con- 
victed, Haas could get five years in prison and 
be fined $250,000, 

Haas is suspected of making dozens of fake 
distress calls in Athens, Cincinnati, and 
Columbus, Ohio, and also in Kenton County, 
Kentucky, Many of the calls resulted in mas- 
sive searches by police agencies, One call 
resulted in a 10-hour search involving 15 po- 
lice agencies and helicopters, 

FBI spokesman Ed Bolt said the calls also 
included tones and noise broadcast over po- 
lice frequencies, interfering with legitimate 
police transmissions, and some "harassing 
and obscene statements" over the Kentucky 
State Police frequency, 

Haas was located by the FCC, FBI, and 
Prince William (Virginia) police using so- 
phisticated radio direction finding equipment. 
A cassette marked M stren" with a variety of 
sounds of police sirens, was found in the 
van with Haas. Haas was in the Washington. 
D,C. area to attend an amateur radio conven- 
tion. 

The 39-year-old ham is adviser to the ham 
radio club at the high school where he teaches 
physical education. TNX David B, Emmons for 
the Washington Post dipping and Westradio 
for the AP material. 




Photo D. Eleven-year-old Tiffany Karabin KASYHF, Head Librarian Caroline Gillis, and Mike 
Karabin N3GJT, look over the books donated to the library by the Warminster Amateur Radio Club, 




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Covers 1.8-30 MHz . . . plus you get dummy load, peak readi 
switch, balun and one full year unconditional guarantee ■ . . 

Wore hams use the MFJ- 9490 than 
any other tuner in ham radio. 

Why? Because no other 300 watt 
tuner gives you this combination of 
features and value 

The MFJ-949D gives you a highly 
developed product with years of proven 
reliability and a reputation for being able 
to match |ust about anything, 

A lighted peak reading cross-needle 
meter that shows you SWR, forward and 
reflected power. A 6-position antenna 
switch lets you select 2 coax lines (direct 
or thru tuner), random wire or balanced 
line and built-in dummy load. You also 
get a balun and 1.8-30 MHz coverage, 

Special Inductor Switch 

The inductor swrtcti is me most likely 
tuner component to burn up. 

The MFJ-9490 gives you an inductor 
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stand The extreme voltages and currents 
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l You get a solid feel and positive click 




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Number 4 on your Feedback card 



Three Bands with One Rock 

Versatile QRP transmitter for 80, 40 and 20m. 

by Mike Gasperi WW9X 



When building simple QRP rigs, the 
most expensive and difficult pan to 
find is the cr\ stal, or rock. Usually they have 
to be specially ordered, and delivery may be 
slow. The transmitter design in this article 
allows the same crystal to serve multiple 
bands * which makes for flexible and econom- 
ic operation. 

The Circuit 

The circuit consists of seven basic ele- 
ments: (he oscillator, divider, keying circuit, 
amplifier, receiver limiter, filters, and power 
supply. It's designed to operate from 12 
VDC, with about 1 watt output on all three- 
bands. Operation is simple, The desired fre- 
quency is selected for amplification, and the 
appropriate low pass output filter switched in 
line with the antenna. Forty meter band crys- 
tals can also be used in the oscillator, with 
division by two to get frequencies in the 80 
meter band. Or you can use 80 meter band 
crystals with no division. 

The transmitter block diagram is shown in 
Figure 1 . Central to its operation is the fact 
that the amateur bands are harmonically re- 
lated. Twenty meters is twice the frequency 
of 40 meters, and twice again that of 80. 
Normally, frequencies arc synthesized up- 
ward, starring with a low one and doubling or 
tripling it to (he desired higher frequency. 
However, digital logic chips easily divide 
high frequencies to low, and this is how J used 
one 20 meter band crystal to operate on 40 
and 80 meters as well. 

The Oscillator 

The variable crystal oscillator is made 
from two TTL inverters in Ul. Gates from 
the high power CMOS (HC) family should 
be used since they have much better logic 
levels and thresholds (nearly zero to Vcc) 
than other TTL families, such as LS. Vcc, 
Resistors R I and R2 bias the gates into Linear 
operation while variable capacitor CI is used 




Photo. A peek inside as the finished circuit. 

to shift the crystal frequency. The other in- 
verters are used to buffer the oscillator and 
shape up the waveform. 

Crystal XI is a plated, AT-cut fundamental 
crystal in a HC-6/U holder. However, this 
oscillator design is very tolerant, and works 
with most microprocessor, color burst, and 
other surplus crystals, For three-band opera- 
tion, the crystal must be cut for the 20 meter 
band. I use 14.060 MHz since it is the stan- 
dard QRP for 20 meters. Divided by two, it 
gives 7.030 MHz, which is near the 7.040 
MHz* 40 meter QRP frequency . Dividing by 
four gives 3 . S 1 5 MHz for HO meters, which is 
fine if you have an Extra class license, 

You could also cut ihe crystal for the 14. 1 1 
to 14. 15 MHz subband: this would make the 
divided frequencies near 7,060 and 3.530 
MHz usable with a General class license. 
Unfortunately, not a lot of CW goes on that 
far up the 20m band, since other countries can 
broadcast single sideband there. 

The Divider 

U2 is a 4-bit binary divider that creates 
frequencies harmonically lower than the os- 
cillator. Usually, only division by two or four 
are of any use for amateur operation, but 
connection to eight is provided just in ease. 
The HC logic family should be used for U2 
for reasons already mentioned. A 74HC163 
can be substituted for the 74HC161 since the 



QSCfLLATQfl 



DIVIDER 



-2 

-4 

-s 



A. 



AMPLIFIER 



J 



RE ' 



RE ' 



FILTE* 



A. 



AN' 



\.W\1%* 



R-CV 



Figure L Circuit Mock diagram. 
10 73 Amateur Radio Today » June, 1991 



clear function is not utilized. All unused in- 
puts to the chip must be tied appropriately 
high or low for reliable operation. 

tag 

Keying is accomplished by powering Ul 
and U2 through transistor QL Voltage regu- 
lator U3 is used to create the five-voU power 
needed for the TTL gates. Wave-shaping is 
controlled by C5, C6, and R3- The values 
given create a crisp wave shape without no- 
ticeable clicks or chirps. If a keyer is used, it 
should be set for positive keying. 

Amplifier 

The selected frequency is first amplified in 
current by the emitter follower Q2< It then 
passes to the Class C outpul amplifier transis- 
tor Q3 via C8. Resistor R6 guarantees that Q3 
is off during key-up, while diode Dl keeps 
the base voltage from going too negative. 
Transistor Q3 is a 2N2219A, which is just 
able to handle the I watt output power. It is 
inexpensive and easy to find. You should 
definitely heat-sink it. 

Harmonic Filters 

Depending on the selected frequency, an 
appropriate filter must be used to reduce har- 
monic content. Basically, the waveforms are 
square up to this point, and rich with odd 
harmonics. The three fillers given arc pi- 
configuration low pass, with 14, 7, and 3,5 
MHz cutoffs. An option of bypassing the 
filters is given with S2 and S3, so that off- 
board filters can be used or circuits de- 
bugged. Changing frequency bands requires 
setting both switches, S2 and S3, so that only 
the desired filter is connected. 

Li miter 

Full break-in QSK operation is achieved by 
picking off the antenna signal with C It . Dur- 
ing transmit, the RF is limited by a pair of 
diodes, D2 and D3. Although this only limits 
the signal to about 1 Vpp. it's sufficient to 
prevent damage to receivers. There is quite a 
bit of signal loss with this technique. An 
external transmit-receive TR switch is anoth- 
er good alternative. 

Power Supply 

Capacitors C4 and C9 filter the input 
voltage to the transmitter. The 5- volt power 
for Ul and U2 is created by U3, a TO-5 
package voltage regulator. C2 and C3 arc 
bypass capacitors located at each digital inte- 
grated circuit. Radio frequency choke LI and 




Figure 2, Schematic diagram. 



capacitor CIO keep the 12 volt power to the 
final transistor clean and solid. 

Construction Notes 

A circuit board etching pattern is illustrated 
in Figure 3, and a component layout for the 
pattern is shown in Figure 4. Other construc- 
tion techniques should also work, The digital 
integrated circuits need solid grounds and 
proper bypass capacitors. Toroidal inductors 
L3, L4, and L5 should be wound spreading 
the turns over about two-thirds of the circum- 
ference. Leads should be kept as short as 
possible on all components. The DIP switch- 
es need to be easily accessible when you* re 
switching bands, so don't bury them in a deep 
enclosure. Variable capacitor CI also needs 
to be available to fine-tune the operating fre- 
quency, Simple RCA jacks can serve for all 
four external connections : just make sure 
they are properly labeled to prevent acciden- 
tal damage. 

Performance 

The prototype transmitter output power to 
a 50 ohm load wish 12 volts input power wa,s 
0.8 watts on 20 meters, and 1 .2 warts for 40 
and 80 meters. Power supply input current 
was measured at 250 mA for an input power 
of 3.0 watts. This gives about 40% total effi- 
ciency for the entire transmitter. Harmonics 
were 30 dB down, and no key click or chirp 
was observed . Operation on as little as 6 volts 

Cunimued on page 42 





Parts List 


C1 


20-100 pF f mica tr immer 


C2-7 


O.t uF T monolithic 


C8 


0.00"* uF. disk ceramic 


C9 P 10 


22 uF 25V. electrolytic or tantalum 


C11 


65 pF, disk ceramic 


C12 


220 pF, silver-mica or polystyrene 


C13 


330 pF. silver-mica or polystyrene 


CH 


560 pF, silver-mica or polystyrene 


C15 


820 pF, silver-mica or polystyrene 


C16 


1000 pF. sitver-mica or polystyrene 


C17 


1800 pF. silver-mica or polystyrene 


CIS 


24 pF, disk ceramic 


m,2 


470 ohms, 1/4 watt 


R3 


1k, 1/4 watt 


R4 


4.7k, U4watt 


R5 


180 ohms, 1/4 watt 


R6 


220 ohms, 1/4 watt 


D1-3 


1N914 


S1-3 


DIP switches, 4-position 


Q1 


2N3906 


02 


2N3904 


03 


2N2219A, with heat sink 


L1 


33 uH, RFC 


L2 


22uH,RFC 


L3 


12 turns #22 enamel, on T50-6 


L4 


14 turns #24, on T50-2 


L5 


201ums#26 i onT50-2 


U1 


74HC04 


U2 


74HCl6l,or74HCl63 


U3 


78M05 5V regulator. TO-5 package 


X1 


f undamentaf mode, with socket (See text.) 


P1^I 


RCA jacks 



Suitable enclosure with mounting hardware 
A blank PC board is available for $4.50 & $1 .50 
postagemandiing per order from FAR Circuits, 
18N640 Field Court, Dundee IL 601 18, 



WW9X 




Figure 3. Primed circuit pattern for foil side. 



c^ 



R2 














* 

u 


1 m 










SI 






12V. 
\ 



01 




I 



Figure 4. Parts placement. 

73 Amateur Radio Today • June T 1991 11 



Number 5 on your Feedback card 



73 Review 



by Bill Brown WB8ELK 



The KE2AM Voice ID 

and Repeater Controller 

Control your repeater economically! 



Get-Tech 

George Tarnovsky KE2AM 

201 RD2 Riley RcL 

New Windsor NY 12550 

(914) 564-5347 

Price Class: $69, $85 with 

battery-backed socket 



How would you like a repeater controller/ 
ID that actually identifies in your own 
voice? George Tarnovsky KE2AM of Get- 
Tech has designed just such an animal. 
His controller provides you with the basic 
timing signals to put together a very eco- 
nomical repeater system, it even provides 
you with the capability of identifying in your 
own voice with the onboard digital voice 
recorder. 

The Voice Recorder/IDer 

The KE2AM controller is offered completely 
assembled for the amazingly low price of $69. 
All parts are mounted on a high quality 3.75" x 
3.375' circuit board, 

The voice record section consists mainly of 
a surface-mounted control chip, along with a 
256K memory IC A jumper chooses between 
6 or 12 seconds of recorded message. 

The unit is designed to take low-levet audio 
from a microphone. I just hooked up my re- 
mote HT mike to the audio input terminals. To 
record your message, just flip the record/play- 
back switch and press the momentary contact 
start button. When using other audio sources* 
you may want go through a potentiometer to 
drop the audio down to acceptable levels. The 
audio will sound clipped if you overdrive the 
recorder 

Now; just flip back to play, then hit the start 
button for an instant replay. You can choose 
two sampling rates via a jumper wire. In the 5 
kHz rate, you get 12 seconds of message 
time, but you will notice some sampling distor- 
tion, For higher fidelity, use the 11 kHz rate, 
but you only get 6 seconds for your message, 
Even at the higher sampling rate, you'll notice 
something of a background hiss. Another 
jumper allows you to select a low-pass filter 
which eliminates most of this. Although low- 
levet audio is all that is necessary for your 
repeater transmitter, the controller has an LM- 
336 audio amplifier which can drive a small 
speaker loud enough to hear in even the noisi- 
est environments. 

With the fitter m place and at the higher 
sampling rate, I found the reproduction to be 

12 73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 



of excellent quality. Six seconds may not 
seem like a lot but it is more than sufficient for 
a repeater ID. 

Repeater Controller 

This board is not only a high quality voice 
recorder, it also supplies all of the timing sig- 
nals necessary for repeater control. A connec- 
tion to your receiver's squelch line is all that's 
needed to activate the transmit controller and 
timer logic. Your receiver's squelch circuit 
must be able to supply 3 to 12 votts when 
activated. In most rigs, it's possible to tap this 
off of the receive LED, When an open squelch 
signal is detected, the controller turns on an 
open collector transistor to key your re- 
peater's transmitter. The transmitter enable 
signal is atso controlled by the status of on- 
board timers. 

Three separate timers, along with associated 
logic circuitry, comprise the controller section. 

The ID timer makes sure that your repeater 
is identified every 7.5 
minutes. It won't ID with 
each transmission. It 
will reset when first acti- 
vated and identify with 
the next transmission 
after 7.5 minutes has 
elapsed. 

The time-out timer 
keeps conversations 
from getting too long- 
winded. After two min- 
utes of continuous trans- 
mission, it will drop out 
the transmitter until re- 
set by the squelch line. 

The squelch tail 
timer gives you 2,5 sec- 
onds of hang time when 
the repeater is dropped. 

Impressions 

I found the KE2AM 
controller to be a very 
convenient way to put 
together a basic re- 



peater quickly and inexpensively Using two 
HTs and this controller, I was able to put to- 
gether a portable crossband repeater with rel- 
atively little fuss and bother. Its been great 
taking this to hamfests or up to mountaintops. 

The controller requires 8-15 volts at 118 
rnA. The current drain may be a little on the 
high side, but most of it is due to the PAL logic 
array. The plus side is that the PAL circuit 
reduces the IC count considerably. 

Since the RAM memory is erased when the 
power drops out, your voice message dis- 
appears. This could prove to be a major prob- 
lem if your repeater site has a power glitch 
or outage, Fortunately, Gel-Tech offers a 
battery-backed socket option that retains 
RAM memory when power to the controller is 
removed. 

I highly recommend the KE2AM controller. 
It's a high quality unit that will leave enough 
money in your pocket to build the rest of your 
repeater. 




The KE2AM voice recorder and repeater controller* 






high-quality 





*• • 



Amateur Television Products 





- 70 w/MPS- 100 



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television transceiver utilizing VSB (Vestigial Sideband) technology 
to minimize adjacent channel interference and preserve spectrum 
space; built-in UHF GaAsFET preamp to improve reception; 
covers the 70 cm band, 420 - 440 MHz; inter-modulation distortion 
less than -42 dBc; one watt PEP output; monitor transmitted and 
received signals on your standard TV receiver; audio and video 
input via front panel 10-pin camera jack or rear panel RCA audio 
and video inputs (switchable); crystal-controlled or variable-tuning 
down converter: crystals for 434 and 439.25 MHz are included; 
optional crystals for 421.25 and 426.25 are available; requires 
13.6 VDC @ 1.5 amps - $349.95 



NEW! RLA-70 Remote Linear Ampler with Power Supply: 

mast-mounted amplifer boosts your ATV signal up to 50 watts PEP; 
equivalent to a 100 watt amplifier in the ham shack with a3dB 
line toss; built-in GaAsFET preamp mounted at the antenna where 
it does the most good; power supplied through the coax; includes 
MPS-100 Multi-purpose Power Supply: provides a well-regulated 
28V DC@6 amps for the RLA-70; also provides regulated 13.6V 
DC@2 amps for the VSB-70 - $699.00 



430-16 Antenna: high-performance* computer optimized yagi 
specifically designed for ATV operation: broadband frequency 





coverage from 420 to 440 MHz; 16 elements gieyou 14.3 dBd 
gain; O-ring sealed connectors; 28 degree E-plane beam width; 
32 degree H-plane beam width; 10 foot boom $119.95 



AVT Master Amiga Video Terminal: SSTVand FAX 
system (hardware and software) tor transmit and receive with your 
Commodore Amiga Computer; 55 SSTV modes in up to 4,096 
simultaneous colors; Nine FAX modes in up to 16 grey levels; 
eight function "repair kit" vastly reduces damage caused by QRM 
or QRN; on-screen tuning scope; mode-to-mode conversions- 
interpolating zoom; image tinting, brightness and contrast control; 
text overlay using multiple fonts, boldface, italics and underlining 
in any combination or color; automatic CW and/or synthesized 
speech ID after transmit; custom color bar generation; user-defined 
FAX demodulation curves; image rotation and flipping; paint 
compatible; extensive ARexx language support; real-time software 
filtering for scope and receive operations; grab screens to transmit 
from any digitizer or operating program in real-time; automatic 
start and run at any time; image printing in both black-and-white 
and color on hundreds of printers . . . . * $299.95 

Specifications subject to change without notice Of obligation. Prices 
listed are suggested Amateur Net through participating dealers. 

Technical support may be obtained through CompuServe's Hamnet 
forum. Messages should be sent to user ID 076702, 1013, 



Advanced Electronic Applications, Inc. 

P.O. Box C2 160/ 2006 196th St. S.W. Lynnwood, WA 98036-0918 

Technical Support & Sales: (206) 775-7373 Fax: (206) 775-2340 

© Copyright 1991 by AEA. inc. AH Rights Reseived. 







Number $ on your Feedback card 



DEUTSCH ES 









DAHOME 



IMUNfCStlQNS 



Tune in on Philately 

Immortalized in stamps. 




by Raymond Schuessler 



All around the world, countries have hon- 
ored a mate ii r radio and ham radio oper- 
ators on their postage stamps. Collecting 
these stamps can be a fun hobby for hams. 

Postage stamps originated in England in 
1840. From the beginning, postal authorities 
designed stamps to honor the great mile- 
stones in science, medicine, the arts, and 
history. The people and events so depicted 
have earned a permanent niche in world his- 
tory—for stamps never perish. If archaeolo- 
gists of the far future unearthed our civiliza- 
tion, they would have a good idea of our 
culture and history from our stamps. 

Ham operators deserve the honor they have 
received in philately . When you hear stories 
of lives saved, you know these badges of 
honor arc well -deserved. Stories I have heard 
include a New Orleans operator who heard an 
emergency call for snake serum in Columbia, 
and relayed the call; an operator who heard a 
call for help from a ship in the arctic that had 
struck an iceberg; and an operator in Canada 
who helped rescue four soldiers in Manitoba, 
1,500 miles away, 

The postage stamps honoring amateur ra- 
dio commemorate the handful of pioneers in 
1901 who, inspired by Marconi* the father oT 
wireless communications, grew into an inter- 
national fraternity. 

In those days, all transmitting and receiv- 
ing apparatus had to be assembled by hand, 

and there were few 
books and no maga- 
zines on the subject. 
Because of hams, 




many new inventions came into existence. 
For example, hams were the first to discover 
the value of shortwaves, which opened the 
way for TV and FM broadcasting. And it wiis 
a ham who helped track the first satellite. 

The wartime stamps are well-taken, since 
World War 11 saw over 25 1 000 hams in uni- 
form designing * 4 comrno* equipment, set- 
ting up global networks, and manning radar 
installations. 

Israel honored its amateur radio operators 
in 1987. The Palestine Radio Club was orga- 
nized during the British Mandate, and even- 
tually became the Radio Amateur Associa- 
tion of Israel. These hams played an 
important role in laying the foundations of the 
Army Signal Corps* as well as the civilian 
communication network during the early 
years of the state of Israel. The association 
has 900 members. 700 of which hold official 
license^ 

Ascension Island issued a stamp in 1982 
showing King George V making his first 
Christmas BBC radio broadcast to the em- 
pire, 

A variety of old ham equipment is por- 
trayed on some stamps. This adds to their 
collectibility. Even Disney's Chip and Dale 
get into the act on the Bhutan stamp shown. 

Your Own Collection 

If you want to start your own stamp col- 
lection, consult a stamp catalog (such as 
Scotfs. Gibbons, or Minkus) in your local 
library. It lists or illustrates all stamps and 
their official call number and current 

value. The 
catalog is 
revised an- 
nually to 
include all 
new stamps 
and price 
changes. 
Subscribe 
to a good 




ANTARCTIC TERR| 

r # J ■ r J- J- ~- J- .' 






I 



weekly stamp newspaper (such as Linn's)* 
which you can also look over at most li- 
braries. Search their ads for dealers who spe- 
cial izc in the nations whose stamps you need. 
You can mail-order stamps, too* 

You can also subscribe to a "new issue' 
postal service. The service will send you all 
the new ham issues as soon as they are re- 
leased. 

Visit a local stamp shop. They may have a 
good selection- You may be able to fill out 
some blank spaces in your collection. Used 
stamps are cheaper than new, mint stamps. 

Stamps should be stored in three-ring plas- 
tic sheets with windows to protect the stamps 
from creasing, humidity, and dust. These 
sheets can be kept in a loose-leaf notebook. 

Accidental Benefits 

The greatest monetary profits lie in print- 
ing errors. Once a man in London bought a 
sheet of 100 nine-cent stamps. When he got 
home, he found that no price had been printed 
on them. A stamp shop bought the sheet for 
560,000. 

Another example: In 1918, the U.S. air- 
mail stamp of the Jenny plane was printed 
upside down. Today, one of those stamps 
sold at a recent auction for $148,000! 

Some ham club bulletins carry columns 
dealing with philately, and others carry stamp 
news over the airways, as they do in Canada. 
Sweden, Cuba, Czechoslovakia, Berlin, East 
Germany, Bulgaria, Belgian, and Portugal. 

As a ham* you'll have a special advantage. 
You'll be able to ask ham philatelists to send 
you ham stamps from their countries. You'd 
even be able to trade your duplicates world- 
wide. 

Few hobbies are more rewarding and use- 
ful than ham radio, with its friends, fun, and 
excitement. An interest on the side in philate- 
ly will add to the fun. Tunc in and see. 



Stamps from ail over the world, fumaring amateur radio and hams. 

14 73 Amateur Radio Today * June. 1991 



You mav reach Raymond Schuessler at P. O, 
Drawer 69, Lake Helen FL 32744-0069. 



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Technical support may be obtained 
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Technical Support & Sales: (206) 775^7373 Fax: (206) 775-2340 

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16 73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 



Feed b a ck 



In our continuing effort to present the best 
in amateur radio features and columns, we 
recognize the need to go directly to the 
source— you t the reader. Articles and 
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sion) to 73. 

To save on postage, why not fill out the 
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a damning or praising letter to the editor 
while you T re at it. You can also enter your 
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for the low* low price of 25 cents! 

Feedback^ Title 

1 Letters 

2 Never Say Die 
3QRX 

4 Three Bands With One Rock 

5 Review: KE2AM Voice ID and 
Repealer Controller 

6 Tune in on Philately 

7 A Pseudo CW Filter 

8 Build the Brass Pounder's Keyer 

9 SPSM Mobile Mount 

10 Review: Tripp Lite PR-25A Power 
Supply and Isobar 3 GS Surge 
Suppressor 

1 1 Parts Substitution 

1 2 Software for the Harnsback, Part It 

13 Review: SWISSLOG Version 3 66 

14 Barter *n' Buy 

15 Get on the WARC Bandwagon 

16 Homing In 

17 Hamsats 

18 Hams with Class 

1 9 RTTY Loop 

20 New Products 

21 Above & Beyond 

22 Special Events 

23 Ask Kaboom 

24 Looking West 

25 Updates 

26 QRP 

28 Ham Help 

29 Dealer Directory 

30 DX 

31 73 International 

32 ATV 

33 Random Output 

34 Propagation 




bffc U 



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73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 17 



^m 



Number 7 on your 



A Pseudo CW Filter 



Be good to your ears 

by Jim Melton WR5B 



To my ear, most CW filters have a more 
or less "ringing* 1 sound. Some opera- 
tors can live with it. but to me it's very dis- 
tracting. 

The circuit presented here is not actually a 
filter; hence, the name Pseudo Filter. It com- 
pletely eliminates the original CW signal and 
its normal background noise. At the same 
time, it uses the decoded signal to switch on 
and off the output of an 800 Hz oscillator. An 
added feature is that while tuning, it automat- 
ically zero beats with the received CW signal. 

About the Circuit 

The circuit is built around two 567 tone 
decoder ICs. Refer to Figure I for the 567 
pinouL The 567 contains a PLL (phase- 
locked loop) with a center frequency that can 
be set with one external series resistor- 
capacitor combination (R I , C2) and (R4, C7) 
to any frequency between 0.01 Hz and 500 
kHz. 

The approximate center frequency can be 
determined using the formula/ = I.l/RC, 
where/is the center frequency of the internal 
oscillator. Capacitors (C3, C4) and (C5, C6) 
set the capture bandwidth of the 567 IC any- 
where from zero to 14% of center frequency. 
The values shown in Figure 3, the schematic, 
set the bandwidth to the widest value, which 



TONE DECODtft 



'- - 



IMP 



INPUT 



{>- 



= .-- 



OUTPUT 



f.K-: 



' Timing 
" CA**ACiTQfl, 



TIMING 
«ES15TPH 



J 



Figure L Vie 567pmout. 



NOR CATC 


■ C*^ 


A B 


OUT 


L L 


H 


L 


L 


** L 


L 


M 


L 


IL *UJ*I 


1 H ■ NIGH | 



Figure 2, NOR gate truth table. 
18 73 Amateur Radio Today ■ June, 1991 




Photo. The Pseudo Filter installs easily in a 
speaker enclosure. 

gives a "lock on* 1 of a little over 100 Hz for 
an 800 Hz tone. 

Since we're interested in an audio frequen- 
cy, we take the input to the 567 directly from 
the speaker jack of the receiver. The 567 is 
designed so that pin 8 goes low when the input 
frequency is within the passband. Pin 8 is an 
active low output. This means it goes from 
near the positive supply voltage to ground 
through an internal open collector transistor 



switch when a tone is detected. When this 

happens, its associated LED will glow as long 
as the CW signal is present. 

SetUp 

Adjusting the two 567 center frequencies is 
much easier if you have access to an audio 
frequency generator and a frequency coun- 
ter* Hook up the frequency counter to pin 5 or 
6 of Ul and adjust for a center frequency of 
775 Hz with Rl , move your counter probe to 
pin 5 or 6 of U2 and set itto a center frequen- 
cy of 825 Hz with R4. At these settings, the 
two frequencies should overlap approximate* 
ly 50 Hz. If you don't have access to either of 
these instruments, try setting Rl to 13.33k 
ohms, and R4 to 14. 19k ohms* On the two 
units I built, these values put me in the ball 
park. You might have a friend send you some 
code while you do a little "tweaking" of the 
two-variable resistors until you are satisfied 
with the operation of the unit. 

Circuit Operation 

In operation, audio from the receiver is 
connected through a 0, 1 [IF capacitor to the 



AUDIO 



-)h 



m 



0i 



*TOC 
— -,'.% — 



V 55 



%■ 



C5 



367 



— -«L*W 



? + 



- 






* CT 
0-1 








CM 
220^F 

a^ci-4 

m 2 20* F 

16V 



*9V 



Fl 
SA 



SWJ 



IfTVAt 



«S#27J 



si 

-1385- \\ 



1 



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Ci L ' 
'JOQOpf 



_f 



-cu 



03 -D* 

*2^nS2 



Figure 3. The schenmtk for the Pseudo Filter. 



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Figure 4. PC board foil pattern. 



input (pin 3) of each 567 IC. When the re- 
ceived signal is approximately centered be- 
tween the two 567 frequencies (775 and 825 
Hz) , pin 8 of both JCs will go low . These pins 
arc connected to pins I and 2, respectively, of 
U3-a. which is 1/4 of a quad two-input NOR 
gate. Both inputs to this gate must go low for 
the output (pin 3) to go high. See the truth 
table for a NOR gate in Figure 2, 

U3-b is connected to function as an invert- 
er. An inverter is necessary because the 555 
timer IC generates a continuous audio fre- 
quency, and without the inverter you would 
hear a steady tone interrupted only in unison 
with die received CW signal. Try copying 
code that way sometime! 

The audio frequency generated by U4 is 
controlled by a PC mount trimmer. R5. Ad- 
just R5 for either 800 Hz, or any tone pleas- 
ing to you. Pin 1 1 of U3-b is the output of the 
inverter. This point then goes to pin 5 of U3-c. 
Pin 6 of U3-c goes to pin 3 of U4 t which is the 
output of the 555 timer, after some wave- 
shaping done by the RC combination of C9 
and R7. In the case of U3-c. pin 5 will remain 
low for the exact duration of each DIT/DAH 
signal. The other input to this gate, pin 6, 
fluctuates between the high and tow state 800 



times per second as a result of the audio signal 
generated by the 555 timer IC. 

Keep in mind that U3-c is being used as a 
digital switch. Therefore, instead of "key- 
ing" the audio oscillator on and off— its out- 
put, which is a continuous triangle wave, is 
simply switched in and out of die circuit 800 
times per second as long as a decoded CW 
signal is present. Last, the output of U3-c (pin 
4) is an 800 Hz square wave that is then 
amplified by U5, an LM386 audio amplifier. 

One last thing about U3: Ail unused inputs 
of this chip should be tied to either the supply 
voltage or ground, 
so connect pins 8 
and 9 to pin 7, and 
leave pin 10 open. 

I used the 555 
timer to generate 
the 800 Hz tone be- 
cause that hap- 
pened to be what I 
had on hand. Also 
keep in mind that 
the amplified 
square wave will 
sound just a tiny bit 
raspy. Admittedly. 



different ICs and an oscillator generating a 
pure sine wave could be used to follow the 
567 decoders; however, as I stated, I chose 
the least expensive route and used the compo- 
nents I had on hand. 

Don't be afraid lo experiment. On that 
same subject. I also had a 7809 voltage regu- 
lator—hence the 9 volt power supply, A 5 
volt supply would work just as well. But don't 
exceed 9 volts, as that is the maximum for the 
567 IC. As you can see in the schematic, the 
power supply is just a standard, full-wave 
regulated supply. 

Using the Filter 

The SPST switch is wired so that you can 
switch the speaker between the audio as re* 
ceived from the receiver— standard opera- 
tion—or audio only from the filter. Set the 
switch for standard operation, and as you 
slowly tune across a CW signal, either one or 
the other of the LEDs should start blinking in 
time with the received codes. Keep turning 
the dial slowly until the second LED starts 
blinking. At that point, switch to the filter 
audio, and the only sound you should hear is 
code— minus any hash or static. Also note 
that when both LEDs are blinking, you 
should be within approximately 25 Hz of zero 
beat. If you are answering a CQ, use only the 
tuning dial to zero in on the signal. If you are 
calling CQ, you will need to use the RIT 
control if your receiver is so equipped to 
fine-tune the answering call's frequency. Fi- 
nally, there is nothing critical in wiring. If 
you choose not to go with a PC board (see 
Figure 4), you can use either wire wrap or 
perf board. ■ 








la X > 




o ; 



■ :.. | 



\ 







[^ 



'V 0© 



, 



- 



U4 



m 



■ 





Figure 5, Parts placement. 
20 73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 





Pseudo Filter Parts List 


m,4 


20k PC mount potentiometer 


R2 T 3,9 


470 ohm resistor 


R5 


50k PC mount potentiometer 


R6 


1 k ohm resistor 


R7 


10k ohm resistor 


R8 


1 0k ohm panel mount audio taper potentiometer 


C1.9 


0.01 \if 


C2,7,8 f 10,13 


0.1 mf 


C3.6 


2.2 \if electrolytic or tantalum 


C4 t 5 


1 .0 nF electrolytic or tantalum 


C11 t C14 


220 liF/16V elect rolytic 


Ct2 


3000 \if electrolytic (see below) 


U1,2 


567 lone decoder IC 


U3 


4001 quad two-input NOR gate 


U4 


555 timer IC 


U5 


LM386 audio amplifier 


F1 


fuse holder 


SW1 


SPST switch 


SW2 


SPOT switch 


T1 


1 17V to 12,6V; 300 mA transformer 


D1-D4 


full-wave rectifier module 


VR1 


7805, 7808 or 7809 voltage regulator IC 


LEDs 


red (3) 


SPKR 


8 ohms 


It's OK to use three 1 000 \if capacitors for C1 2. You may also use 


Radio Shack 273-1385 for T1, and Radio Shack 276-1152 for the 


rectifier module. 




A blank PC board is available for $4 + $1 ,50 shipping per order 


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Number 8 on your Feedback card 



Build the Brass Pounder's Keyer 

A memory keyer that reproduces your true CW "fist " 



Dan Mc Cranie AA6GG 



Photo A, Vie Brass 
Pounder's Keyer, 




I've been in ham radio since I was \2 f and 
Tve always used a hand key for CW. My 
father was a chief radioman during WWII, 
When the family was back together after the 
war. he taught me the code and how to send 
on a hand key. There is a cadence and a 
distinct rhythm that you can detect when 
someone uses a hand key and, through the 
years in ham radio, I've really come to enjoy 
rag-chewing with other CW operators, and 
especially with the guys still using hand keys. 

This project is a little specialized. I started 
it a while back with the intention of building a 
solid-state keyer that would accu- 
rately record the th fist" of the op- 
erator, I realized that, In doing 
this, I wouldn't be maximizing the 
storage efficiency of the semicon- 
ductor memories— but I didn't 
care. Memories are getting cheap 
enough to allow for some ^pro- 
grammed inefficiencies/ 1 

The Brass Pounder's Keyer is 
the result of this effort. In design- 
ing the controls for the keyer, I 
tried to make the machine as user 
friendly as possible. Control 
switches closely resemble that of a 
tape recorder (record* playback, 
start, etc.), and the machine can be 
left installed between your hand 
key and your rig without affecting 
normal (non-keyer) operation. 

Theory of Operation 

The Brass Pounder's Keyer is a 
digital recorder that will accurate- 
ly reproduce the speed and ca- 
dence of the operator's keying. 
The heart of the circuit is a new 
type of semiconductor memory 
known as Electrically Erasable 
Programmable Read Only Memo- 
ry; or EEPROM. Data is written 
into this memory in much the same 
fashion as conventional semicon- 

22 73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 




Photo B. The assembled PC board. 





Brass Pounder's Keyer Parts List 


Part 




Description 


Manufacturer 


01 




NE 556 dual timer 


Signetics 


U2, U3. U4, 


US 


SN74L393N 4-bit counter 


Texas Instruments 


U6.U10 




SN74LS74N dual D type F/F 


Texas fnstruments 


U7,U11 




SM74LSMN quad N AND gate 


Texas instruments 


US 




SN74LSCWN hex inverter 


Texas Instruments 


U9 




PQ2816A16K EEPROM 


SEEQ Technology 


LM2 t U13 




SN74LS1 95 4-bit shift register 


Texas Instruments 


uu 




SN74LS244 octal transceiver 


Texas Instruments 


R1 




5.1 K 10% V* watt resistor 


Radio Shack 


P2 




56K 10% V* watt resistor 


Radio Shack 


R3, R3. R9. 


R11 


10K 10% »/4 watt resistor 


Radio Shack 


R4 




27K 10% tt watt resiStOf 


Radio Shack 


R5 




1 00K potentiometer 


Radio Shack 


R6.R7 




1 K 1 0% V4 watt resistor 


Radio Shack 


R10,R12 




200ft 10% ft waft resistor 


Radio Shack 


01,02X6, 


C7 


0.1 [if ceramic cap 


Radio Shack 


C3 




50 uF electrolytic 35V 


Radio Shack 


C5 




25 jiF electrolytic 35V 


Radio Shack 


S1 




DPDT miniature switch 


Radio Shack 


S2.S3 




SPST momentary push-button 


Radio Shade 


S4.S5 




SPDT miniature switch 


Radio Shack 


Q1,Q2 




2N2222A NPN transistor 


Texas Instruments 


D1 




red LED (20 mA) 


Radio Shack 


P1.P2 




miniature phone jacks 


Radio Shack 


The etched and drilled double-sided PC board is available for $18 from 


JOM Electronics, 


1 974 Alpet Drive, Morgan Mill CA 95037. Add 51 .50 for 


shipping. The U9 EEPROM is available from J DM Electronics for $7 (no 


charge for shipping). The complete Srass Pounder's 


Keyer is available in 


kit form (less chassis) from JDM Electronics for S70 unassembled and SS5 


assembled and tested, plus $2.50 shipping. 





ductor memories. Unlike conventional mem- 
ories, however, the EEPROM has the ability 
to retain previously stored information, even 
when power is removed. The EEPROM is 
guaranteed to hold this data for a minimum of 
10 years. In addition, contents of the EEP- 
ROM data can be rewritten up to 10,000 
times. By using this type of memory , power 
can be removed from the device at any time, 
and for any length of time. 

For this project, I chose a SEEQ Technolo- 
gy PQ2816A I6K-bit EEPROM, This is the 
smallest density manufactured by the compa- 
ny, and is available at a reasonable price. 
This density provides for over four minutes 
of recorded code. The next size larger would 
be the PQ2864 64K-bit EEPROM. providing 
for over 16 minutes of recorded code, but I 
Felt that for most contest applications, four 
minutes was more than adequate, See Figure 
1 for a functional block diagram of the Brass 
Pounder's Keyer. 

Record and Playback Clocks and Modes 

Two clocks are used in the keyer: a fixed 
frequency clock for recording, and a variable 
clock to allow the operator to vary 
the playback speed of the recorded 
message. The speed of the record 
clock is set to provide high repro- 
duction accuracy, even at speeds 
up to 30 wpm. The variable clock 
can change the playback output 
speed from one-third to over twice 
that of the original recorded sig- 
nal 

Record and play logic provides 
the controls necessary for either 
loading data into, or retrieving 
data from, the EEPROM. The 
EEPROM is a byte parallel ran- 
dom access memory device. As 
such, each byte (8 bits) has a 
unique address location in the 
memory. Data comes from the 
hand key in bit serial mode. The 
output is either a logical " T* {key 
depressed), or a logical "•" {key 
up). 

[n order to store the continuous 
stream of bit serial key data into a 
byte parallel random access EEP- 
ROM, it is necessary to do two 
things: First, die individual bits 
have to be collected and temporar- 
ily stored until a full byte is avail- 
able to load into the memory; sec- 
ond, the address locations have to 
be sequentially presented to the 




r«j 



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ELECTRONICS INC. 

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List price S509.95/CE price S239.95/SPECIAL 
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Excludes 823.9875-849 01 25 and 86B.9& 75-894 Qt25 MHz 

The Bearcat 200XLT sets a new standard tor hand- 
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This full featured unit has 200 programmable 
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List price $549.95/CE priceS239.95/SPEClAL 

t2'Band, 40 Channel • Ho- crystal scanner 

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Now... nothing excluded in the 800-9*2 MM* band. 

The Uniden 800XLT receives 40 channels fn two banks. 

Scans 15 channels per second SizeSW x4Va" * l2'/»." 

If you do not need the 800 MHz, band, a similar model 

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NEW! RELM* RH256NB-A NEW! Uniden' MR8100-A 



List price S44995/CE price S299.95/SPECJAL 
10 Channel • 25 Watt Transceiver • Priority 
Time-out timer • Off Hook Priority Channel 
The RELM RH256NB is the updated version of tne 
popular flELM RH256B Sixteen-channel VHF land 
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This transceiver even has a priority function. Be 
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part # PI2S0N for $1000 and a service manual 
part # SMHH258N for$24.95 for the RH256NB, A 
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16 channel similar version of this radio called the 
LMUl 5B*A Is also available and covers 4&0-482 
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the LMUl 5B UHF transceiver 

NEW! RELM® LMV2548B-A 

List price S423.33/CE price $289.95, SPECIAL 
4tf Channel a 25 Watt Transceiver a Priority 

RELM's new LM V2 548 B gives yoti up to 48 channels 
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for 37-50.000 MHz, is also available for $489.95, 



Call 313-996-3888 for special CEI pricing 
T 2- Bend, 1QO Channel * Surveillance scanner 
Bands 29-54. 116-174. 408*512. BQ6-9S6 MHz 
The Uniden MRS 100 surveillance scanner is different 
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use Ihis scanner offers a breakthrough of new and: 
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ot the Uniden MR81 00 a computer interlace program is 
available for $19.95 Due to manufacturers' territorial 
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NEW! Ranger RCI2950-A3 

List price S54995/CE prtce 5259.95/SPECIAL 
10 Meter Mobile Transceiver a Digital VFQ 
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Freouencf Coverage 28 0000 MHz to 29 5999 MHz. 

The Ranger RC 12950 Mobile 10 Meter Transceiver 
has everything you need for amateur radio com- 
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RC 12950 allows you to adjust the RF output power 
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technical info, call Ranger at 619-259-02Q7. 




RELM 
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OTHER RADIOS AMD ACCESSORIES 

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BC70XLT-A Bearcat 20 channel scanner $159.95 

BC1 42XL-A Bearcat 1 ch. 10 band scanner , . SB4.95 
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Add $4.00 shipping for all accessories ordered at the seme time. 
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BUY WITH CONFIDENCE 

Michigan residents please add 4% sales tax ot supply your 
lax LD number Written purchase orders are accepted from 
approved government agencies and most welt rated firms at 
a 10% surcharge for net 10 bilhng. AH sales are subject to 
availability, acceptance and verification Prices terms and 
specifications are subject to change without notice All 
prices are <n u 5 doners Out of stock items will be placed on 
backorder automatical or equivalent product substituted 
ess CEI n instructed differently- A S5 00 additional hanc- 
img fee will be charged lor all orders with a merchandise 
total under S50, 00. Shipment sate FOB. CEI warehouse rn 
Ann Arbor. Michigan No CODs Not responsible for typo- 
graphical errors 

Mail orders to: Communications Electronics? 
Box 1045, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 U.S,A. Add 
$15.00 per radio for UPS. ground shipping and 
handling in the continental U.S.A. For Canada. 
Puerto Rico, Hawaii. Alaska, or APO/FPO delivery, 
shipping charges are two times continental U.S. 
rates. If you have a Discover, Visa, American Express 
or MasterCard, you may call and place a credit card 
order. 5% surcharge for billing to American Express. 
For credit card order, calf tol htree in the U.S. Dial 
8GOUSA-SCAN. For information calE 31 3-996-8888. 
FAX anytime, dial 31 3-663-8888. Order today. 

Scanner Distribution Center" and CEI logos are trade- 
marks or Com municalions Electronics Inc. 
Sale dates 3/ 1 5, £ > — 1 0/3 1 / 9 1 AD * 03259 1 -A 

Copyright £ 1901 Communications Electronics Inc. 

For more information call 

1 -31 3-996-8888 

Communications Electronics Inc. 
Emergency Operations Center 

P.O. Box 1045 Q Ann Arbor, Michigan 4B106-1D45 USA. 
For orders call 31 3*996-8386 or FAX 31 3-663-8838 

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10 BU COUNTER 










CLOCK W7 PIN &} 



BIT CLOCK (*2) 



Figure L Functional hiock diagram of Brass Pounder's Keyer. 



BYTE CLOCK 



5Mirr/L0*fl ANP 
WfltTE CONTftQL 
PULSE 



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EtyttlddftSS .:;-.•'-; Increments T allow mg negative transition 



Figure 2. Timing diagram for shift /load/write com rot. 



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EEPROM in order to seamlessly transfer the 
serial stream into the memory . 

The first task of collecting the serial data 
imo 8-bit bytes is accomplished by a shift 
register controlled by the record clock. The 
data recorded in the shift register is a logical 
"1" when the key is depressed, and a logical 
4 "0" when the key is open. After eight clock 
pulses, the shift register has a complete byte 
of information and is ready to be transferred 
to an address location in the EEPROM. This 

24 73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 



Figure 3. Schematic diagram. 

is accomplished by the record/play control 
logic, which momentarily inhibits shifting of 
any new serial data into the register, loads the 
contents of the shift register into one of the 
1,024 memory locations of the EEPROM. 
and moves the EEPROM address to the next 
highest address by incrementing the 10-bit 
counter. All of this operation is performed 
synchronously between the end of the eighth 
shift register clock pulse, and before the be- 
ginning of the next shift register clock pulse. 



This will allow for continuous recording of 
the keyed data. 

In the record mode, the keyer will, once 
started, continue to "walk" through all 
1.024 address locations, recording all data 
presented to the input of the shift register. 
This takes approximately two minutes. At the 
completion of the 1 ,024th address, the clocks 
will automatically stop and recording is com- 
plete. 

In playback mode, a reverse operation is 




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GND 



TO R5 




KEY 
OUT 



COMPONENT SIDE 




SOLDER SIDE 



Figure 4. PC board foil patterns. Top layer (a} and bottom layer fb). Note: All pads on top layer must 
be soldered. Letters "A ' through *D * indicate juniper locations. 

26 73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 



needed. In this case, the data stored in 

the EEPROM will be coming out in byte 
parallel format and will have to be con- 
vened to bit serial. This is accomplished 
by first downloading the byte informa- 
tion from the EEPROM into the same 
shift register originally used to collect a 
byte of data from the input serial stream. 
and then serially shifting this informa- 
tion out to the key input of your rig. 

In the playback mode, the play clock 
allows the operator to vary the playback 
speed. The play clock and the record/ 
play control first transfer the contents of 
the first address location of the EEP- 
ROM lo the shift register. This transfer 
is done between normal shift clock puls- 
es, so as to make playback seamless. 
Following loading of the shift register, 
the data is then shifted out to the key-out 
jack. At the end of the eighth shift, the 
address counter is incremented and the 
next byte of information is loaded into 
the shift register, This process is contin- 
ued until all 1*024 memory locations 
have been loaded and shifted to the kev- 
out jack, at which time the keyer auto- 
matically stops. 

Operation 

The complete Brass Pounder's Keyer 
schematic is shown in Figure 3. Inte- 
grated circuit Ul is a NE556 dual timer 
that provides both the record and play 
clocks. The clock output of pin 5 is con- 
trolled by Rl, R2 and CI . The values of 
these circuits provides a clock of ap- 
proximately 50 He. R3, R4, R5 and CI 
provide the variable clock with an ap- 
proximate frequency range of 20 to 200 
Hz, The record clock of 50 Hz was se- 
lected to provide high resolution of in- 
coming hand-key code of up to 30 wpm, 
while still allowing a total of four min- 
utes of recording from the EEPROM 
memory, 

Qoek selection, memory write and 
register load signals are provided by U2 T 
U7, U6, and a portion of U8. The clock 
selection circuit of U7 is controlled by 
the record/play switch, S4. The chosen 
clock appears at pin 8 of U7. The clocks 
are turned on by control signals applied 
lo pins 4 and 10 of U 1 . This is controlled 
by flip/flop U10. The clock starts when 
S3 is momentarily depressed and will 
run until the 1 ,024th count . At the end of 
the 1,024th count, the low-to-high tran- 
sition at Pin 8 of US will flip U10 and 
stop the clocks at U L The clocks can be 
restarted by momentarily depressing 
S3 t thus resetting the U 10 flip/flop. 

The flip/flops and the 4-bit counter at 
U2 are used to provide the shift register 
toad/EEPROM write pulse. This design 
was used to provide a synchronous con- 
trol pulse between bit clock shifts and 
memory address byte shift commands. 
The output control pulse is present at pin 
3 of Uli. Figure 2 shows the timing 
diagram. This control pulse is applied to 
the EEPROM write enable signal (pin 





Atinco's New DJ-F1/F4T Realized 
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of Features including: 

*40 Memory Channels store Frequen- 
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ting, Tone encoder/Tone decoder 
setting (with optional Tone squelch unit), 
DSQ setting, Tone frequency and Off- 
set frequency independently. 

'Digital Signal Display and Memory 
Function 
The DJ-F1T/F4T has special 
memory channels for transmitting, 
receiving, and store "Two Digit" 
DTMF Tones, for communication 
messages. This feature allows 
for the DJ-F1T/F4T to receive a 
Two Digit" message and dis- 
play it at any later time, at the 
convenience of the operator. 

*Wide Band Receiving 
range 

F1T: 140- 170MHz (AM Mode 

11 8*1 36MHz after modifi- 
cation) 
F4T:43(M60MHz 



* Battery Pack Lock 

* Pager and Code Squelch 

*Triple Stage Selective Power Output 
*5W Output Power with Optional 
Battery Pack EBP-18N 
*8 Scan Modes 

* Programmable VFO Range Func- 
tion 

•Battery Save Function 
*Six Channel Steps - 5, 10, 12.5, 
15, 20, and 25KHz 
•Priority Function (Dual Watch) 
•Automatic Power Off (Pro- 
grammable Timed) 
'Automatic Dialer Function 
"Illuminated DTMF Keypad 
*Many Optional Accessories 
such as: 

EMS-8: Remote Control 
Speaker/Mi c. 

EME-11:Earphone/Mic, with 
PTT/VOX 

EM E- 10: Headset with PTT/VOX 
EJ-2U:Tone squelch Unit 
EDC-33:Quick Charger (Com* 
patible with standard battery 
pack) 

and many more. * . , . 




DJ-S1T/S4T is Simple Type and 
Low-Priced But Offers Features 
such as: 

' 5 W Output Power with Optional Bat- 
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• Triple Stage Slectfve Power Output 
•Dry Cell Battery Case Lock 

• Programmable VFO Range Function 

• Frequency Lock, PTT Lock Function 
•One Touch Squelch De-Activation 

Function 

• 8 Scan Modes 
•Wide Band Receiving Range 

Available Features with Optional 
DTMF Unit (DJ-10U) and DTMF Key- 
pad (ESK-1) Include: 

• Pager and Code Squelch 
•Digital Signal Display and Memory 

Function 

• Automatic dialer Function 

•Many Optional Accessories 
Available 

•Specifications 
Frequency Range: 

DJ-F1T/S1T 

TX: 144-1 48MHz 

RX: 140-1 70MHz (AM Mode 

11 8-1 36MHz after Modification) 

DJ-F4T/S4T 

TX:440-450MHz 

RX:430-460MHz 
Output Power: 

• with Battery Pack EBP-16N (Standard 
for F1T/F4T) 

Hi;2W(F1T/S1T) 1.5W{F4T/S4T) 
Mid:1W Low:0.1W 

•with Optional Battery Pack EBP-18N 
Hi:5W Mid:1W Low:0.1W 

• at 9V 
Hi:2.5W(F1T/SlT) 2W(F4T/S4T) 
Mid:1W Low:0.1W 

Weight: 
DJ-F1T/F4TApprox + ;13.2 02.: 
wrth Standard Battery Pack 
DJ-S1T/S4T Approx.:i3oz.: 
with Dry Battery case 

Dimensions: 
4.3(H) * 21(W) x 1.5(D) inch 
(Without Projections) 

Specifications and features are guaran- 
teed for amateur bands only and sub- 
ject to change without notice, 

ALINCO ELECTRONICS INC. 

438 AMAPOLA AVE. LOT 130 
TORRANCE, CALIFORNIA 90501 

Phone; 213-618-8616 

FAX : 213-618-8758 

STAY TUNED with 

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MEMORY 




- \ bio 1 - °*r*ou* 



O SrfG 



FignreS. Parts placement t component side f. Lines indicate jumper wire heat ions. 



21 of U9), as well as the shift/ register load 
control pi n 9 of U 1 2 and U i 3 . 

ICs U3, U4 and U5 form the 1 0-bit counter 
used to increment the address data for the 
EEPROM U9. The outputs of the 10-bit 
counter are fed into the address inputs of the 
2816 EEPROM. 

Data from the operator is entered into Jl. 
The power switch. S I , is a DPDT device that 
allows the key 10 be "hard wired'* directly to 
the key-out jack when the keyer is turned off. 
C3 and R4 are used to provide a momentary 
reset pulse to all flip/ flops, counters and reg- 
isters when power is first applied, 

During record operation, data is fed into 
the first 4-bit shift register U 12, and clocked 
by the bit clock applied from U2 pin I . In the 
record mode, transceiver U14 is presenting 
output data from U 12 and U 1 3 in anticipation 
of the memory load pulse. This is accom- 
plished by applying a low signal at pins 1 and 
19 of U 14. 

At the end of the eighth bit clock, a write 
enable control pulse is generated from Ul 1 
pin 3, The EEPROM U9 then automatically 
latches address and data signals, erases previ- 
ous contents in the addressed byte, and writes 
the data presented in the I/O lines to the 
previously specified address from U3 t U4 
and 05, 

This record cycle will repeat until the coun- 
ters U3, U4and U5 complete 1 ,024 counts, at 
which time a low -to-high transition of U5 pin 
8 will flip U 10 and stop the clocks at U I 

The 2816 EEPROM (U9) is capable of 
storing 2,048 bytes of data t enough for four 
minutes of code. In the hand keyer, I elected 

28 73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 



to have a hard wire selection of two mes- 
sages, each approximately two minutes long. 
Message selection is accomplished by S5, 
which is tied to the highest order address pin 
of U9, If your application requires a single 
longer message, S5 can be removed and pin 
19 of U9 can be attached to U5 pin 8. In this 
mode, U5pin 1 1 should be connected directly 
to UIO pin 3. These connections will allow 
for a single message in excess of four min* 
utes. 

During playback mode, data from the 28 16 
EEPROM is presented to U12 and Ul3 t and 
block4oaded by the load control signal ap- 
plied to pin 9 of U 1 2 and U 1 3 . Data is then 
clocked out serially to J2 via the play bit 
clock. 

The control gate of Ull pin 6 inhibits shift- 
ed data from being presented to the output 
during the record mode and, instead, presents 
the key-in signal directly to the key-out jack. 
The reason for doing this is to allow the 
operator's keying to be directly presented to 
the rig so that the audio tone is coincident 
with the operator's keying. When I first 
breadboarded the Brass Pounder's Keyer, I 
didn't have this feature, so 1 "heard" my 
keying delayed by eight-bit clock limes (ap- 
proximately one-quarter of a second). From 
firsthand experience, 1 can tell you that it's 
difficult to key code when the audio feedback 
is delayed by a quarter of a second! This 
circuit eliminated that phenomenon. 

Another feature of this circuit is that it 
allows you to "send over" 1 your recorded 
message. I found this useful, for example, 
when injecting RSTdata into my canned first 



response on CW QSOs. 

Transistor Ql is a garden variety 
2N2222A with a small collector resistor 
R 10, just in case I accidentally connect the 
output jack directly to a high -current 
voltage source. 

The Brass Pounder's Keyer is powered 
by a 5 volt power supply. For my applica- 
tion, I connected directly to a 5 volt power 
supply, I also experimented with using 
four 1 .5 volt A A Alkaline batteries, with a 
silicon diode in series with the load to 
drop the output voltage to approximately 
5.4 VDC. The hand keyer consumes ap- 
proximately 100 mA in standby, and 
about 1 60 in record or play . I ran the hand 
keyer continuously with these batteries 
and found that the battery life was equiva- 
lent to about 250 continuous messages. 
With my C W activity, I felt that 1 could do 
at least 250 messages in about three 
months, so I elected to use Ehe power 
supply* If your usage is significantly less, 
and you don't have a 5 volt power supply 
in your shack , perhaps the internal battery 
pack would suit the application. Power 
dissipation can be reduced, obviously by 
removing the LED indicators, A more 
significant reduction can be achieved by 
replacing the low power Schottky devices 
with CMOS logic. The ready availability 
and extreme low cost of 74LS logic, how- 
ever, was more personally persuasive 
when I did the first design. 

Construction 

For my prototype, 1 chose to use wire 
wrapping. The advantages of wire-wrapping 
the keyer are both speed and density, I was 
able to mount the wire-WTap sockets on the 
punched phenolic board and wire-wrap all 14 
sockets in one evening, In addition, I could 
place the ICs side by side for maximum pack- 
ing density. 

The disadvantage is cost. The wire-wrap 
sockets ended up costing me more than some 
of the TTL 74LS products! The speed of 
assembly, however, finally persuaded me to 
use wire wrapping. 

Another potential disadvantage (for those 
of us whose mind wanders from time to time 
during construction) is during trouble shoot- 
ing. Digital circuits can behave very strange- 
ly with just one wire-wrap error, and finding 
the error in the rat's nest of a typical wire- 
wrapped board is a real challenge. 

I completed the wire- wrapping project with 
(for me) the normal amount of de-bug 
headaches. To minimize construction prob- 
lems for 73 readers, we decided to contract 
a printed circuit board design for this project, 
using Fred Reimers of FAR Circuits, The 
resulting double-sided board is shown in 
Figure 4. {Note: Since the PC board doesn 't 
have plated-through holes, it is necessary to 
solder the fC pins on the top layer as welt, 
wherever a pad exists. Likewise ; solder any 
wires both top and bottom if there is a pad on 
the top layer. Also be sure to run jumper wires 
between the lettered points as shown in Fig- 
ure 5, Although the jumper wires in Photo B, 

Continued on page 32 



DIGITAL VOICE RECORDER 



VERY SIMPLE 



Diu> t<i its advanced circuit design, the 
operation of ihe DVM-58C Digital Voice 
Recorder is as easy as 1-2-3. 

1. Connect DC power source 

2- Hook up a microphone 

'i. Start recording 

land, believe it or not, it's done! ) 



VERY USEFUL 



When you need something for your 
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t>. Verhal instruction and warning 
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following features; 

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w 4 Mega DRAM, 

• On board 0.5W audio amplifier w/ 
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• ADM (Adaptive Delta Modulation!. 

• Selectable 16K/32K bps sampling rnh\ 

• Memory expendable up to 4 Mega 
DRAM which gives you total of 2 
minutes recording at :i2K bps. 

• Selectable "REPEAT* mode switch. 

• 1 t> variable length messages each w 
direct triggering terminal enables you 
to play back any one of the messages 
hi anvtime you want - instant b 

• Selectable "VOX - automatically starts 
recording when you sim? talking. 

• 'AITOMATIC RESET" simplifies single 
message recording operation, 

» KOS (End of Sentence! output lets you 
control other device at end of the 
message in play back mode. 

• "ENDI-KSS RECORDING" option allows 
continuous recording that can be 
stopped at any time lo renew past 
conversation. 

• Reserved ;pace for OJF 5.5V Gold 

i ajiacitor used for memory back-up 
System during short power failures. 

• PCB dimensions 5.75" X 2.75" X 0.5". 



RE-DEFINING 

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CIRCLE 297 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



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AP-2 SIMPLEX AUTOPATCH Timing 
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A New Amateur Radio Magazine ! 




Here's your chance to subscribe at a 
pre-publication rate to a brand new ham 
publication. The Premiere Issue alone 
should turn out to be worth several times 
the subscription price! The first issue of 
73 is going for hundreds of dollars these 
days. 

The pre-publication subscription price 
is only $9,97 for 12 issues! Not only that, 
but you 11 get at least $25 in discount 
coupons as a bonus. That's right, you'll 
be able to save over double the subscrip- 
tion price when you order from Uncle 
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supporting advertisers. 

SO, WHAT'S IN IT? 

If we sent you blank pages it would be 

a bargain, so what's the difference? 
Well, if you insist on looking a gift horse 
in the mouth, to coin a phrase, okay, 
here's what's in store for you. 

First out. Radio Fun is aimed at help- 
ing newcomers to amateur radio to both 
get their higher class licenses and to have 
more fun with the tickets they have. This 
means we'll be running simple theory 
articles to help you actually learn how 
electronics and radio work. That's a lot 
belter than memorizing the Q&A ba- 
loney and feeling dumb for the rest of 
your life. We're talking simple, so don't 
panic. Much of this will be the same as 
we'll be using to teach 5th-8th grade 
students about electronics and communi- 
cations. 

No, it isn't going to be all theory. The 
name is Radio Fun , so we'll be review- 
ing every kit we can get our hands on. 
The idea is to get you to buy, assemble 
and use all kinds of gadgets - some for 



amateur radio, some not. There's noth- 
ing like building to actually get familiar 
with electronics and turn book theory 
into practical understanding. 

We'll have columns on activities 
which are geared to Novices and Techs. 
We'll be trying to get you involved with 
repeaters, packet radio, SSB on 2m, 
satellite communications, DXing on 
10m, and stuff like that. We'll also be 
urging you to forget how much you hate 
the code and learn it Uncle Wayne's way 
so you can go on to General and Ad- 
vanced tickets. How else can we get you 
up on 1 5m and 20m so you can help clean 
up the mess the Extras have made of 



those bands? Wc need your help. . .badly. 

Yes, well be running stuff on QRP 
(rigs running under one wan), on hidden 
transmitter hunting, on how to cope with 
overbearing old timers at ham club meet- 
ings, on how to find parts, on how to put 
up simple antennas. . .things like that. 

The Premiere Issue will be out in late 
April and the regular monthly issues will 
start in September. If you pass up this 
one you'll never forgive yourself. Just 
send your order with payment and we'll 
see that you get the big Premiere Issue, a 
wad of discount coupons, and our eternal 
thanks for helping a new ham publication 
get started . —Wayne W2 N S D 1 



r 



^tj^c^\ n ■ 12 issues of Radio Fun ' 

YJbo! Sign me up right now! for $9.97. . 



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Continued from page 2S 

were mounted on the bottom side (away from 

view}, it's easier to mount them on the top 
sideJWiih the PC board, I was able to build a 
second unit in about one hour . . .and I didn't 
go blind trying to correct any wire-wrapping 
errors. The board level product worked per- 
fectly. I built the board level keyer without 
using sockets. However, if you decide to use 
the printed circuit board, I recommend that 
you consider socketing all of the FCs. 

All of the components, with the possible 
exception of the 2816 EEPROM (U9), should 
be available either at Radio Shack or at most 
electronics parts stores. The 2816 EEPROM 
is a relatively new product and tends to be 
available only from industrial electronic dis- 
tributors, such as Anthem Electronics, Inc. 
For that reason, I can provide the part (see the 
Parts List), 

Operating the Brass Pounder's Keyer 

To use the keyer in your station, connect 
a cable between the key -out jack of the 
keyer and the key- in of your rig. Next, 
connect your hand key to the key-in jack of 



the Brass Pounder's Keyer, 

The keyer's controls are very straightfor- 
ward. For recording a message, select Mes- 
sage 1 /Message 2 f place the keyer in record 
mode and press the start switch. The keyer 
is now recording. Key In your message. At 
the completion of your message, wait until 
the keyer times out and the * "complete'" (red) 
LED is on* 

To play a recorded message over the air, 
select Message 1 /Message 2, place the keyer 
in play mode and momentarily press the 
start switch. The keyer will now play your 
previously recorded message. Speed of the 
playback is controlled by the 1 00k poten- 
tiometer. At the completion of your message, 
you may either wait until the keyer automati- 
cally times out, or depress the RESET button. 

The Brass Pounder's Keyer is wired so that 
normal hand key operation is possible 
whether the keyer is on or off. 

That's pretty much it. Good luck on the 
construction. 



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32 73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 



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SPSM Mobile Mount 

Build this reliable Hustler classic. 



by David A, Clingerman W60AL 



Many of us enjoy working mobile on a 
variety of HF bands, An average com- 
mute to work of, say, 10-20 miles will afford 
us a couple of QSOs before and after ihe work 
day, and maybe even a couple at noon. 

Often, the problem detouring a lot of mo- 
bile operation is the problem of how to mount 
the antenna. Of course, we all know the best 
way; bail mount on the rear deck of the vehi- 
cle. That's fine and lasts a long time, but do 
you really want to knock a hole in the rear 
deck of your new 558,000 Porsche? I didn't 
think so, and the housefrau probably doesn't 
either. 

The next best way is the bumper mount. 
Fine for an old pickup truck, but just try to get 
a chain or two around the bumper of some of 
today's sporty autos. It's next to impossible, 
but not totally impossible, if the auto has 
metal bumpers, But, usually, you 11 find 
they're made of some sort of high impact 
plastic that collapses or breaks under any sort 
of pressure. 

On down the list is the gutter clamp, Great 
to hold a 2 meter stinger in place, but it will 
only survive your 80 meter, high power, 
Hustler resonator and three- to four-foot ex- 
tension until you round a corner pulling about 
3 G*s. About that time, the entire lash-up 
parts from the vehicle from centrifugal force, 
gets airborne and spears the parking attendant 
a block away. Or it lies flat like a scythe, and 
decapitates the top of a camper. No real loss, 
but not conducive to your longevity. 

Like I said* the gutter clip is great for VHF 
stingers and UHF *'J's/ " but not for arrays of 
any substance. The list narrows; how about 
lip mounts? Trunk, hood, or whatever you 
can get a hold on, that wonderful little device 
that destroys metal with its nastv set screws. 
Is this the answer? Or is your Mercedes much 
too precious to invert^dimple for the sake of 
a few neat QSOs to while away the travel 
time? 



TOP PLATS 



Vn. 




J 



- OtUENStimS W WCWS- 



j/ifi 



r-WA DIA] 



|— 3>B-» 




Itt QIA 



^-lrt-»W 



1/1& 



' 



rSM- 




Figure L The fop plate. 
34 73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 



V \ 


* 

• 



J1_JLJLJI 




Photo A, The completed SBSM mobile instal- 
lation ready to hit the road. 



A Bargain Find 

At one time, Hustler made a lip mount of 
sorts that used a compression block of cy- 
clonic (resistant to wind damage?), high im- 
pact plastic instead of those nasty little set 
screws. However, when they moved their 
operations from Texas, they also cleaned 
house on a few products that weren't real 
movers. One of these items was the SPSM 
mobile mount. 1 picked one up from a bargain 
table for a dollar at R&L Electronics in 
Hamilton, Ohio, just because I'd never seen 
one before, and secondly because it was only 
a dollar. As things worked out, it was one of 
the best dollars I ever spent. 

A Pontiac Fiero, as some of you probably 
know, has an all -fiberglass body, a difficult 
thing to try to find a ground point on. But the 
SPSM mount worked just great on the rear 
deck, as there are two metal ventilators which 
actually attach somehow to chassis ground. 
Also, the SPSM can be compression-fit to a 
fiberglass edge, with a short piece of braid 
and ground clip attached to one of the ventila- 
tors. 

This mount worked great for supporting 
my Hustler RMX 10 meter antenna and a 
standard stainless steel (102") CB whip, 
though not both at the same time, 

I tired of the Fiero and purchased a van. 
The Plymouth Voyager has a lift-type rear 
door with edges that are just perfect for 
mounting the SPSM. The SPSM worked so 
well I wanted a second one for mounting my 2 
on the opposite side of the van. 



meter "J" 



Construction 

I contacted Hustler to see if they had any 
more SPSMs, or parts still around that 1 
might buy. They didn't have a trace, not even 
any drawings. Many years of special project 



work in the Navy taught me that if you need it 
and it doesn't exist, you have to build it your- 
self. After a few hours of sawing, tapping, 
and drilling, I had my very own SPSM 
mount. It was worth it, I feel this little mount 
is so versatile that I would like to share my 
construction with you. 

The Top Plate 

I acquired some strap stainless steel (1.2" 
wide x 0. 1875* thick x 36" long) at the local 
ACE hardware store for about S3. 50 and a 

couple of 1/4-20 stainless steel nuts and bolts 
for about SI. Using a band saw, I cut a 4" 
length of stainless from the flat stock. Then I 
rounded the corners with a bench grinder to a 
1/2" radius. Let's call this item the "top 
plate/' 

On each of the long side dimensions of the 
top plate, and evenly centered, I used a flat 
file to grind in 34 " long slots to a depth of 
3/16" . I then drilled two holes centered about 
JS" from each end of the top plate. Drill one 
of the holes to a diameter of 0*250" and the 
other to 0375 " . In the center of the top plate 
drill a 3/16" hole and tap it with a 1/4-20 die. 
See Figure 1 . 




Figure 2 (a). Side view of the Z-claw. (b)> Top 
view. 

The Z Claw 

I cut another piece of stainless from the flat 
stock. This one was 3" long. 1 rounded the 
corners on only one end to a radius of l/2\ 
Drill a 3/16" hole at a point W in from the 
rounded end. Then tap it for a 1/4-20 hole. I 
placed 1 " of this end in the vise to effect a 90 
degree bend using a ball peen hammer. Next, 
I placed the opposite end 1" in the vise, and 
made another 90 degree bend in the opposite 
direction of the first bend. This makes the 
device almost **Z" shaped. Fit call this piece 
the^Z-claw/' 



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931 Artificial ground. 1 .8 - 30Mhz. 

482 B Grandmaster memory keyer 

484C Grandmaster memory keyer. 

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CIRGL£ 153 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

36 73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 



The Z-claw should be placed with the top 
plate so that the I/4-20 holes line up. Grind 
the bottom side of the square end until it's 
sharp. Using a fiat file, your next task is to 
make four teeth in this sharp end. To do this, 
you need to file three notches l A n deep. Bend 
these teeth about 10 degrees toward the top 
plate, using the ball peen hammer. This com- 
pletes the Z-claw . See Figure 2. 

The Compression Block 

I didn't have any hard or "cyclonic" plas- 
tic around, so I used a piece of hardwood 
(maple) to produce the third device t known as 
the "compression block/ This object is 
drawn in Figure 3 t and is probably easier to 
see than to describe in words. I made it using 
a band saw, a drill press, and a flat file. First 
make two saw cuts about l h * deep into the 
wood block (vertical sections of the channel). 
Then take a wood chisel to chop out the chan- 
nel. If you take a look at Figure 3, you'll see a 
W diameter hole in the center of the com- 
pression block, Be careful to drill only to the 
depth shown in the drawing (%*), otherwise 
the compression block loses its compression. 

I cut a ** length from a % # O.D. steel rod 
and drilled it right down the center with a l A * 
drill (its "Z" axis) to a depth of W". About 
% " from the open end of this ' 'cup* " I drilled 
three holes 120 degrees from each other 
around the periphery, and tapped for 4-40 set 
screws. See Figure 4. 

I used a small triangular file to score a 
1/16* deep circular groove into a 1.5" long 
1 /4-20 bolt % " from its threaded end. Next, I 
screwed this "prepared bolt*' into the center 
hole of the top plate* all the way to the boh 
head. Slip the little cup affair with the three 



COUPPE SStO*t BLOCK 



V8 DlA *3'6DP HOLE 




Figure 3. The compression block. 

set screws over the bolt, and snug the set 
screws into the groove so that the cup can just 
barely turn freely. Press the cup affair into 
the H N diameter hole of the compression 
block and bottom it out, Then back out die 
1/4-20 compression block drive bolt until the 
hardwood compression block is snugged up 
against the top plate. 

Affix the Z-claw to the top plate with a 
1 /4-20 bolt and snug it to the point where the 
Z-claw swings freely beneath the top plate. 
The teeth of the Z-claw, as you 11 see, line up 
about the center of the bottom of the compres- 
sion block so that when the drive bolt is 
screwed toward the teeth, considerable com- 
pression can occur. You can use a locking nut 
beneath the head of the drive bolt and tighten 
it against the top plate if you want. I didn't use 
one because I felt that, especially under ten- 




Photo B. Closeup view of the SBSM mount. 

sion, the drive bolt was not likely to unscrew. 
Once you have affixed a small "ball mount 
assembly" to the top plate in its remaining 
hole, you will have created an SPSM jusi like 
Hustler used to make- See Figure 5, 

Application 

It's easy to install this device. You simply 
turn the Z-claw out from the compression 
block, and insert it under any metal or plastic 
lip of a vehicle. Swing the compression 
block/top plate assembly over the lip, align 
the compression block over the teeth of the 
Z-claw with the metal or plastic lip between, 
and tighten down on the compression block 
drive screw. The surface of the metal or plas- 
tic won 1 ! be harmed, or at least very little, by 
the hardwood compression block, 

The teeth of the Z-claw will dig in slightly 
to the underside of the lip, but that will not be 
in view, and if metal, it can be hit with a shot 
of Rustoleum™ to prevent any oxidation. The 
teeth digging into the metal will affect a good 
ground at the mount. Regardless of the posi- 
tion in which the SPSM is mounted, the small 
ball assembly will always have two degrees 
of freedom which should allow enough lati- 
tude for almost any situation you can imag- 
ine. All you have to do now is mount your 
mobile antenna and mobile away. 

My first test run in my vehicle to ascertain 
mechanical integrity entailed a trip down the 



Ct/P 



4-+0 SET SCREWS !** Lfi.- 
Ci PLACES) I2CT APART 

9'a 0.0, STEEL ROD 



|rt DI4 * 5'B DP 




0*iV£ SOU 



\/4-2Q X I \fZ LC BOLT 



Figure 4 (a). Details of the J 'cup ' ' construc- 
tion, (b). The completed drive boh arrange 
ntent. 





Parts List 


1 


Stainless steel strap 




(0.1825" thick), 1.2"Wx3'L 


2 


¥4-20x11/2* bolt 


1 


Length of H 1 * steel rod 


3 


4-40 x Va * set screws 


1 


Block of hardwood 




(rHx^'WxVA'L) 


1 


Ball antenna mount 



Santa Fe Trail, south out of Littleton, Colora- 
do* at a speed of about 60 MPH + Nothing fell 
off in the first few miles, so I tried a few 
QSOs to sec if the device would also work 
electronically. I made a number of contacts 
all over the country. My third QSO was with 
none other than Bill Brown WB8ELK in Han- 
cock, New Hampshire, giving a demonstra- 
tion of the 73 hamshaek to a group of stu- 



HAM RADIO CLASSIFIEDS 

the bi-weekly classified 
newsletter for ham radio operators 



Good luck in your construction endeavors 
and enjoy your mobile operations with the 
knowledge that your antenna will remain 
firmly in place! 



You may reach David A . Ctingemum W6GAL 
at 4725 M Qui?wytf!0I4, Denver CO 80236. 



1/4-20 BOLT/NUT 

DRIVE BOLT 




BALL MOUNT 



TOP PLATE 



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Figure 5, Final assembly of the mount. 






':ii^i. 



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Tt 



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420-5CM 1 


11 ELE FULL BAND 


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11 3 


$ 99,00 I 


440-18 


MULTI-USE 


1 1 , 4" 


148 


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30 ELE CIRC /OSCAR 


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J 



Effective 3/20/91 



CIRCLE 267 ON HEADER SERVICE CARD 



Number 1 on your Feedback card 



73 Review 



by David Cassidy N1GPH 



Tripp Lite PR-25A 

Power Supply and 

Isobar 8 GS Surge Suppressor 



Tripp Lite 

500 North Orleans 

Chicago IL 606 1 0-4168 

TeL (312) 329-1777; 

FAX (31 2) 644-6505. 

Price Class: PR-25A, S180; Isobar 8 GS, $1 1 5~ 



The PR-25A 

A good 1 2 volt power supply is probably the 
most used accessory in any ham shack. Just 
think of ail the things you call upon your power 
supply to run: HF rig, 2 meter gear, packet 

station, amplifier The lowly power supply 

just sits there, spitting out the amps, day after 
day, year after year. 

Unless you splurged and bought the match- 
ing 1 2 volt supply with your HF rig, your power 
supply probably tooks like a cross between a 
billboard and a refrigerator —a big metal cabi- 
net covered with all kinds of ominous writing. 
After all, it's only a power supply. Hook it up, 
throw it under the desk and forget it— right? 

The Tripp Lite company has recently up- 
scaled their line of power supplies, The new 
cabinets are an attractive charcoal color, to 
match modern communications equipment. 
Since power supplies in the 25 amp range 
seem to be the most versatile for amateur use 
{you can power everything from an HT to a 
standard 100W transceiver), I took a look at 
the Tripp Lite PR^25A (Tripp Lite offers sup- 
plies in 3—60 amp sizes, with prices starling 
at $38.50). 

The PR-25A is housed in a sturdy cabinet 
and weighs in at about 20 pounds. The cabinet 
is well ventilated, and even during all-after- 
noon sessions in the shack, it did not get more 
than slightly warm. Two rear-mounted bolts 
provide connection to your power cable. 




Photo B. The isobar 8GS surge suppressor. 
38 73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 



These bolts are clearly 
marked, so unless you're 
not paying attention, 
chances of reversing 
your power leads are slim 
(it's a good idea to always 
check one more time be- 
fore powering up your 
gear). A large rocker 
switch is the only thing 
(other than the company 
logo and model number) 
on the front panel, glow- 
ing red to show when the 
unit is turned on. 

The PR-25A is rated at 20 amps continuous 
duty cycle, so I tuned the RTTY portion of 15 
meters to see how it would measure up. Even 
during long transmissions of over five min- 
utes at 50 watts output, the PR-2SA never 
dropped below 22 amps and 13,1 volts. 
(Remember, even though we call them 12 volt 
supplies, they all provide 13.8 volts.) Even at 
short-duration, fuil-power transmissions (one 
to two minutes at 100 watts), the PR-25A con- 
tinued to provide a minimum of 22 amps and 
13 volts. 

I now have the PR-25A powering my packet 
setup (HT and 30 watt 2 meter amp), as well as 
a 45 watt 2 meter mobile rig \ can run all three 
pieces simultaneously, and the PR-25A never 
misses a beat. 



The Isobar 8 GS 

Most of us who use com- 
puters are familiar with 
surge suppressors, They 
protect delicate computer 
chips from the occasional 
voltage surge. These 
surges occur everywhere 
from time to time, and are 
more frequent in rural ar- 
eas (like where I live). If you 
plug your computer directly 
into your wall socket, it's 
only a matter of time before 
a line surge does some- 
thing nasty— from wiping 
out a file or hard disk, to 
frying your RAM chips. 




Photo A. The PR-25A power supply. 



Since modern ham transceivers are really 
computers (your average low-end transceiver 
has more computing power than an entire 
room full of early computers), I am often sur- 
prised to see hams going to all kinds of trouble 
to protect their computer and then simply 
plugging their transceiver into a wall socket 
(often on the same circuit with other high cur- 
rent appliances). The chips inside your HF rig 
are every bit as susceptible to line surge as 
your computer, and you ought to consider us- 
ing a surge suppressor, 

Tripp Lite's Isobar GS line offers a couple of 
unique features. Tripp Lite provides its Gold 
Seal Warranty on the complete line of Isobar 
GS surge suppressors. The warranty covers 
not only the Isobar itself, but any equipment 
plugged into the Isobar If surge damage oc* 
curs, the Isobar and the equipment will be 
repaired or replaced (contact Tripp Lite for 
details). 

The Isobar GS also features isolated filter 
banks, preventing connected equipment from 
causing interference with each other. What 
Tripp Lite calls "Cascade Circuitry" altows 
you to choose the amount of suppression you 
need for various pieces of equipment. For in- 
stance, the 8-outlet Isobar provides 50, 75, 
100 and 120 dB suppression. 

The Isobar GS is available in 2, 4, 6 and 8 
outlet models, with prices starting at $59.95. 
You'll feel better knowing that your expensive 
rig is protected from line surges. 



David Cassidy is the Associate Publisher of 
73 Amateur Radio Today. 




IC-765 Xcvr/ps/fceyer/tuner 



Regular SALE 
(Spa.) 3 149.00 2499 



■ . ■-•-• , — — 


— 


, .- - _ . - ~7 




^ ^ ^ ^ * * 







OOO^ -, „ 



^ - 



^ 



fC-78J Xcvr/ps/tunw /scope. ^ff^dj 6149.00 4999 




IC-751A 9-band xcvr/.l 30 MH* rcvr 169900 1399 

PS-35 internal power supply 219,00199" 

FL-63A 250 Hi CW filter (Is! IF) 5900 

FL-S2A 500 H* CW filter (2nd if).... 1 1500 109 n 
FL-5SA 250 Hz CW titter (2nd IF).... 115.00 109" 
FL-70 2.8 kHz wide SSB lifter 59 00 




IC 735 HF xcvr/SW revr/rnic 1149.00 969^ 

PS-55 External power supply 21900 199 15 

AM 50 Automatic antenna tuner .... 445.00 389" 

FU32A 500 Hz CW filter 69.00 

EX- 243 Electronic keyer unit 64.50 

UT-30 Tone encoder ,.,.... ; 18.50 

.. 949.00 799'- 

.. 489.00 429^' 

,. 129900 1089 



IC 725 HF acvr/SW rcvr 
AH-3 Automatic antenna tuner 

IC-726 10-band xcvr/6m 



pi ■ ■ ■ ■> 



i ■ r i ■ r -i 



IC-2K1 HF solid state amp w/ps„,.„„ 
IC-4KL HF 1KW amp */ps.... (ShM 
EX-627 tff auto. ant. selectoJ (Spee®!) 

PS-15 ?0A external power supply 

PS-30 Systems p/s w/cord, 6-pin plug 

SP-3 External speaker..... , 

SP-7 Small external speaker 

Cfi 64 High stab, ret xlal,751A. etc... 

SM-6 Desk microphone 

SM-8 Desk mic - two cables, scan 

AT- 500 500W 9 band auto, ant toner 
AH-2 8-band tuner w/mount & wtop... 
AB-2A Ant tuner system, only 



Regular SALE 

1999 00 1699 

6995.00 5795 

315.00 269" 

175,00 159" 

349 00 319" 

65,00 

5199 

79 00 

4795 

89.00 

589.00 519" 
758,00 689" 
559.00 499" 



Accessories for 1C-765/7S1/725 • Call for Prices 



• Large Stocks 
it Fast Service 

• Top Trades 




?COM 

VHF/UHF Base Trans rs Regular 

IC-275A 25w2m FM/SSB/CW w/ps_ 1299 00 
IC-275H 100* 2m FM/SSB/CW.„...„ 13990O 
IC-475A 25w 440 FM/SS8/CW w/ps t « 1399.00 
IC-475H IOOw 440 FM/SSB/CW (Spa) 1599.00 
IC-575A 25w6/lQmxcvr/ps ftpewl) 1 399.00 

JC-575H 25w lOOw 6/10m xcvr 1699.00 

IC-1275A 10W I ?GHz FM/SSB/CW... 1849.00 



J 



SALE 
1129 
1199 
1199 
1269 
1099 
1469 
1599 




I IF UHF M< "ransceivers 
IC-229A 25w 2m FM/TTP mic .. ($*k.) 
IC-229H 50w 2m FM/TTP imc~ (Sp*t.) 
IC-448A 25w 440 FM/TTP ... (Ckmt*) 
IC-1201 10W J2GH* FM xcvr , 

Dual-oand FM s 

IC-3220A 25w2m/440 FM/TTP mic... 
IC-3220H 45w 2m/35w 440 FM/TTP 

IC-24Q0A 2m/440 FM/TTP... (Sp&thf) 
IC-2500A 35w 440/UGHz FM ftp*.) 



Regular SALE 
449.00 319" 
479 00 379" 

599.00 469" 
799.00 699" 
Regular SALE 
659 GO 569 9b 
699.00 599^ 

899.00 639" 
999.00 849" 




MuHf-oand FM Transr- 

iC-901 2m/440 Fiber opt. xcvr ($pm.) 

UX-R91A Broadband receiver unit,. 

UX-19A 10* 10m unit 

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UX-S92A 2m SSB/CW module 

UX-39A 25* 220JV1HZ unit (Special) 

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larsen PO-K Roof mount 

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RP-L220 1 2GHz lOw repeater 



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1 193 00 

339.00 

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34900 

59900 

349.00 

TBA 

549.00 

Regular 

2895.00 

3149.00 

389.00 

999.00 

Regular 

39.00 

35.00 

23.00 

24.70 

28 75 

Regular 

1849.00 

1649.00 

229900 

2599.00 



SALE 
839" 
349" 
269" 
319" 
529" 
279" 

499" 

SALE 
2499 
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349" 
869" 

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1999 
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d handn^r Regular SALE 

A-2 5W PEP synth aircraft HT. ......... 525 00 479=- 

A-20 Synth, aircraft HT w/VOR (Spm) 625 00 499* s 



Call for information and Prices on 
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Regular SALE 

R 7000 25MHz-2GHz receiver.., 1199.00 1029 

RC-12 Infrared remote controller 70.99 

EX-310 Vorce synthesizer 59.00 

TV-R7000 ATVumt 139.00 129" 

RJ1A 100kHz-30MHz rcvr $999.00 869" 

RC-11 fnfrared remote controller... 7099 

FL-32A 500 Hz CW filter....... 69.00 

FL-63A 250 Hz CW filter (ht IF]..... 5900 

FL-44A SSB filter (2nd IF).... I7&OG 159- 

EX 257 FMtimt..... 49.00 

EX 310 Voice synthesizer. 59 00 

CR^64 Hfgh stability oscillator Hal 79.00 

SP-3 External speaker 65.00 

CK-70(EX299) 12V DC option 12.99 

MB 12 Mobile mount... 2599 




R9O0O lOOKHz 2GHz all-mode rcvr,., 5459.00 4699 



Due to the size of the ICOM product line, some 
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Parts Substitution 



A beginner's guide, 

by Bruce S, Hale KB 1MW/7 



As I look through the latest issue of 13, a 
construction article catches niy eye. 
Let's see if I have the pans. As usual. I have 
most, but not alL of them. And also as usual. 
Radio Shack doesn*t have everything that I 
need, I could mail-order the parts, but I can't 
get them all from one place, and I can't put 
together a minimum order for any one mail- 
order company. Oh, well. Another project 
for the "if lever find the pans" file. 

Sound familiar- Maybe it's one reason why 
"nobody builds anymore." In the old days, 
they'll tell you, everyone built with standard 
parts, and if you needed something, you 
could substitute one standard pan with anoth- 
er. Today, there are too many ^special-pur- 
pose' ' pans. But is that really true? 

There are a few special parts these days, 
mainly large-scale ICs. But there are also 
quite a few standard parts you can substitute 
for what looks like a special pan, if you know 
how. My experience in building has taught 
me a few tricks, and I'd like to share them 
with you. 

Can I Use This Resistor? 

With resistors, the power rating is your 
main concern, You're always safe using a 
resistor with a power rating greater than what 
the designer specified. If the designer used a 
'A -watt resistor and you've got a I -waiter, go 
ahead and use it. It will be a bit larger, but so 
what, if it saves you from waiting for mail 
order? 

Using a smaller resistor is generally a bad 
idea. You could try to calculate or measure 
the current and power dissipation, or try it 
and see if you "Met the smoke out of it," but 
you might be right on the edge of causing the 
part to fail Failure might occur only after 
you've used the device for a while, and it 
could take something expensive with it! 

If the design doesn't specify the resistor 
power rating, you can usually get away w r ith 
'/4-wau pans (especially in digital circuits, 
12 V receivers, and low-power transmitters). 
If you have '/a -watt parts, they're OK. too. 

Resistor tolerance is another important 
parameter. Resistors typically come in 10%, 
5%, and I % tolerances. The tolerance is the 
amount that the value of the component can 
vary from the value printed on the resistor. If 
the tolerance is critical for a project, the de- 
sign will usually specify it. If the design calls 
for 1 % resistors, don't use I09t pans! On the 
other hand, going towards better tolerance is 
OK. Using a I % resistor where a 5% value 
will do is a waste of money, but the device 
will work. 

40 73 Amateur Radio Today • June. 1991 



To rate parts for tolerance, manufacturers 
usually measure each part. It's impossible to 
manufacture parts that all stick to a close 
tolerance, but some of the pans in a given 
batch will be within I %, a few more will be 
within 5%, and most will be within 10%. So 
as the parts come out of the manufacturing 
process, they are measured and placed in bins 
according to tolerance. This means that the 
10% resistors will most often not be any 
closer than 5% of the given value. If they 
were within 5%, they'd be in the 5% bin! 
Some of the 10% parts will he on the high 
side, and some will be on the low side. Keep 
this in mind if you use 10^ parts. The best 
way to be sure of the value is to use a digital 
multimeter to measure each resistor. 

As for the actual value of the resistor, pay 
attention to the tolerance the designer speci- 
fied, and use it to your advantage. If the 
design specifics 2,2k at 10% . the expectation 
is that anything plus and minus 10% from 
2.2k will work. This means anything from 2k 
to 2,4k should be OK here. With larger value 
resistors, the percentage gives you an even 
wider margin for substitution. 

Remember the series/parallel formulas you 
had to learn for your exam? Here's a chance 
to put them to use. If you need a 2.2k resistor, 
but all you've got is a box of 4.7k resistors, 
use two of the 4.7k\s in parallel! That gives 
you the equivalent of a 2 .35k resistor. If you 
use your imagination, you can usually come 
up with some combination of the values you 
have on hand that will equal the value you 
need. If you keep a good stock of some ■ 'stan- 
dard*' values, like 470. Ik, 4,7, 10k, and so 
on, your substitution job will be that much 
easier. 

Did the designer specify a particular type 
of resistor (carbon-film, carbon composition, 
or metal film)? Usually, you can interchange 
types; if you have a carbon-composition re- 
sistor, and the design calls for carbon-film. 
you're probably OK (as long as your power 
and tolerance ratings are OK}. If the type of 
resistor is important, the designer should 
specify it: "Rl must be a carbon-film resis- 
tor.'* If this is specified, don't substitute. 

Pull-up Resistors 

A pull-up resistor is a special case for parts 
substitution. What*s a pull-up? It's usually 
one of the only resistors in a digital circuit, 
connected from one or more unused IC inputs 
to the power-supply (usually 5 volts). It 
"pulls up" the unused inputs and keeps them 
from "floating." 

This is one case in which you can substitute 



a wide variety of parts. The designer may use 
Ik or 10k resistors for pull-ups. You can 
generally substitute anything within this 
range. 

Smaller values will probably work, but 
they may increase the circuit's power 
consumption. Larger values may also work 
{especially in a low-power CMOS circuit), 
but they may also be unreliable. It's best 
to stay within the Ik to 1 0k range. As always, 
if you have the value the design specifies, 
use it! 

What About This Capacitor? 

With capacitors, the important parameter 
is the voltage rating. Again, it's always safe 
to use a capacitor rated at a higher voltage 
than the designer specified. A higher voltage 
rating just gives you a greater margin of 
safety. If the design specifies a 50V cap, and 
you have a 100V cap. use it On the other 
hand, you're asking for fireworks if you use a 
cap with a lower voltage rating than the de- 
sign calls for. 

If the designer doesn't specify the voltage 
rating, it's best to use caps rated at twice 
the power-supply voltage or more. For 
example, using 25V caps in a 12V circuit is 
fine, but using 50V caps in a 1 50V circuit is a 
bad idea. 

Here again, you can use the series/parallel 
formulas to combine capacitance to get the 
value you need. Understanding the way 
voltage and current divide through series and 
parallel capacitor combinations is a bit more 
difficult than with resistors; try to stick with 
capacitors that have at least the specified 
voltage rating, even if you use a series or 
parallel combination. 

Capacitor tolerance is also important. 
There are even more kinds of capacitors than 
there are resistors, and the tolerance can vary 
widely, depending on the capacitor type. In 
addition, capacitors are much more sensitive 
to temperature, and their value may shift 
widely as your circuit heats up. Disc-ceramic 
capacitors are usually the worst. They can 
vary as much as $0% from the printed value! 

There are some special purpose ceramic 
caps, however, such as the NP0 (negative- 
positive-zero or n-p-zero, but not n-p-oh). 
These caps should be used in VFO circuits 
where their temperature coefficient (capaci- 
tance drift as the temperature varies) is the 
important factor. Standard disc ceramic caps 
will drift all over the place, which makes 
them unsuitable for VFO use. NP0 caps hard- 
ly drift at all. If the design specifies NP0, 
don't use a standard cap. 













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What about "silver-mica' and "polysty- 
rene" capacitors? As far as drift goes, these 
are almost as good as NPO caps- If you can't 
find an NPO, try either of these two, Bui 
again, if the design calls for one of these three 
types, don't substitute ;i standard cap! If you 
have to use a silver-mica where a standard 
ceramic is called for, that's OK, but you* re 
^gilding the lily" and wasting money* 

Large- value capacitors (above about 2 ^iF) 
usually come in two types: tantalum and alu- 
minum electrolytic. Both types are polarized, 
and must be wired into a circuit in a particular 
way. Some people like to use tantalum caps 
because they're small. They do have advan- 
tages over aluminum clectrolytics — tantalum 
caps have lower leakage current and closer 
tolerances. Their actual value will be closer 
to the printed value, and the value will change 
less with temperature and time. 

This makes tantalum caps ideal for RC 
timing applications, where you want the cap 
to hold a charge for a long period, and you 
want the circuit to be easy to duplicate. Most 
of the time, it's not a good idea 10 substitute a 
regular aluminum electrolytic for a tantalum 
capacitor, This is one of those places uhere 
the designer should help you out and tell you 
if it's important to use a tantalum cap, If you 
really can't find the specified pan, go ahead 
and try the aluminum cap. 

Bypass Capacitors 

Bypass capacitors are like pull-up resistors 
when it comes to substitution. A bypass cap is 
usually connected from the power-supply pin 
of an IC to ground. The bypass cap gets rid of 
any AC spikes or noise on the power-supply 
voltage. You can use just about anything 
from 0.001 |JF to 0. 1 |JF for a bypass cap, 
and any type of capacitor is fine. Most de- 
signers use 0.00 1 , 0,01, or 0.1 |iF caps be- 
cause those values are easy to keep around. If 
you plan to build a lot of digital circuits, you 
should also try to keep a good stock of these 
values handy in your junk box. 

You may also see higher- value capacitors 
(between 10 and 100 |JF) connected from the 
power supply to ground near where the 
power connects to a digital circuit board. 
These are also bypass capacitors. While just 
about any value in this range will work, the 
designer may specify tantalum capacitors in 
a low-power circuit. Leakage cun-cnt is the 
important factor here. Even though capaci- 





Some Sta 


ndard Transistors 


Pan Number 


Type 


Typtcaf Use 


2N3904 


NPN 


oscillator, switch 


2N4123 


NPN 


oscillator, switch 


2N4124 


NPN 


oscillator, switch 


2N4401 


NPN 


oscillator, switch 


2N2222 


NPN 


oscillator, switch, low power amp 


2N3063 


NPN 


medium power amp 


2N3S53 


NPN 


medium power RF amp 


2N3866 


NPN 


medium power RF amp {to VHF} 


2N3906 


PNP 


oscillator, switch 


2N4C37 


PNP 


oscillator, switch 


2N4125 


PNP 


osciitator, switch 


2N412G 


PNP 


oscillator , switch 


2HAA03 


PNP 


oscillator, switch 


2N2907 


PNP 


medium power swiich 



tors block the flow of DC, there wilt usually 
be some small leakage through the capacitor, 
and this leakage can be much higher with 
aluminum electrolytic capacitors* It's still 
very small, however, and you can almost 
always forget about it, especially if you are 
using an AC power supply. If a tantalum cap 
is critical, the designer should tell you. 

Using Transistor Substitution Guides 

Transistor selection was a thorn in my side 
for quite a -while. It seemed like every time 

I wanted to build a project I had everything 
but one or two of the transistors. Tvc since 
learned that I could have built most of those 
projects with a few standard transistors. 

The table shows some of these "standard" 
transistors. With a link creative research. 
you can probably substitute one of the transis- 
tors in the table for the device in that circuit 
you're working on. 

Most transistor manufacturers land a few 
parts companies) publish transistor substitu- 
tion guides. You can use any one of these 
guides as a cross-reference to find a replace- 
ment from the table. The substitution guide 
will usually give you the manufacturer's stan- 
dard replacement for the part. Write that 
number down, then look up the replacements 
for the transistors in the table. If the manufac- 
turer recommends the same substitute for one 
of the standards, you're tn business. You 
don't need the special pan; one of the stan- 
dards will do. 

One other thing about transistors— you 
may see some deviation from the typical 
"2NXXXX* part numbers. For example, a 
PN2222 is simply a 2 N 2222 in a plastic case 
( M F** for "plastic"). Keep this in mind as 
you search for parts. 

Manufacturer's Part Numbers 

And then there are those cryptic IC desig- 
nation numbers, What's the difference be- 
tween a DM74 15 IAN and an SN74151A? 
Each comes from a different manufacturer, 
Will both of them work in the same circuit? 
You bet. Each has the same pan number: 
7415 1 A. The "baggage" in the designator is 
manufaeturerinformation. 

On the other hand, if a design calls for a 
74LSG0, and you have a 7400 IC, you might 
not gel away with substituting your IC in the 
circuit. Letters \n\he middle of an IC designa- 
tor tell you about the IC family. The "LS" in 
this part number means Mow- 
power Schottky." There are 
many more IC families, but 
that's a subject for another arti- 
cle. Just remember that letters 
at the beginning and end of an 
IC number aren't usually im- 
portant, but letters in the middle 
are. 

Catalogs* Books, and 
Magazines 

Pans supply catalogs are usu- 
ally full of information. You 

■a- 

can use a lot of this information 

to help you find substitutes for 
hard-to- find parts, Write or call 



parts companies and ask for their catalogs. 
Some of them charge a small fee, but the 
catalogs are usually worth it as reference ma- 
terial. 

Read all the construction articles you can 
find. Look at the schematics* You'll start to 
sec patterns after a while. Most engineers 
don't re-invent the wheel— if there's a good 
design out there, you'll see parts of it in other 
circuits. Keep a file of schematics: when you 
find something you want to build, check 
through your file for similar circuits, You 
may see the same basic circuit using a differ- 
ent transistor— maybe one that's easier to 
find! 

Join a Club 

Nothing beats being able to ask someone 
who has more experience than you. Try to 
find a club where some of the members build 
their own gear. If no one is building, encour- 
age them to. You may start something. Even 
if they 're not building, most hams can tell you 
stories about when they did build, and you 
can pick up a lot of useful information. 

Build and Experiment! 

Parts substitution is really not that difficult. 
The best way to find out what works is to 
build! Don't be afraid to experiment: if 
you're not sure about something, try it, and 
keep a record of your results. You'll learn a 
tot, and you'll have fun as you learn. That's 
what home-brew ham radio is all about. 



Three Bands with One Rock 

Continued from page I i 

was possible, but with about half the output 
power. 

Improvements 

The transmitter is a broad-band design. 
With appropriate output filters, you can 
transmit on 30 or 17 meter operation. The 
crystals must be fundamental mode* and no 
division from other bands results in the need- 
ed frequencies. Frequencies above 20 MHz 
arc usually third harmonic types that will 
probably either oscillate at their fundamental 
frequency or be very chirpy. 

Acknowledgments 

The design is a mixture of many QRP rigs 
that have come before. Certainly no one has 
written more on the subject than Doug De- 
Maw. His QRP Notebook, available from the 
ARRL (and * Uncle Waynes Bookshel r ). is 
an invaluable resource for QRP designs. 
QRP Classics, an excellent anthology of past 
QST articles, is another. It is also available 
from both sources, 

fd like to thank the many members of the 
Allen-Bradley Company Amateur Radio 
Club, who helped in the preparation of this 
project. 



Mike Gasperi WW9X t 4529 W. Johnson A ve. . 
Racine Wl 53405. 



42 73 Amateur Radio Today * June. 1991 



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Number 12 on your Feedback card 



Software for the Ham 

Shack , Part II 

Useful ham calculations you can program yourself! 

by Bill Clarke WA4BLC 



With luck, you have the first part of your 
ham computer system up and running 
(if not, see Pan 1 in the May 1991 issue). In 
fact, you may well have new wire antennas all 
over the yard that you have designed with 
your computer. Now it's time to add a little 
more to the system. This month the MAIN 
MENU will grow to five choices. These will 
be added to the first two in Pan I: 

3 -OHM'S LAW 

4 -POWER FORMULAS 

5 - EFFICIENCY FORMULA 

Module Three 

Make your selection from the OHM'S 
LAW menu, selection 3 of the MAIN 
MENU* and the computer will figure the 
unknown value for you. 

Module Four 

With the POWER FORMULAS menu, 
you can figure power output in watts. Just 

select the proper menu choice, and the com- 
puter will do all the math work for you. 

Module Five 

Just how efficient is your rig or amplifier? 

Merely enter the input and output powers, 
and the computer will tell you the percentage 
of operational efficiency. 

Entering the Listing 

Before you add program lines from this 
month's listing, you must first LOAD HAM I 
(again, see last month's issue; if you don't 
have it, you can call or write the 73 editorial 
office for one). After it's loaded, LIST it. 
Then you're ready to start typing. Don't wor- 
ry if some of the lines appear out of order. 
The computer will straighten out all the prob- 
lems during the SAVE , after you finish enter- 
ing the program lines. 

There are quite a few lines to enter this 
month, so take your time and be carefuL You 
might be well advised to enter pan of the 
listing, save it, and take a break. Come back 
later, reload, and add the remaining lines. 

After you have completed typing in all the 
lines, you must SAVE your work. Save it 
under the name HAM2, 

Don't forget to use the modifications for 
the C-64 which were listed in Pan I of this 
series. 

44 73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 





Listing for HAM2 




C-64 Users: Don't forget to make the modifications lis 


ted in 


Part I of this article series. 




16 PRINT SPACE$(26) ; "3 - OHM'S LAW" 




17 PRINT SPACE? (26) ? "4 - POWER FORMULAS" 




18 PRINT SPACE?(26) ; "5 - EFFICIENCY FORMULA" 




34 IF MS = "3" THEN 300 




35 IF H5 = "4" THEN 400 




36 IF MS = *5" THEM 500 




300 


CLEAR i CLS 




301 


PRINT SPACE? ( 30 ) ; "OHM'S LAW" 




302 


PRINT SPACE? (20) ? " - -" 




303 


PRINT : PRINT t PRINT 




310 


PRINT SPACES (26) r "1 - UNKNOWN CURRENT" 




311 


PRINT SPACE? (26) ;"2 - UNKNOWN VOLTAGE 1 ' 




312 


PRINT SPACES (26) r"3 - UNKNOWN RESISTANCE" 




315 


m = INKEY? 




316 


IF M? = "1" THEN 320 




3 17 


IF MS = "2" THEN 330 




318 


IF M$ = "J" THEN 340 




319 


GOTO 315 




320 


CLEAR : CLS 




321 


PRINT SPACES { 30 ); "OHM'S LAW" 




322 


PRINT SPACES (20) ; " ■ " 




323 


PRINT : PRINT : PRINT 




324 


INPUT "ENTER THE VOLTAGE IN VOLTS: M ?E 




325 


INPUT "ENTER THE RESISTANCE IN OHMS: M rR 




3 26 


I = E/R 




327 


GOSUB 390 




328 


PRINT : PRINT"TUE CURRENT IS; "FNAfD" AMPS" 




329 


GOTO 380 




330 


CLEAR : CLS 




331 


PRINT SPACES ( 30 ); "OHM'S LAW" 




332 


PRINT SPACES (20) ; " " 




333 


PRINT : PRINT z PRINT 




334 


INPUT "ENTER THE CURRENT IN AMPS: ";I 




335 


INPUT "ENTER THE RESISTANCE IN OHMS; ";R 




336 


E = I*R 




337 


GOSUfl 390 




3 38 


PRINT ; PRINT"THE VOLTAGE IS: "FNA(E)" VOLTS" 




339 


GOTO 380 




340 


CLEAR : CLS 




341 


PRINT SPACES ( 30 ) ? "OHM'S LAW" 




342 


PRINT SPACE? ( 20 ) ; "-- — — " 




343 


PRINT i PRINT : PRINT 




344 


INPUT "ENTER THE VOLTAGE IN VOLTS; " ; E 




345 


INPUT "ENTER THE CURRENT IN AMPS i " ? I 




346 


R - E/I 




347 


GOSUB 390 




348 


PRINT : PRINT"THE RESISTANCE IS: "FNA(R)" OHMS" 




349 


GOTO 380 




380 


PRINT 




381 


PRINT M N - TRY AGAIN" 




362 


PRINT "M * MAIN MENU" 




383 


MS = INKEYS 




384 


IF M? = "N" THEN 300 




385 


IF MS = "M" THEN 10 




386 


GOTO 3B3 




390 


DEF FNA(I) - INT ( 1*100+ . 5 ) / 100 




391 


DEF FNA(E) = INT ( E*100+ .5 ) /100 




392 


DEF FNA{R) = INT (R*100+ . 5 ) /100 




393 


DEF FNA(P) = INT ( PM00+. 5 ) /100 


(Continued) 



Using the New Program 

LOAD ihc new program by typing LOAD 
"HAM2* and pressing ENTER. When the 
computer signals READY on the screen, type 
RUN and press ENTER. 

The next thing you should see is the MAIN 
MENU for your new HAM SYSTEM. It 
should show five selections: ANTENNA 
DESIGN MATH. TRANSMISSION LINE 



MATH, OHMS LAW, POWER FORMU- 
LAS, and EFFICIENCY FORMULA. 

Next month, in Part HI of this four-part 
series, you Ml add modules six and seven: 
RADIO HORIZONS and OHMS TO RE- 
SISTOR COLORS to your ham shack soft- 
ware. 

You ma\ reach Bill Clarke WA4BLCatRD#2 
Box 455-A, AUamomNY 12009. 



394 

395 

399 

400 

401 

402 

403 

4ltJ 

4U 

4 12 

415 

416 

417 

418 

419 

4 20 

421 

422 

423 

424 

425 

426 

427 

4 28 

429 

430 

431 

432 

4_ 

434 

435 

436 

437 

43S 

43 9 

440 

441 

442 

443 

444 

445 

446 

447 

448 

449 

480 

481 

482 

483 

484 

485 

486 

500 

501 

502 

503 

524 

525 

526 

527 

528 

529 

58H 

581 

582 

5SJ 

584 

585 

586 



DEF FNA(D) = IUT (D* 100+ * 5 ) /100 

DEF FNA(M - INT (L*100+.5)/l00 

RETURN 

CLEAR : CLS 

PRINT SPACE? ( 28 ); "POWER FORMULAS' 1 

PRINT SPACE$f 20) ; *< - 

PRINT : PRINT : PRINT 
PRINT SPACE$(23) ;"1 - KNOWN 
PRINT SPACES (23); M 2 - KNOWN 
PRINT 5PACE$(23 ) t "3 - KNOWN 
M$ = INKE¥$ 

THEN 420 

THEN 430 

THEN 440 



VOLTAGE & 
VOLTAGE & 

CURRENT & 



CURRENT" 

RESISTANCE 

RESISTANCE 



<■ 



VOLTS : 
AMPS; 






"FNA(P)" WATTS 4 ' 



■ i 



VOLTS : 
IN OHMS: 



";R 



"FNA(P) " WATTS" 



IF M$ = n" 
IF M$ = "2 M 

if m = "3" 

GOTO 415 

CLEAR i CLS 

PRINT SPACES { 28 ) ; "POWER FORMULAS' 1 

PRINT SPACES (20) ?"— - — 

PRINT ; PRINT : PRINT 

INPUT "ENTER THE VOLTAGE IN 

INPUT "ENTER THE CURRENT IN 

P - E*I 

GOSUB 390 

PRINT : PRINT"THE POrfER IS: 

GOTO 480 

CLEAR : CLS 

PRINT SPACES ( 28 ) : "POWER FORMULAS 

PRINT SPACES ( 20 > r" — — 

PRINT : PRINT ; PRINT 

INPUT "ENTER THE VOLTAGE IN 

INPUT "ENTER THE RESISTANCE 

P = (E*E)/R 

GOSUB 390 

PRINT : PRINT 'THE POWER IS: 

GOTO 48 tf 

CLEAR : CLS 

PRINT SPACE? (23); "POWER FORMULAS" 

PRINT SPACE? (20) ; "- — 

PRINT : PRINT : PRINT 
INPUT "ENTER THE CURRENT IN 
INPUT "ENTER THE RESISTANCE 
P - ( I*I)*R 
GOSUB 390 

PRINT : PRINT"THE POWER IS: 
GOTO 480 
PRINT 

PRINT "N - TRV AGAIN" 
PRINT "M - MAIN MENU" 
MS = INKEY5 
IF MS = "N" THEN 400 
IF ^5 = "M" THEN 10 
GOTO 433 
CLEAR : CLS 
PRINT SPACES (26); "EFFICIENCY FORMULA" 

PRINT SPACES (20) ; " — — 

PRINT : PRINT ; PRINT 

INPUT "ENTER THE POWER OUTPUT IN WATTS: " ; O 
INPUT "ENTER THE POWER INPUT IN WATTS: "jl 
X = O/I : E = 100*X 
GOSUB 390 

PRINT : PRINT"THE EFFICIENCY IS: "FNA{E } "% " 
GOTO 580 
PRINT 

PRINT "N - TRY AGAIN" 
PRINT "M - MAIN MENU" 
M$ = INKEYS 
IF M$ = "N M THEN 500 
IF MS ■ 'M' 1 THEN 10 
GOTO 583 



H 



It 



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CIRCLE 194 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 45 



Number 1 3 on your Feedback card 



73 Review 



by Dick Goodman WA3USG 



SWISSLOG 

Version 3.66 

A complete QSO tracking system 
in one fast software program. 




Frank Greenhaigh KD2LL 

10 Robbins Ave. 

Amityvi!leNY11701 

TeK (516) 598-0011 

Price Class: $75 



CM ompuier logging programs have certain- 
ly proliferated in the last 10 years. Until I 
found Swisslog, I never really deemed them 
exciting enough to explore in detail Over the 
course of the last 20 years I have maintained 
my log in a variety of ways. During the pro- 
computer era of the early 1970s, I used the 
official ARRL logbooks. They worked out pret- 
ty well. They had all the necessary fields for 
mandatory information, such as call, date, 
time, signal report, etc. The back side of each 
page was blank, making it excellent for free- 
form remarks. The only problem was that after 
the log contained about 200-300 entries there 
was no efficient way to look up a particular 
QSO unless you knew the date, So I went to 3 " 
x 5 ff cards for a while (one for each QSO). 
What a painl 

Eventually I switched over to an MSDOS 
machine and tried a variety of commercial log- 
ging programs, but none quite suited my 
needs. I ended up using "DBASE 111 Plus" as 
a development system, and finally "Clipper" 
(a DBASE program code compiler) to write my 
own togging program. You can spend hours 
programming up your own system or make it 
easy on yourself and get a copy of SWISS- 
LOG. 

More Than Just Logging 

SWISSLOG is not just another logging pro- 
gram, ft is a complete amateur radio QSO 
tracking system with its own versatile reports 
generator/formatter, statistics generator, 
worldwide prefix/call library, beam heading 
routine, grid locator, awards tracking system, 
propagation prediction program (with graphic 
display of signal path), Grayline program, and 
other features too numerous to mention. 
SWISSLOG can be used as a full-featured 
logging program by the novice computer user, 
but its features really shine when the user has 
rudimentary computer skills. 

The documentation provided with SWISS- 
LOG is just about the best I have ever seen. 
Version 3.66 comes with a 102-page, profes- 

46 73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 



Ifrkm 



3 Sirl J*' 

I Jktw ua-riii* , 

ft OktHF H Iftflini 

t tin ikH !M'-fi-li#y froorw. 



[•irjiirtUl < k-ij t_H;-S 






*"** iim tetrtf hmitm 



Photo A, The SWISSLOG main menu. 




Photo B. Menu for Option 1, "add/update 
QSO records. 



** 




Photo C. Sequential list of ati "JA" contacts 
currently togged. 



sionalfy-bound reference manual, plus a 33- 
page addendum. it is clear, concise and in* 
eludes beautifully printed screen dumps and 
screen layouts. It is written to be a tutorial as 
well as a reference manual There are also 
tutorial files included with the SWISSLOG pro- 
gram itself. This documentation, along with 
"READ. ME" files, will enable new computer 
users to come online with this program very 
quickly. Users who have had generic query 
language programming experience (e.g. re- 
ports generator in DBASE III) will find this pro- 
gram almost intuitive. The ability to sort on any 
field and generate your own record selection 
criteria based on any combination of fields is 
quite impressive. 

SWISSLOG is also quite fast. Included on 
the distribution diskettes is a sampfe log which 
contains over 1,200 entries. It took a maxi- 
mum of about 15 seconds to sequentially 
search through this entire database and 
generate on-screen reports from my specified 
record selection criteria. It should also be 
noted that SWISSLOG uses index files to 
control the sorting of the database. Even when 
the total database becomes much larger than 
the current 1,200-pius entry size, the time to 
sort by callsign will not increase once the in- 
dex file has been built. This was a great lim- 
itation on older and less sophisticated logging 
systems. Another advantage is that an index 
file takes up much less space then a duplicate 
data file sorted in the desired sequence. Using 
index files also makes field seeks (e.g. find- 
ing QSOs by callsign) effectively instanta- 
neous. 

The reference manual clearly documents 
installation of SWISSLOG, The installation is 
totally automatic and takes about five min- 
utes. SWISSLOG requires 51 2K of memory, 
and it will run on monochrome or color sys- 
tems with DOS version 3.1 or higher, I would 
recommend a hard drive, but a system with 
two floppy drives will handle up to 2.000 
QSOs. This review was conducted on a 
Cornp-U-Add 286 running at 20 MHz with a 




Photo D. Progation prediction map, 

VGA display. The default color configuration 
for all SWISSLOG screens is, in my opinion, 
striking! The color scheme can also be 
changed by the user. Liberal use is made of 
pop-up windows. Virtually the entire program 
is menu driven, To enter the system, simply 
type "SWISSLOG 1 ' and press ENTER >. 

SWISSLOGs Offerings 

The first time SWJSSLOG is executed, the 
user will be prompted to enter a "personal 
profile." This consists of the latitude and lon- 
gitude of the QTH, the offset to UTC, display 
type (color/mono), and several other parame- 
ters unique to the user. This is all requested 
via a friendly menuing system and only has to 
be done upon initial program installation. Any 
of these values may be changed later if de- 
sired. The SWISSLOG mam menu will follow, 
as shown in Photo A. 

Please keep in mind that because of the 
sophistication of this program, this review will 
cover only the main points. The capabilities 
and versatility of this system are limited only 
by the imagination of the user. 

Option 1, "Add/Update QSO Records/' 

is almost self-explanatory. Upon selecting this 
option, the user is presented with a menu simi- 
lar to that shown in Photo B. From here you 
may enter new QSO data or, by using the 
appropriate function key as identified on the 
bottom of the screen, calf up existing logged 
entries to be viewed and edited. Index files are 
used so the search is instantaneous, regard- 
less of the database size. The order of data 
entry on thrs screen may be changed from 
Option 5 on the main menu to best suit the 
user's needs. For example, the calisign may 
be prompted for first, followed by the date and 
start time, then signal reports and other appli- 
cable fields. There is also a contest mode that 
checks for dupes on each band and notifies 
the user with inverse video and an audible 
signal. A sequence number can be kept up- 
dated for each QSO for contests that require 
it. Finally, the propagation prediction feature 
may be called up from here. This displays a 
world map with the propagation path dis- 
played, and estimated signal strength on each 
available band (See Photo D.). 

Option 2, "Select QSO-Records/' pre- 
sents a sub-menu. This allows the user to 
select QSO records via the SWISSLOG query 
language, sort records in any sequence, print, 
list to the screen or a file those selected 



records, and browse/update the selected 
records. Fields selected by the user may also 
be globally updated or deleted. Additional log 
files may also be created from this selected 
data, Reports generated may be formatted as 
desired. 

Option 3 T "Sort and Rebuild Index/ 1 
allows the regeneration of the SWISSLOG 
index file in calisign sequence. The "Sort" 
function will physically move the actual QSO 
records in any sequence of your choice. 

Option 4, "Merge Log-Files/ 1 allows the 
user to add the QSO records of one log file 
to the currently active log. This function en- 
ables several log files to be used in parallel, 
and is particularly useful in contests where a 
unique fite would be required for dupe check- 
ing, etc. 

Option 5, "Set Options and Profile/' al- 
lows the user to customize SWISSLOG. 
Names of files that are to be used, data rele- 
vant to your station (e.g, lat, long), definition of 
the most used options, input sequence of 
QSO fields, initial values of each QSO record, 
printer control sequences, display mask at- 
tributes, and QSO entry window size and 
placement may be specified. The color 
scheme of all SWISSLOG screens may also 
be modified from this option. 

Option S f "Change Filenames/" allows 
the selection of the active log from all available 
log files. 

Option Q, "QTH-Locator Conversion," 

will convert from latitude and longitude to grid 
square, or vice versa. It also provides beam 
headings and distance from your station. 

Option G t "Experimental Graphic-Sup- 
port, ,f allows tailoring of station and environ- 
mental parameters, such as antenna type and 
height {for each band) and sunspot number. 
This is used with the propagation prediction 
feature. 

Option S, '"Statistic-Support/' generates 
reports on the user's progress on getting 
DXCC, WAZ, ITU and WPX awards. These 
reports are beautifully formatted and would 
be of great assistance to the devoted con- 
tester. 

SWISSLOG has numerous other features 
not touched upon in this review. One impor- 
tant capability is the ability to import ASCII 
data into the database. This makes it possible 
to transfer data from other logging prog rams , 
or programs such as DBASE III, into SWISS- 
LOG, The table which contains country/prefix/ 
geographical coordinates may also be up- 
dated as prefixes or other related data 
changes. Finally, SWISSLOG may be made 
resident and popped up from within other pro- 
grams. The configuration options of this fea- 
ture are diverse and should satisfy most appli- 
cations where memory allocation could be a 
problem. 

It is impossible to describe the capabilities 
of SWISSLOG in the space allocated here. I 
can say with absolutely no reservations that 
this is the best logging program that I have 
ever seen, and I am now using SWISSLOG 
myself! 



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CmCU 68 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 47 




Number 1 4 on your Feedback card 



ARTER 'N' BUY 



Turn your old ham and computer gear into cash now. Sure, you can wait for a 
hamfest to try and dump it but you know you'll get a Far more realistic price if you have 
ki out whet* 100.000 active ham potential buyers can see ft than the few hundred local 
hams who come by a flea market table. Check your attic, garage, cellar and closet 
shelves and get cash for your ham and computer gear before it's too old to selL You 
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stuff isn't getting any younger! 

The 73 Flea Market, Barter "n* Buy. costs you peanuts (almost) — comes to 33c a 
word tor individual (noncommercial) ads and Si 00 a word for commercial ads Don't 
plan on telling a tang story. Use abbreviations, cram it in. But be honest. There are 
plenty of hams who Toveto fix things, so if it doesn't work, say so. 

Make your list, count the words, including your call, address and phone number. 
Include a check or your credit card number and expiration. If you're placing a 
commercial ad, include an additional phone number, separate from your ad. 

This is a monthly magazine, not a daily newspaper, so figure a couple months 
before the action starts; then be prepared. If you get too many calls, you priced it low. 
It you don't get many calls, too high. 

So get busy, Blow the dust off, check everything out, make sure it still works right 
and maybe you can help make a ham newcomer or retired old timer happy with that 
nq you're not using now. Or you might gel busy on your computer and put together a 
list of small gear/parts to send to those interested? 

Send your ads and payment to the Batter TTfiuy. Donna DiRusso, Forest Road, 
Hancock NH 03449 and get set for the phone calls 



BATTERY PACK REBUILDING: SEND 
YOUR PACK/48HR SERVICE ICOM; BP2/ 
BP3/BP22 $19.95, BP5mPB/BP23 $25,95, 
BP^4fBP70 526,95. BP7 $32.96. KENWOOD 
PB21 $15.95. PB2tHfPB6 522,95, PB25/26 
$24 95. PB2PBS $2995. YAESU FNB9 
S19.9S. FNB10/17 523 95. FNB11 S29-95, 
FNB3W4A $36 $5 STS: AV7G0O S27.95, 
ZENITH/TANDY LT PACKS S54 95 "U-0O4T 
INSERTS" ICOM: BP3/BP22 $16. 95, BPSrS/ 
24/70 S21 .95. KENWD; P921 $12.96. PB21H 
$18.95, PB24/25/2G $19.95, TEMPOrS 
$22 95, YAESU: FN89 $16.95, FNB1Q/17 
$18.95, FNB4/4A $32 95 AZDEN $1995 
"NEW PACKS': ICOM BP9B (BS CHG) 
$32.95. SANTEC: 142/1200 $22 95 b YAESU 
FNS2/500 $19 95. FNB2/fiOO $23 95, FNB 1 7 
$34.95, FREE CATALOG $3 00 Shipping/ 
order. PA + 6%, V1SAIWC i 52,00 CUNARD, 
RO.G BOX 104, Bedford, PA 15522. (814 J 
623-7000 BN325S 

CHASSIS. CABINET KITS SASE. KSfWIC. 
5120 Harmony Grove Rd. Dover PA 17315 

QUQ4U1 

AMATEUR RADIO CLASSIFIED Quality 
8 uy/Se Unmade publication, Twice monthly. 
inexpensive, easiest to read. Subscriptions: 
$12/yr. Ads: 25 cents/word. FREE SAM- 
PLES. POO 245-S, Jonesboro GA 30237. 

BNB2S3 

HOME-BREW PROJECTS lists lor S AS E 
Kenneth Hand. P.O. Box 70S, East Hampton 
NY 11 937, 6NB264 

TRANSISTORS RF FOR SALE: Looking tor 
repair shops, manufacturers and dealers 
MRF454 MRF455 series TOSHIBA 
2SC2290, 2SC2979, and nwe, Can (800) 
842-1489 BNB26S 

COMPLETE HF STATION FOR SALE Ken- 
wood TS-940 AT, SP-940, MC-6QA, HS-5 
phones, PC-1A. LF-30A, YK-SS-C, SW-2000, 
IF-1QB, IF-232C, Heit Boomsei. Alliance HD- 
73, Ameritron AL-80A, ATR-1S tuner, Hy- 
Gam Exp*oreM4 beam with 30/4OM option. 
PLUS all catting. OVER $6000 new, ONLY 
S3500. Don Bfedsoe WB6LYI. P.O. Box 
91299, Long Beach CA 90814 (213) 494- 
6765, BNB266 

HAM RADIO REPAIR CENTER, quality work- 
manship, Solid state or Tube, all makes and 
models Also repair HF amplifiers. A-Z Elec- 
trons Repair, 3638 East, Indian School Rd* 
Pneonia AZ 85018. (602) 956-3024 BNB267 

OSL CARDS— Look good with top quality 
printing Choose standard designs or fully 
customized cards. Better cards mean more 
returns to you Free brochure, samples 
Si amps appreciated Chester OSLs. Depl A, 
31 Commercial, Emporia KS 66801 . or FAX 
request to [3 1 6) 342-4 705 . SNB434 

SUPERFAST MORSE CODE SUPEHEASY, 
Subliminal cassetle $10 LEARM MORSE 
CODE IN 1 HOUR. Amazing new supereasy 



technique 5)0 Both 117 MoneyPack guar- 
antee. Free catalog: SASE Baftr. Dept 73-2, 
7320 Normandy, Cedar Rapids IA 52402, 

BNB531 

ROSS' SSSS USED June SPECIALS: KEN- 
WOOD TS-130S/CW.SSB.FL S599.9Q, IS- 
940SWAT $1695.40, TH415A S38990, TS- 

aaos $32990, icom 5510 $549 go, 

PS-15/CF-1 S144.90; YAESU FT-301D 
$379.90. FP-310 $109.90; TEN-TEC 562.2B8 
SI 699.90, 961 $179 90, 229B $249 90; MFJ 
989B $22990. 1030BX $48.90 ; MIDLAND 
13*770 $49.90. 13-7778 $4990. LOOKING 
FOR SOMETHING NOT USTED?? CALL OR 
SEND SASE, HAVE OVER 1B5 USED 
ITEMS in stock MENTION AD PRICES 
CASH, FOB PRESTON HOURS TUESDAY- 
FRIDAY 9:00 TO 6:00, 9:00-2:00 P.M. MON- 
DAYS CLOSED SATURDAY & SUNDAY. 
ROSS DISTRIBUTING COMPANY. 7fl 
SOUTH STATE. PRESTON ID 83263 (20S) 
852-0830 BNB654 

WRITTEN EXAMS SUPEREASY. Memory 
aids from psych oiog is (/engineer cut study- 
time 50%. Novice, Tech. Gen: S3 each. Ad- 
vanced Extra; $12 each Money back guaran- 
tee. Bahr, Qvpt 73-2, 7320 Normandy, Cedar 
Rapids \ A 52402 BNB691 

ROSS' S$$S NEW June (ONLY) SPECIALS: 
LOOKING FOR THAT HARD TO FIND 
ITEM?? KENWOOD TM-24TA S379 .90. m 
701 A $449.90, VFO-700S $149.90, TH-26A 
$259.90: ICOM IC-471-H $899 90, IC-04AT 
$269 99, EX- 106 $109.90; YAESU FT-47Q 
$399.90. FV-101DM S3 19 90. NYE VIKING 
MB-ll-00 S244 .90, M8-VA S619.90, ENCOM/ 
SANTECK ST220UP 1269,90, ST-142 
$24990; AEA PM-1 $129.90, PK 235MBX 
$309.90, PK-64AJHFM SH9.99; BIRD 4304 
$329.90, 43N $199 90; BUTTERNUT HF6V* 
X $144.90, HF-aV $142.90, STR-II $35.90. 
SEND S.A.S.E. FOR USED LIST. ALL L.T.O. 
(LIMITED TIME OFFER) LOOKING FOR 
SOMETHING NOT LISTED?? CALL OR 
WRITE Ower 9039 ham-related items in stock 
for immediate shipment Mention ad. Prices 
cash, F.O.B. PRESTON HOURS TUES- 
DAY-FRIDAY 9:00 TO 6:00, 9:00-3:00 P.M. 
MONDAYS. CLOSED SATURDAY & SUN- 
DAY. ROSS DISTRIBUTING COMPANY, 7fl 
SOUTH STATE, PRESTON ID £3263 (206) 
852-0630. BNB709 

HAM RADIO REPAIR all makes, models 
Experienced, reliable service. Robed Hal 
Electronics, Box 280363. San Fran- 
cisco CA 94128*0363, (408) 729-8200. 

BNB751 

WANTED: Ham equipment and other prop- 
erty. The Radio Club of Junior H*gh School 
22 NYC, bo, is a nonprofit organization, 
gran led 501<C)(3} status by the IRS, incorpo- 
rated with the goal of using the theme ol ham 
radio to further and enhance the educaiion of 
young people nationwide. Your property do- 
nallon or financial support would be greatly 



ippr eciated and acknowledged with a rece*p1 
for your tax deductible contribution, As 1991 
begins, please look over whatever unwanted 
equipment you may have, and call us We will 
pick up or arrange shipping. You will receive 
the tax deduction, hul most import am. ihe 
privilege ol knowing that your gift really made 
a difference m the education and upbringing 
of a child Meet us on the W62JKJ CLASS- 
ROOM NET, 1200 UTC on 7,238 MHz, and 
hope to see you at the KNOXViLLE HAM- 
FEST June 1 . Write ua at: The RC of JHS 22 
NYC, Inc.. P.O. Sox 1052, New York NY 
10002, Round the dock HOTLINES: Voice 
016) 674-4072, FAX (516) 674-9600 

BN3762 

"HAMLOG" COMPUTER PROGRAM Full 
features. 19 modules Ayic-logs. 7-band 
WAS/DXCC. Apple, IBM, CFVM. KAYPRO. 
TANDY, CAB $24,95 73-KA1 AWH PB 2015, 
Peebody MA 1 960. BN B775 

LAMBDA AMATEUR RAOtO CLUB Interna- 
iionai amateur radio dub for gay and lesbian 
hams. On-air sheds, monihh/ newsletter, and 
annual gathering ai Dayton (215) 978- 
LARC, P,0, Box 24810. Philadelphia PA 
19130 BNBai2 

INEXPENSIVE HAM RADIO EQUIPMENT, 
Send postage stamp for list. Jim Brady— 
WA4DS0, 3037 Audrey Dr., Gastonia NC 
28054 BNB890 

WANTEDt BUY S SELL All types of Electron 
Tubes. Call toil free 1 (800) 421-9397 or 1 
(612) 429-9397. C&N Electronics. Harold 
Bramsfedt, 6104 Egg Lake Road. Hugo MN 
55038. BNB900 

ELECTRON TUBES: Alf types & sizes. Tntm- 
mining. receiving, microwave Large in* 
ventory = same day shipping Ask about our 
3-500Z special. Daily Electronics. P.O. Box 
5029, Compton CA 90224. (BOO) 346^ 
6667. BNB913 

COMMODORE 64 HAM PROGRAMS-fl 
dish sides over 200 Ham programs Si6 95 
2$c stamp gets unusual software catalog of 
Utilities, Games, Adult and British Disks 
Home-Spun Software, Box 1064-BB. Estero 
FL 33928. BNB917 

FOR SALE RTTY. AMTOR. CW, packet aya- 
tarn, including AEA PK-232MBX conlrollef in 
mint condition. Two RCA APT smart termt 
nab. Reutres 9" monitor, etc. $350 CalJ Ron 
Brandenbu r§ M2ARQ , {7 1 8) 996-0700 before 
3:00 weekdays BNB940 

WAKTED: For museum and author— pre- 
1950 microcomputers and publications— al- 
so need CPM computers, Osborne, Kaypro. 
etc Need author to write detailed book on 
how to use the PACKAATT software. Dave 
Larsen KK4WW, Blacks burg Group, P.O. 
Box 1, Blacksburg VA 24063^W01, (703) 
7G3r43t 1/231-6478, BNB945 

JUST IMAGINE your own beautiful Blue 
Ridge mountain top OTH— salting my 323- 
acfe Christmas tree farm— alt or pari — trees 
optional KK4WW, Floyd VA. f703) 763-331 1 , 

BNB956 

CUSHCftAFT, Barker & Williamson, power 
supplies, rotors, batuns, center insulators, 
ladder line, coax, connectors, surplus 
tubas. ATKfNSON A SMITH, 17 Lewis St., 
Eatontown NJ 07724 1(800)542-2447 

BNB057 

AMIGA. MACINTOSH. ATARI XUXE/ST 
Amateur radio and electronics PD software, 
$4.00 per disk. Send 2 stamps SASE for cata- 
log. Specify which computert WA4EFH. 
Box 1 646. Orange Park FL 32067 1 646. 

BNB958 

FREE Ham Gospel Tracts. SASE, N3FTT, 
5133 Gramercy. Clifton Hts. PA 1 iOt 8 

DNP ftCO 

BUILD 35-FOOT FREE STANDING TILT 
OVER TOWER. Plan book. $3,96 plus 51 00 
S&H Build metal lathe, metal snaper. milling 
machine, drill press, brake, engines, etc, 
Large SASE for book iist Gingery Tool, 
P.O Box 75. Fofdtand MO 6S652-0075. 

BNBQB 

PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS for projects m 
73, Ham Radio, Q$T t ARRL Hano'DOO#: List 
SASE. FAR Circuits, 1SN640 FiekJ Ct M Dun- 
dee 1L601 18. BNB966 



SATELUTE MONTHLY AUDIO CODES 1 
(900) MOT-SHOT. Intended for testing ortfy. 
S3 50 per call 0NB976 

BLIND, DISABLED would like friends who 
will donate a new or used shortwave radio. I 
f ike to listen to the world I'm a shut-in Please 
write Richard J as trow. £909 West 6th SL, 
Hollywood CA 90036, Of phone (213} 93ft- 
5341 BNB978 

AZDEN SERVICE by former factory techni- 
cian. NiCds £36.95 plus shipping. Southern 
Technologies Amateur Radio. Inc.. 10715 
SW 190 St. #9. Miami FL 331S7. (30$} 238- 
3327, BNB979 

DIGITAL AUTOMATIC DISPLAYS Ken^ 
wood, Yaesu. Collins, Drake. Alias, etc. No 
bandswitching required. Business 52c 
SASE. Be specific, GRAND SYSTEMS, 
Dept A, P,0. 6ok3377, Blaine WA 90230, 

BNB961 

COMMODORE 64 REPAIR Fast turn around. 
Southern Technologies Amateur Radio, 
10715 SW 190th Street #9. Miami FL 33157, 
(305) 238-3327 BNB982 

TRAVEL1 HIGH INCOME! Radio officers 
needed for shipboard employment, Must 
have FCC Second Class Radiotelegraph li- 
cense and background m electronics. Salary 
approximately 54,000 montttry to start, in- 
cluding vacation plus full benefits. Rae 
Echols, W7FFF, American Radio Associa- 
tion, 5700 Hammonds Ferry Road. Linthicum 
Heights MD 21090. BNB963 

IT'S BACK AND BIGGER THAN EVER: THE 
HW-B HANDBOOK. Modifications for the 
Heath HW series ol ORP ngs A must for 
every QRPer $7.95 plus $1 00 for first class 
postage, or OX $1 4.95 air. to Michael Bryce 
WB8VGE. 2225 Mayflower NW, Massillon 
OH 44G47. BNB984 

REPOSSESSED VA & HUD HOWES avail 
ao*e from government from $1 without credit 
check You repair Also S&L bailout proper- 
ties. CeJI 1-805-682-7555 ext. 1+4470 for 
repo (til your area. BNB9S5 

SEIZED CARS, trucks, boats, 4wheeiers, 
motor homes, by FBI. IRS, DEA Available 
your area now. Call 1 -805-682-7555 ext. O 

BNB986 



WAITED: RF MAGNETOMETER (oaussme- 
ter); computer for packer use, KB4QGJ, G. 
Rose, 524 N. Quaker Lane, Alexandria VA 
£2304. (703) 370-1880, BNB991 

HIGH EFFICIENCY BALUNS Legal limit on 
HF bands, Excellent for dipotes. 1:1 ratio. 
$39 00 post paid U.S., or for more info- 
WB5L. P.O. Box 157, Pftugervllle TX 
78660 BNB992 

LIKE CONTESTS? Write for details on Ameri- 
ca's mqsl rewarding contest. TSRAC, Box 
240. RO 1 . Adena OH 43901 , BNB993 

VIOEOCIPHER ll/Scanner/Cafile/Satetlfte 
modification and repair books. Catalog, 
*3.00.TELECODE 1 PO Box 642f>PE Ytmia 
A2 85366-6426 BNB994 

SOFTWARE: IBM, COMMODORE a AP- 
PLE. HUtech available only here! $2.00 each. 
$1.00 lor catalog. OFFShore Software. P.O 
Box 160242, Mobile AL 36618. BNB995 

Dt POLES CUSTOM HADE for your frequen- 
cy Catalog $2,00. Beacon Hill Antenna 
Works, 201 Coach House Drive, Madison Wl 
53714. 8NB996 

MORSE CODE COMPUTER INTERFACES 
$49.95 License study programs. $14.95. PX 
audio processor for CW, packet. AMTOR. 
RTTY r 549 95 Free Public Domain and ham 
catalog for IBM or C0C0 Dynamo Electron- 
ics, Box 996, Hartsette AL 35640 (205) 773- 
2758. BNB997 

NOW YOU CAN OWN THE ULTIMATE JRC- 
JST 136 or JST ia5 HP HF transcervei. Also 
Hi* general coverage HF receiver JRC-NRD 
525 or N RO 535 Our special prices: JST- 1 35. 
51 7d900; JST035 HP $294900: NRD-62& 
$1049.00; and NHD-535 TBA. Call Henry. 
N4EDQ, AMATEUR RADIO SALES. 1 (800) 
G26-6433 Also let us be your accessories 
and complete radio store. BNB998 



48 73 Amateur Radio Today ■ June, 1991 




HamBase 

Data Retrieval Software 



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Number 15 on your Feedback card 



Get on the 
WARC Bandwagon 

You can still enjoy good DXing, even as propagation conditions decline. 



by Drayton Cooper N4LBJ 



Even though Sunspot Cycle 22 has show n 
some marked idii>svncracic> laielv. the 
consensus 01 opinion is thai the number of 
spots will stain be showing a marked decrease 
once agaiti To any avid user of our higher 
frequency hands (20 meters and above), 
that means declining conditions on loniz-haul 
paths, and increasing frustration over the 
scarcity of good openings to faraway places. 
Looking ahead two or three years to the 
bottoming out of Cycle 22 . there is a ray 
of hope for those o\' us w ho enjoy DXing: The 
WARC bands are now all in place, and one 
of them in particular should ease the need for 
aDXfix. 

i 

The WARC Bands 

The WARC bands are the "new' bands, 
assigned to amateur radio as a result of the 
last World Administrative Radio Confer- 
ence, in 1979. These relatively small slices of 
spectrum space were handed to us over a 
period of 10 years, with the last one, 17 
meters, opened for U.S. operators less than 
two years ago. 

For the first time in our history, we will 
be facing the bottom of a sunspot cycle 
with more choices of frequencies than we 
have ever enjoyed before. If you have not 
tried the WARC hands (and there is a surpris- 
ingly large number of hams who haven't), 
this article will introduce you to them. And, 
along the way, even hams familiar with these 
frequencies will find a few tips for better 
using them. 

30 Meters 

The granddaddv of the WARC bands is 30 
meters. It's an all-digital band, meaning that 
you dyed-in-the-wool CW fans have u home 
now, just as you did years ago when 40 me- 
ters was Kijig of the Air. 

The 30 meter band runs from 10. KK) MHz 
to 10.150 -MHz. and 10 that 50 kHz vou'll 
hear not him; but CW. AMTGR. RTTY and 
HF packet since, with few exceptions, voice 
modes are not allowed in this band. 

Clustered near the lower end of 30 are the 
CW operators. If you're not the holder of a 35 
wpm code proficiency certificate, don't feel 
that there's no place for you on 30, The vast 
majority of fists you'll hear on the lower end 
of 30 are sending at a comfortable rate of 

50 73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 



10 too 

t 



CW/Difjllnt 



30 Holers 



10 150 MKi 

I 



1U U6B 18,110 18.160 Hill 

j I! W/l>- .; I l -a I { Vi.;-f ; 



17 Mi-li-r \ 



2t S90 24 930 24 990 MHt 

| C W/Dtjttal | Voice i 

12 Meiers 



Figure. Frequency chart of the WARC bands. 

15-20 words per minute. 

The propagation on 30 is not necessarily 
what you would expect it to be. Many hams 
felt it would combine the best of 20 and 40, 
and to a degree it does. 

One of the charms of 30 meter operation is 
mat it can exhibit some very unexpected sur- 
prises. For instance, you may be rag-chewing 
with a friend in the 350-mile range, sign with 
him, and suddenly hear a station calling you 
from another continent! 

DX possibilities are generally quite good 
on 30. One reason for this is that all hams are 
on fairly level ground on this band as far as 
power is concerned. Most countries have set 
limitations on power output on 30m (250 
watts is generally the maximum), and anten- 
nas on this band continue to be primarily 
fairly simple ones. 

12 Meters 

The next WARC band to be opened to 
LLS. hams was 12 meters* Nestled about 
halfway between the very popular 15 meters 
and the quixotic 10 meters, 12 meters runs 
from 24.890 to 24.990 MHz. The mode plan 
on 12 divides the band at 24,930 MHz.: Below 
that point, communication is limited to the 
digital emissions; above it, SSB reigns 
supreme. 

If you're a DXer trying this band for the 
first time, look for stations around 24.935 on 
SSB. In the early days of 12 meters, many 
DXers settled in a few kHz up from the lower 
SSB band edge and, out of habit, ihey contin- 
ued to center in this area. 

On CW, however, it seems that there is no 
fixed DX window. Both stateside and foreign 
stations are found throughout the lower por- 



tion of the band. 

Propagation on 12 meters seems to be 
much more like 10 meters than 15. This 
means that the band is often apparently dead, 
with few, if any, signals coming through. 
However, there might be plenty of iono- 
spheric support for communications if some- 
one would put out a CQ. 

The 12 meter band does seem to be under- 
occupied. There was an initial rush of stations 
trying it out, but now the number of operators 
using it seems to have leveled off consider- 
ably, so there is practically no QRM. 

Because of its proximity to 10 meters in the 
radio spectrum, conditions on 12 are often a 
"delayed" mirror of 10. For instance, from 
the East Coast, operators on 10 meters look 
west late in the afternoon for contacts with 
Oceania. 

Sometimes, just as a rare Pacific island 
becomes readable in the east on 10. the band 
folds, and the station is lost. Dropping down 
to 12 meters at this time, the East Coast ham 
would still be able to hear signals from the 
same general area that he had on 10. Howev- 
er, because 1 2 meters is principally a daytime 
band like 10, he might get only another 30-60 
minutes of use before it, loo, closed down. 

17 Meters 

The "sleeper' in the WARC bands ap- 
pears to be 17 meters, More and more, this 
band seems to be catching on with hams 
around the world. Band occupancy on 17 is 
now quite good, and QRM is becoming an 
everyday occurrence. 

This band runs between 18,068 MHz and 
1 8. 168 MHz. with the di v iding point between 
CW and SSB (in the United States, at least) at 
18.1 10 MHz. Above that point, SSB is per- 
mitted; below it, the digital modes are exclu- 
sive. 

There is no reduced power limitation on 1 7 
(nor on 12, for that matter), and if you want to 
run the legal limit, you may. However, few 
stations on 17 run much more than 100-200 
watts. In all likelihood, though, this is not 
because of anv altruistic motivation! Until 
quite recently, most commercially available 
linear amplifiers either would not resonate on 
17 meters, or would do so only very ineffi- 
ciently. As the manufacturers redesign their 
gear to load up on 17, you can expect more 



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52 7$ Amateur Radio Today • May, 1991 



and more high power stations to appear there. 

If you listen on I 7, you are in for some real 
propagational surprises. One day the band 
may be filled with signals from both the Unit- 
ed States and Europe; a few hours later, sig- 
nals from half a world away may be the only 
ones you hear! 

Just recently, the USSR Antarctic station, 
4K1B, was heard here on the East Coast at 
579-599 levels, while only a few kHz away 
the USSR Arctic counterpart, 4K201L, on 
Franz Josef Land, was coming through at 
equally good signal strengths. These stations 
were almost 12,000 miles apart, yet both 
were being worked by hams across the Unit- 
ed States* 

Another eye-opener on 1 7 is the strength of 
long-path signals. Stations in Australia and 
New Zealand generally come through on the 
short -path (i.e., direct path) into the United 
States during the early morning hours on 17 
meters. 

Later in the day, however, you can often 
work these same VK/ZL stations with even 
better results by using the long-path. The 
same phenomenon appears on 20 meters, at 
generally the same hours, but the long-path 
signals on 17 usually seem stronger than they 
do on 20. 

DXing 

Thus far, the IARU (International Amateur 
Radio Union) has banned contest operations 
on all three of the WARC bands. For those 
hams who do not care to engage in the RF 
mayhem of contesting, the WARC bands of- 
fer a respite on those winter weekends when it 
appears that the rest of the world's population 
is sending nothing but **CQ Test/ 

Little by little, however. DXpeditions are 
discovering the new bands, particularly 17 
meters. This is a knife that cuts both ways. 
The presence of some of the more recent 
DXpeditions on 1 7 has allowed many hams to 
have a taste of working a really rare one, In 
some cases, the appearance of the expeditions 
on the WARC bands gave many an opportu- 
nity to work the DX they would not have had 
on the other bands because the pile-ups were 
smaller, and were far more disciplined. 

This brings up another point about the 
WARC bands. Much of the raucous and dis- 
courteous operating habits found in such 
abundance on the established bands is gener- 
ally nonexistent on the WARC frequencies, 
even in the midst of DX openings. Why this is 
the case would be a good topic for a sociolo- 
gist or psychologist to explore. But so far. the 
vitriol and hostility which have marred our 
reputation around the world is simply absent 
on the WARC hands. 

Antennas 

For many (probably most) hams, the anten- 
nas of choice for the WARC bands seem to be 
the ones they already ha\e! However, some 
time spent on putting up a good antenna for 
30, 17 and 12 will pay off in huge dividends. 

In preparation for writing this article. I 
recently spent several hours on 17 meters, 
listing the various antennas t heard in use. Far 
and away, the most-used antenna appeared to 



be either a 75 meter or 40 meter center-fed 
Zepp, Not far behind came the G5RV varia- 
tion on the same theme, followed by loops of 
various configurations. Only a very few sta- 
tions seemed to be using resonant, multi- 
element, rota table antennas. The ones who 
were using them, though* "owned' iheir 
frequencies! 

I expect my experiences with antennas for 
the WARC bands are typical. When I first 
used these bands, 1 loaded my "all-band 
Zepp" on 30 meters with a T-match tuner. 
The results were good, and I was satisfied. 
Then 1 heard a W8 who was using the same 
rig I was, but was feeding it into a 2 -element 
rotary. He and 1 often worked the same DX 
stations back-to-back, but he usually got a 
589 or 599 from the DX station, compared to 
my 569* Lesson learned! 

A compromise antenna will work well on 
the WARC bands, but a dedicated, resonant 
antenna will work far better. There arc sever- 
al dual-band yagis now available commer- 
cially for 17 and 12. 1 can highly recommend 
the 2-element 12/17 beam available in kit 
form from Gary Nichols KD9SV, owner of 
SV Products, 4100 Fahlsing Rd>* W T oodburn 
IN 46797; but there are others available on 
the market that are probably just as good. 
Cushcraft now produces 3-element trapped 
12/17 beams and monobanders for the 
WARC bands. Also, a number of manufac- 
turers offer WARC add-on kits for their ex- 
isting antennas. 

Rolling your own for the WARC bands, 
especially for 17 or 12, would be a worth- 
while project, too. Boom lengths are certain- 
ly reasonable (mine is only 8') and aluminum 
tubing for the elements can be found in most 
hardware stores. And, there is certainly no 
reason not to use "thin wall" conduit (EMT 
tubing), which was the staple item for years 
for nearly ail home-brewed beams of earlier 
times. 

There have been several articles published 
in the amateur literature on yagi designs for 
12 and 17 meters. One of the best of these 
appeared in the July 89 issue of Radio Com- 
munication (the journal of the Radio Society 
of Great Britain). This design uses three ele- 
ments on a fairly short boom, with a split 
driven element* The advantage to this type of 
construction is that the driven element can be 
fed directly with the coax, so you won't need 
to build a gamma matching device. 

I hope thai this primer on WARC bands has 
piqued your curiosity, and that you Ml be in- 
terested enough to give the new bands a try. 
As Tve pointed out, each of them has its own 
appeal , especially as we look at deteriorating 
propagation on the established bands, and the 
increasing QRM as more and more stations 
M move down" because of the decline in 
sunspot activity. A good antenna for the 
WARC bands is in reach of every ham, and 
with one, you'll find a new world of ope rat- 
ing pleasure awaiting you. 

Why not hop on the WARC bandwagon 
now? 



Contact Drayton Cooper N4LBJ at P. O. Box 
5, Bowling Green SC 29703. 



Homing in 



Number 1 6 on your Feedback card 



Joe Moett PEKWDV 
PO Box 2508 
Futlerton CA 92633 

Hunting for the Gold 

'This Time it's Our Turn r ThaTs the 
headline of the bulletin I received, de- 
scribing what will probably be the first 
international amateur radio direction 
finding (DF) competition on US soil. It 
may also be a prelude to T-hunting be- 
coming an event at the Olympics! 

The bulletin was from the Friendship 
Amateur Radio Society (FARS) It 
came with a lengthy Setter from John 
While K7RUN. I hurried to the phone 
and was soon speaking with him The 
good news was that the upcoming con- 
test was "for real" The bad news: 
There was little time to round up our 
best "world -class" DFers. 

Sister Cities Starts It 

Portland, Oregon, is a sister city to 
Khabarovsk, in Asian USSR. Khaba- 
rovsk has 650,000 residents and is 
480 miles northwest of Sapporo, 
Japan, In the spring of 1989, the Port- 
land Amateur Radio Club (PARC) was 
■nvited to send a team to the first Sister 
Cities Friendship Raoiosport Games 
(SCFRG-S9) in Khabarovsk to begin 
September 25 of that year The Soviets 
would have two teams competing. 
There would also be a team from Ni- 
igata, Japan, another sister city to 
Khabarovsk. 

PARC was up to the challenge, and 
sent five locals to the Games. They 
were: Richard Fredrickson WA0DIM 
(Photo A), Dave Wright N7MYO, Kevin 
Hum WA7VTD T John While K7RUN, 
and Rene Berblinger KX7Z. 

In addition to the foxhunt, the Games 
included high speed CW and HF 
"round robin" DX events. 

In the USA we think of a T-hunt as 
an ouling in the family car, van, or ^eep, 
with perhaps a hundred feet of "sniff- 
ing" at the end. 

Elsewhere in the world, however, the 
fox is a completely different "animaf," 
In Europe and the Far East, foxhunting 
is an athletic event. Successful com- 
petitors are skilled at DFing and 
wilderness orienteering, plus they can 
withstand the rigors Of a course that 
may take them several miles. 

The PARC participants knew little of 
what lay ahead. They knew nothing 
about the DF gear they would be using 
to find the fox. because it was to be 
supplied to all the teams by the Soviet 
hosts. Talk about a home-court advan- 
tage! 

Foxhunting. Soviet Style 

There are no "appliance operators" 
in the USSR, because no commercial 
ham gear is made there Russian hams 
"roll their own" or convert surplus mill* 
tary rigs. Evgeny Stavicky UWGCA, 
Chairman of the Khabarovsk Territorial 



Radio Direction Finding 

Radiosport Federation (Photo B), buiJt 
his own state-of-the-art HF transceiver, 
complete with LED readout, from sal- 
vaged parts. The Soviets cannot buy 
ham and DF gear from the US and 
Japan because the ruble is not an inter- 
national currency, 

K7RUN described his introduction to 
Soviet- style foxhunting: The DF re- 
ceivers were the only piece of manu- 
factured ham equipment t saw in the 
whole stay there They were quasi -mili- 
tary devices, with no S-meter You had 
to listen in the earphones and judge the 
signal strength. 

"The foxhunt was held on two me- 
ters. They have very little activity on 
that band in general there— no re- 
peaters- Antennas were all four*ele- 
ment yagis, with a bit of a strange pat- 
tern. They were built to be collapsible. 
The elements were curved steel like a 
tape measure, which he Ed shape whan 
extended but could be folded up< 

'The target transmitters put out 
MC W. The receiver was not a superhet 
design, tt was the TRF type, solid- 
state, broad; and very difficult to tune. 
There was no BFO, but it had a 
quencher circuit that interrupted the 
received signal at an audio rale to cre- 
ate a tone. 

"The five OF units for our team were 
not very uniform. The antennas tended 
to have two nulls on the back, one 
much deeper than the other." 

As Murphy would have it, the day of 
the DF competition was the only day of 
rainy weather during the team's stay in 
Khabarovsk. "We all had the look of 
drowned rats/' says K7RUN. By world 
radiosport standards, the event was 
held on an abbreviated course, with 
only three transmitters. 

The total course was about a mile 
The Soviet teams placed first and 
second, as expected. The PARC 
team came in third, followed closely 
by the team from Japan. Shortest indi- 
vidual time for the course was just un- 
der five minutes. Longest time was 44 
minutes. 

After the Gaines ended, there were 
visits to the homes of Soviet hams, a 
group boat ride on the Amur River, pic* 
nicking, and hours of happy ham and 
non-ham talk. Just as in the USA, hams 
in the USSR are & cross section of the 
country, UWGCA is a professor of mu- 
sic and a piano teacher in a girls' 
school by day. He runs a dub ham 
station for his school. 

The US hams were given Soviet ham 
tickets upon arrival. Some of the Rus- 
sians wanted to gel operating privt* 
leges for future vistts to the USA. There 
were enough VEs in the US delegation 
to hold an exam session in Khaba- 
rovsk, but the exams had to be given 
in English. Nevertheless, Mikhail 
Zavarukhin UW0CN passed all the ele- 
ments for his US Extra class license 
and is now AA7CH. 




Photo A Cameras flash as Dick Frednckson WAQDfM f eaves the foxhunt starting 
ramp at the first Sister Cities Friendship Radiosport Games in 1989, 




Photo B. Piano teacher Evgeny Stavicky UW0CA sprints to the fintsh tine after 
completing the foxhunt course in Khabarovsk. USSR> 



Let's Have a Rematch 

Soon it was time to go home. But the 
hams of Portland were not about to let it 
end there. They soon established 
FARS, a nonprofit corporation , in 
November 1989. A few months later, 
UW(JCA and UW0CN visited Portland 
to help promote FARS t plan further 
events, and demonstrate radiosports 
(non-DF) in the Goodwill Games. 
Evgeny passed his Technician exam 
during his time m the USA 

That brings us to the present, and 
the Friendship Radio Games of 1991 
(FRG-91). Under the leadership of 
WACOIM, FARS is putting on a three- 
ring circus of ham radio competition 
beginning May 30: foxhunting, CW 
sending/receiving, and HF contesting. 

The FRG-91 DF contest is being held 
in Forest Park, said to be the largest 
park in any city in the world. In keeping 
with world-class European competition 
rules, five hidden transmitters will be 
scattered around the park Each con- 
testant's score will be his or her lime to 
find the five rigs, in order, and return to 
the starting point. 

Transmitters will have CW identifi- 
ers, and be activated in sequence for 
one minute each. In addition, there will 
be a continuous homing transmitter on 
a separate frequency to guide the con- 
testants back to the start/finish line. 
The complete course will be 3,75 mites 
or less. 

FARS is providing DF equipment to 



entrants selected for the team competi- 
tion. A limited number of individuals 
will be allowed to compete indepen- 
dently, but they must provide their own 
gear. Maps of the course will be provid- 
ed in advance. 

As you might expect, the Portland 
area wilt provide most of the US fox- 
hunters for FRG-91 , but the organizers 
want other areas of the country to be 
represented, too. 

As of this writing, it looks like Albu- 
querque, New Mexico, and the Los An- 
geles area will be represented, at least. 

The Soviets and Japanese will be 
present again, of course A dozen 
hams from Khabarovsk will be there, 
along with Gene Shuigin UZ3AU T tech- 
nical editor of Radio, a Soviet ham 
magazine. In addition, a team from 
Vancouver, Canada, may compete. 

Foxhunting at the Olympics? 

FARS has even bigger ideas for the 
future. K7RUN says, "We are pushing, 
as is Eastern Europe and the USSR, to 
make foxhunting an Olympic sport, at 
least as a demonstration. A set of 
games is being planned for Leningrad 
in several months thai will be used as a 
springboard for this." 

Hats off to the hams of Portland for 
bringing wo rid -class woodland fox- 
hunting to the USA! Watch future 
"Homing ln Nt columns for the results of 
FRG-91, For more information about 
FARS and FRG-91 , write to PO Box 
13344. Portland OR 9721 3. 



73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 53 



Hams a ts 



Number 17 on your Feedback card 



Andy Mac Af lister WA5ZI8 
14714 Knightsway Drive 
Houston TX 77083 



Station Enhancement 

Only 15 years ago most of the anten- 
nas and accessories in an amateur 
satellite station were home-Drew or 
made from Kits. Today the reverse is 
true. AH the necessary gear can be pur- 
chased, but many amateurs prefer to 
build ttieir own preamp and antenna* 
polarization control box. 

Soma satellite antennas come with 
polarization -control units, or can be 
purchased as an option. A few mast- 
mounted preamps come with control 
boxes, but most do not, In many cases, 
stations will have at least four individu- 
al control units for the antenna-mount- 
ed 2 meter and 70 cm preamps and the 
polarization relays on (he antennas. 

Newcomers may ask why mast- 
mounted preamps and polarization- 
control devices are necessary. Some- 
limes they are not, but amateurs who 
have worked with the satellites for a 
few years know the advantages of hav- 
ing them. Such systems are especially 
useful for the high -orb it satellites, like 
AMSAT-OSCAFMO and AM3AT- 
OSCAR- 13, where distances and sig- 
nal attenuation are many times greater 
than for the low-orbit satellites. 

The schematic in Figure i shows a 
simple control box that incorporates all 
the necessary control functions with 
the least number of parts. Most polar* 
ization relays and remote preamps op- 
erate from 12-14 volts DC, so any 12 
VDC regulated supply capable of one 
to two amps will provide power. If the 
supply is home-brew^ install a fuse with 
the appropriate current rating on the 
AC line. Commercial supplies should 
already have a fuse. 

The purpose of the Simple design is 
to give an easy-to-read and meaningful 
indication of relay or preamp opera- 
tion. The first LED after the power sup- 
ply is simply a power-on indicator, 
while the second shows that the 12 
VDC in-line fuse is intact. The current 
meter provides the simplest means Of 
monitoring the relays and preamps 
with a true indication that the correct 
current ts being consumed by the 
device Or devices that have been acti- 
vated 

Most polarization relays draw about 
100 mA. When a line is energized, the 
expected reading should show on ihe 
meter without change. Loose connec- 
tions are immediately apparent if the 
reading vanes. A short causes spikes 
and may even blow the fuse, but no 
power supply damage occurs and the 
problem can be quickly resotved by 
tracing the line to the antenna. Corro- 
sion over a period of years is usually 
the problem. 

Mast-mounted preamps can draw as 
little as 50 mA up to a few hundred mA 



Amateur Radio Via Satellite 



Before they are installed, each polar- 
ization relay and preamp in use should 
be tested, and the current measured. 
to characterize nominal consumption. 
Labels on the control box for each fine 
are heJpfui. In a typical configuration 
with 100 mA polarization relays and 50 
mA preamps, the current meter shows 
300 mA when ail the remote items are 
activated. The extra line could be used 
for a 1 meter preamp in the shack. 

Cabte to the remote relays and units 
should be good quality rotor cable or 
old coax runs. Avoid cheap rotor ca- 
ble — it will deteriorate with outside ex- 
posure to the elements Eight-conduc- 
tor cable is the best since the extra 
conductors can be connected in paral- 
lel for the ground return. The 1 .000 pF 
capacitors on the control box output 
lines keep stray RF energy out of the 
system. A terminal strip on the back of 
the box provides an easy way to dis- 
connect lines for troubleshooting prob- 
lems that can develop with time. 

My control box has been in operation 
for over 10 years. In that time, I've in- 
stalled several different antennas and 
tried as many preamps, I detected de- 
teriorating cables, isolated faulty re- 
lays, and replaced the current con- 
sumption labels on the front of the box 
whenever a new remote device was 
installed. Of all the hams at shack ac- 
cessories, the control box has been 
one of Ihe most useful 




What is AMSAT? 

Created in 1969, AMSAT is a world- 
wide organization of amateur radio op* 
erators dedicated to educational and 
ham-related activities via satellite, The 
goal Is to build and support satellites 
for open use by amateurs everywhere. 



Photo A AMSATs main office is here in the Washington, DC t area. 



Current operational amateur space- 
craft include; AM SAT-OSCAR -10, 
UcSAT-OSCAFMI, AMSAT-OSCAR- 
13, UoSAT*OSCAR-14, AMSAT- 
OSCAR-16, DOVE-OSCAR-17, WE- 
BER-OSCARS 8, LUSAT*OSCAR*19, 
FUJI-OSCAR-2Q, AMSAT-OSCAR-21 
(also known as RS-14), RS-10/11 and 
RS-12/13. 
Project OSCAR of California began 





Photo C, A Phase 3 Hamsat spaceframe greets visitors as they enter the 
AMSAT office. 



54 73 Amateur Radio Today * June ■, 1991 



Photo B. Martha Saragovitz, 
AMSAT Secretary, takes another 
catt at (301) 589-6062. 

the tradition in 1961 with the launch of 
OSCAR-1 . (OSCAR stands for Orbiting 
Satellite Carrying Amateur Radio, ) In 
recent years, International AMSAT 
groups have adopted location dessgna- 
tors, For North America, this nonprofit 
educational organization is called 
AMSAT^NA. 

Where is AMSAT? 

The easiest way to answer the ques* 
tion, "Where is AMSAT?" is to point 
skyward to the incredible array of ham 
satellites. 

AMSAT-NA is a volunteer associa- 
tion with very few paid employees, it 
has offices in Silver Spring, Maryland 

Continued on page 56 



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Number 1 8 on your Feedback card 



AMS WITH CLASS 



Carole Perry WB2MGP 

Media Mentors. Inc 

P.O. BOX 131646 

Staten Island NY 10313-000$ 

Introduction to KF6PJ 

There are so many teachers and in- 
structors doing so many innovative and 
exciting things with amateur radio! 
Many school teachers and amateur ra- 
dio Instructors have written in to share 
their ideas with others. In upcoming 
columns, I'll feature schools where the 
creative uses of amateur radio are be- 
ing used in the classroom, and 111 high* 
light successful recruiting methods 
used by amateur radio clubs across the 
country. 

In April 1989. I had the pleasure of 
meeting a teacher. Dave Reeves 
KF6PJ. and his wife Bernadeite, at a 
NASA Educator's Conference (for the 
Magellan launch at the Kennedy 
Space Center) in Orlando, Florida, 
Dave and t. being fellow hams, immedi- 
ately found each other. We've been 
corresponding ever since, exchanging 
ideas and classroom experiences. It's 
a personal pleasure for me to show- 
case the wonderful work he's been do- 
ing with amateur radio at the Chami- 
nade College Preparatory School in 
California. The following is the article 
Dave prepared with his students for 
this column— WB2MGP 

High School Club Station WA6BYE 

Dave Reeves KFGPJ: Imagine a 
Space Age high school science class* 
room at Chaminade College Prepara* 
tory in West Mills, California. This week 
the space shuttle Columbia on mis- 
sion STS-35 is in orbit, carrying the 
Astro- 1 observatory and SAREX 
(Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment). 
A large TV screen in the classroom 
displays live video Of the earth from the 
shuttle's payload bay via K6KMN's 
Mount Wilson ham TV repeater. Anoth> 
er large screen computer terminal dis* 
plays the location of the space shuttle 
as it orbits the globe. Several students 
are studying plots of solar panel cur- 



rants and temperature data they have 
just obtained from the DOVE ham 
satellite. 

The students at Chaminade became 
interested in space science when they 
participated in the 1985 SAREX experi- 
ment and got an SSTV picture from 
astronaut Tony England W0ORE on 
the space shuttle Challenger. With the 
help of physics teacher Dave Reeves 
KF6PJ and engineer Mike Tweedy 
KA6SPT, the students have main- 
tained an ongoing space science pro- 
gram using the OSCAR amateur radio 
satellites. 

Now. Sen DeWit and Keith Butler lis- 
ten for the first sounds of the packet 
radio telemetry beacon as DOVE pops 
above the horizon. Their computers 
point the satellite antennas and cap- 
ture today's telemetry data. On the 
NASA TV, an excited scientist in 
Huntsvitle reports data from a distant 
galaxy showing high energy radiation 
from matter " waving good*oye M just 
before being swept into a black hole. 
Chaminade senior Rima MuloJcas 
looks up from a worksheet on the effi- 
ciency of the Microsat solar cell, gazes 
at the live pictures of earth from the 
shuttle, and says. "I don't believe this. 
This is blowing my mind!" Teacher 
Dave Reeves smiles in agreement. 

Articles from The Los Angeles Times 
and Daily News, a stack of video tapes 
with no less than nine network and lo- 
cal TV news reports, and the ARRL 
SAREX video, tell the story of the past 
five years of the students' involvement 
with ham radio in space. 

Encounter with Ron Parise WA4SIR 

"Star Students— Students Tap 
Short- Wave for Long-Distance Reach 
to Shuttle/' This Times headline re- 
ported the latest exciting SAREX 
event. The physics class, with the help 
of 11-year-old Jimmy O'Donnell 
N6VYA T talked with astronaut Ron 
Parise WA4SIR on the Columbia. 

Because of the Astro- 1 astronomy 
mission, the shuttle didn't pass over 
the United States during normal school 




hours; volunteer relay stations in Brazil 
and Australia helped out The morning 
of our contact, Larry Etter N6MBJ used 
Frosty Oden N6ENVs "Valley Re- 
peater" to call AMSAT so that we could 
listen m on Ron and a couple of stu- 
dents. The students were Jim Fonte 
KK9T in Indiana and Dan Blackburn 
K5ZCO in Texas, This session was re- 
layed through PY2BJO Junior, in Sao 
Paulo. Brazil. Our students listened to 
the tape of the contact to try to antici- 
pate what their own contact was going 
to be tike. 

On the evening of December 4, our 
students excitedly gathered on the 
lawn near their classroom to talk to Ron 
themselves. Adam Wahab used the 
computer display set up by Anthony 
Fredericks and Erie Sunde to show the 
1 00 spectators and the press that the 
shuttle was now coming In over the 
Indian Ocean , and would soon be wfth- 




Photo 0. Nicole Newman displays the 
orbital gyrations of DOVE while John 
Fenger and Andy Casciato watch at' 
tentivefy. The Astro- 1 B&XRT (the 
"trash can 1 ') is on the TV screen, 




Photo C. SAREX team Dave Reeves KF6PJ, Jim OVonneit N60YF, Melissa 
Parker, Jimmy O'Donnell N6VYA* Robert Nomura, and Lori Jadon, after making 
contact with Ron Parise WA4SfRon board Columbia on December^ 1990 



Photo A. Eric Sunde, Melissa Parker, and computer group leader Anthony Freder- 
ick watch Columbia's progress on TRACKS AT. 

73 Amateur Radio Today * June. 1991 



in range of the VK6IU tracking slaiion 
in Western Australia. 

Jimmy O'Donnell accessed the 
phone number to the "bridge" in West 
Virginia. Bill Tynan W3XO. at the 
W5RRR club station at the Johnson 
Space Fligh! Center in Houston, was 
soon on the iine. Three other schools 
also joined the bridge. Allen Miller 
N7NHM from Rigby Jr. High School In 
Idaho, Dale Harris WA50AP from Las 
Cruces, New Mexico, and Ron Curry 
WA4GSS from Lawrence County, Ken- 
tucky, were checked in and ready. 
Three relay stations in Australia were 
clearly heard: Gordon VK6IU in West- 
ern Australia; Graham VK5AGR in 
Adelaide; and Art VK2AS in Sydney. 

The shuttle popped above the hori- 
zon near the western AMSAT tracking 
station in Ausiratia, and Ron Parise 
was ready for Jimmy O'Donnell's 
que si ion; "If you saw aliens or a UFO, 
would you try to communicate with 
them, and if so, how? 1 ' Ron replied: 
"You know, we've been looking out the 
window for the Soviet space station 
Mir, They're up here with us, too. We 
have 12 people in orbit right now. 
They're noi exactly a UFO. I don't 
know what I'd do if I saw a UFO out the 
window. Probably just wave/' Alesia. 
another student asked: "How far in 
space can you see?" Ron: "Well, look- 
ing out in space we can see to the edge 
of the universe with our telescopes. 



That's a long, long way. With your 
eyes, looking down on the earth, we 
can see about 800 miles in any direc- 
tion. We are just coming up across 
Shark Bay on the western edge of Aus- 
tralia. If I were looking out the window, l 
could see all the way to Central Aus- 
tralia, and all the way north to Java. We 
can see a big piece of the earth, and 111 
tell you, it's really beautiful from up 
here. ,f 

Andy took the mike next and asked: 
"What do you think might be beyond 
the quasars?'" Ron: "Thai's an inter- 
esting question. Maybe we'll be able to 
shed some light on that with this mis- 
sion. I'm not sure exactly what quasars 
are, but they appear to be very early 
prototypes of galaxies that we see now , 
but we're seeing them so far back in 
time because they're so faraway. Their 
light took a long time to get here. And 
before that, before the beginning of the 
universe, we're not sure what hap- 
pened." 

At this point, Ron was passed to 
Wess VK5AGR in Adelaide. Wess 
asked: "How many stars can you sea 
from orbit that are not visible from 
earth?" Ron: "It's not that we can see 
more stars, but that we can see ultra-vi- 
olet light, UV light gets filtered out by 
the atmosphere, and we can't see it 
from the ground. So that's what's im- 
portant to us here with these tele- 
scopes." Ron said that it is hard to see 



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73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 57 



HAMS ATS 






iic i : 



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■ 






Figure T. OSCAR antenna polarization 
and external preamo control 

on the north side of Washington, DC 
and Pans. Texas, northwest of Dallas, 
Out the satellite consi ruction and sup- 
port programs are active wherever 
AM SAT volunteers live. 

There is no well-defined centra) point 
tor satellite work, although activity can 
always be found in the vicinity of 
AMSAT Vice President of Engineering 
Jan King W3GEY. Jan presently lives 
in me Boulder, Colorado, area 

A visil 10 the modest AM SAT office m 
Silver Spring. Maryland, hints ai the 
broad activities of the organization. 
Here is where memberships and soft- 
ware orders are processed A visitor 



Continued from page 54 
can find satellite drawings, correspon- 
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Several of the original organizers of 
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members of the Board of Directors 
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U.S., as wet l as From Canada, England 
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The success of this organization, 
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country who volunteer their lime to an* 
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demonstrations at hamfests. Their 
' 'pay'* is the satisfaction of helping oth- 
ers enter a truly remark able facet of the 
amateur radio hobby. 

So. the next time you're asked 
M whaf or "where" is AMSAT, jusi 
point up, 




Photo D, A model of AMSATOSCAR-S sits quietly on an office cabinet. 



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Hams With Class 

stars out the window with the lights on 
inside the shuttle, 

Next, Michael in Dale Harris' group 
in Las Cruces. New Mexico, asked: 
•'What are the benefits of the UV Tele- 
scope you are taking up, compared to 
the Hubble?" Ron explained that the 
Astro- 1 UV has a wider field of view 
and a broader spectrum range than 
the Hubble. Heather, also in the 
group, asked: "What kind of emer- 
gency methods do you use in case 
of danger, such as lack of oxygen?" 
Ron said that even if a small hole were 
to be punctured in the shuttle, they 
would be able to maintain their oxygen 
supply long enough to gel safely back 
to earth. 

By now, control had been passed to 
VK2AS in Sydney, and Brian, in Ron 
Curry's group, asked the last question: 
"What do you expect to find concern- 
ing the super nova of 1987?" We are 
not sure of Ron's answer because our 
recorder ran out of tape at this point 
Even so, the astronomy lesson and the 
SAREX contact were a smashing suc- 
cess for amateur radio! 

There were tots of little problems 
during the contact. Signals were lost at 
both ends several times. We missed an 
important "over" and doubled with 
Ron, as our radio had accidentally 
been switched to low power, and our 
audio was scratchy into the repeater. 
Several other schools had trouble with 
audio feedback into the radio, and the 
keys on touch-tone got pushed once or 
twice. Once, Ron lost his footing and 
floated away from the radio for a mo- 
ment. Yet the communication was ex- 
citing, and every school got a chance 
to speak with Ron. Many other re* 
peaters across the country were able to 
call in, listen to the contact, and share it 
with hams interested in SAREX. 

SAREX has brought space science 
alive at Chaminade College Preparato- 
ry and in many other schools across 
the country. Amateur radio can help 
capture the imagination of the new 
generation. There is no doubt that we 
will one day be using ham radios to talk 
to astronauts on the space station 
Freedom, the moon. Mars, and be- 
yond! 

Twenty- Five Years! 

This bnef description of the class- 
room events of the past week illustrate 
(he benefits of getting teachers, kids, 
and schools involved in ham radio. For 
my students and me, ham radio has 
always played an important role. Our 
Chaminade High School Club Station, 
WA6BYE, has been on the air for 25 
years. 

The club's two stations use almost 
every mode and band available: HF. 
VHF. RTTY, SSTV, ATV. satellite, and 
packet. Mike Tweedy KA6SPT de- 
Signed and buill the club a computer- 
controlled satellite antenna rotor sys- 
tem. Our 105-foot HF tower can be 
seen for several miles. 

My students and I have shared many 
memorable ham radio experiences. 
We have worked the entire globe on 
20, 15. and 10 meter DX, workeo" mili- 
tary phone patch traffic during the Viet- 
nam War, and emergency traffic dur- 
ing the Mexico City earthquake. We 



Continued from page 56 
have been a Scout-o-Rama event sta- 
tion. We have worked with OSCARs-8/ 
10712/13/17/19 and RS-10/11. We've 
talked with students in Carole Pern/ 
and Joe Fairctough's classrooms in 
New York City. 

Our most thrilling experiences have 
been the 19B5 SAREX, when we ob- 
tained a great SSTV picture of Tony 
England WQORE, and our 1990 
SAREX conversation with Ron Pa rise 
WA4S1R. 

Ilicrosat — An Ongoing Experiment 

With the launch of the four Microsat 
satellites, we had the opportunity to ful- 
ly integrate ham radio into our physics 
classes. I asked Man a Ei-Zik. a senior 
in the physics class, to explain how the 
project works 

Maria El-ZIk: "I am one of the se- 
niors currently involved in a new exper- 
iment. We are tracking the Microsai 
satellites which have been orbiting the 
earth for about a year. We are currently 
focusing on DOVE i the most attainable 
and readable of the four Microsats. All 
the students in Dave Reeves' two 
physics classes have specific jobs re- 
lated to tracking DOVE. 

"Today, for example, the people in 
charge of predictions were at work first. 
They were in the lab early thus morning 
in order to learn DOVE'S passing times 
for today. This was done with two com- 
puter programs: TRACKSAT and 
ORBS. Then they charted the passing 
times on the blackboard in our physics 
room. 

The operators were at work next. 
People like Ben DeWit and Keith Butler 
track DOVE on the receiver during 
lunch. They obtained 15 pages of data 
from the pass today, a good average. 
Soon other operators w>ll be tracking 
an evening pass. 

"Joe Hafferty and Paul Brukiewa 
created a full-scale model of DOVE, 
complete with antennas thai are white 
on one side, black on the other (made 
so the satellite rotates with the sun's 
natural power), 

"The next group is vital to our experi- 
ment. They give meaning to the data 
obtained by the operators by analyzing 
it and plotting it on graphs. They do all 
this by using computers. This takes 
quite a while, but the results are im- 
pressive We have been able to ana- 
lyze DOVE T s movement by studying 
their graphs. We would also like to 
learn something more about the green- 
house effect by comparing the infrared 
readings taken above land to those out 
on the ocean We are all extremely in* 
teres ted in the result of the analysis 
because we believe the greenhouse ef- 
fect Is the major ecological problem of 
our day. 

"Finally, it is our turn. As the public 
relahons group, we write to various 
places, either obtaining information 
about the Microsats or telling the scien* 
tific community what we are doing, 

"All of us enjoy tracking DOVE. It is 
so much more meaningful to learn 
physics in this way. And we are not Only 
learning the standard science, we are 
learning about computers, data analy- 
sis, and wrrtmg skills This is an experi- 
ment we will all remember for a long 
time.' 



RTTYLOOP 

Amateur Radio Teletype 



Marc t. Leavey, M.D.. WA3AJR 
€ Jenny Lane 
BaiUmom MD 21208 

Portable RTTY 

With the approach of Field Day, I sat 
back and reflected on just how that im- 
pacts on RTTY. On the surface, I get this 
menial image of a Model 15 in a sedan 
chair, being transported to the wilds of the 
outback. When Reld Day was conceived, 
that was exactly what portable RTTY was 
all about, unless you had a Mighty*Mite or 
the like. But not today! 

Sure, the hardy among us might still lug 
along a conventional teleprinter, and 
there are those wel^equtpped cJubs with 
vans sporting every conceivable mode of 
communication but how about the ham 
wishing to operate on a digital mode with- 
out breaking his back? 

For the purposes ol this discussion, I 
would father not concern myself wrth the 
transmitter, receiver, or antenna. Some- 
how I have confidence that these topics 
are adequately covered elsewhere in this 
magazine. Let's just direct our attention to 
the RTTY end of the table. To this end, I 
would like to examine: 

■RTTY interfaces and terminal units 
■Keyboard and control units 
■Printer and hard copy devices 

Decoding the RTTY Signal 

Compared to the ofd tube-type terminal 
units that were popular when 1 started in 
RTTY, the RTTY/packet modems current- 
ly represented are marvels of miniaturiza- 
tion and power conservation Sophisticat- 
ed controllers, such as the AEA PK-232 
and Kantronics KAM. are small enough to 
pack along, and will run on the same pow- 
er supply as the radio. 

For those who choose to roll their own, 
TNC or demodulator boards are available 
from a variety of sources, as well as some 
schematics presented in this column In 
the past, which would enable construction 
of a compact RTTY terminal unit. 

Those whose intent is packet opera- 
tions only 1 and who are in search of the 
ultimate in compactness, might do well to 
look at the Heaih HK-21 . This little marvel 
allows packet operation with a TNC about 
four by three inches, small enough to fit in 
a shirt pocket. 

Packing the Keyboard 

Here we have quite a variety of materi- 
als to choose from, but our latitude de- 
pends on one critical factor: the availabili- 
ty of AC power if the portable station is run 
on conventional AC power, either from a 
generator or the utility company, available 
input/control devices range from dedicat- 
ed RTTY terminals to power users' bit 
crunchers 

Considering space and weight, a case 
coukJ be made for some of the simple. 
aJMn-one styte computers. Such widely 
used, inexpensive, compact devices as 
tne Cotor Computer, Commodore C-64 + 
and the like can make excellent inter- 
faces, especially with a smart terminal unit 
providing much of the logic related to digit- 
al communication. 

Where freedom from AC power is a 
must, notebook computers shine. While I 
have yet to caress one with my own ha rods, 
one hoi computer in this market, by many 
experts' accounts, is marketed under 
three designations: the CompuAdd Corn- 



Number 1 9 on your Feedback card 

panion T the Sharp PC-6220, and the Tex- 
as Instruments TravelMate 20O0. A 80286 
running at 1 2 MH2. with 1 meg of RAM H a 
20 M8 hard disk, and a VGA resolution 
LCD screen, this little wonder comes in 
under $3,000, a remarkable price. And at 
4.3 pounds, and the same size as a sheet 
of bond paper T not too much to carry, e** 
ther 

I might also mention the Zeos Note* 
book, a similar bargain. If you have access 
to art BOSS based portable, and want to 
use it fine! But I. for one, might caution 
against investing in one at this time, with 
alt the new technotogy on the horizon— 
and even in the foreground. 

Hard Copy. Anyone? 

Once again, let's put the big page pnnt- 
ers, and even conventional computer 
printers, aside Portable printers are avail- 
able, and if you want one, quite a few will 
fill the bill 

Canon's BJ~10e is an ink jet that pro- 
duces near laser quality pnnt from a note- 
book sized box. Priced under $500, this 
four pound wonder comes with battery or 
AC power options, as well as a cut-sheet 
feeder. 

For about the same money. Eastman 
Kodak produces the Diconii 150 Plus, 
which handles sheet or fanfotd stock, in a 
compact 1 0.8" x 6.5" x 2" package. With a 
weight under four pounds, including bat- 
teries, rt's hard to resist 

One other option to pack into your bon- 
net: There are several programs around 
which redirect all printer output to a disk 
file With a big enough hard drive, such a 
program can provide a record equivalent 
to paper, without the need to carry around 
boxes of the stuff, plus a printer. 

Tip Department 

So, while you're doing all this setting up 
and the like, wouldn't you like a simple 
Jitile lone generator for testing the setup? 
Well, if you have a PC type computer, and 
BASIC, you have an RY generator. 

James Kretzschmar, DDS, N4HCj\ 
sent along this short little program which 
uses the BASIC SOUND statement to pro- 
duce tones needed for alignment. The 
program, which may be entered into GW- 
BASlCorBASICAis: 

10FORX = 1T0200 
20SOUND2125..5 
30 SOUND 2550, .5 
40 NEXT X 
50 END 

This program compiles directly into 
O u ickB AS IC as well for those who want to 
po ten sky (play with) such things. I invite 
translations of this simple program into 
other dialects of BASIC 

A few months ago I mentioned the new 
TflTY program, for PC compatibles, as 
one new program available for RTTY oper- 
ation. With the file available on Compu- 
Serve and Delphi, I have been watching 
the downloads mount up, and it appears 
mat many of you have enjoyed tne pro- 
gram. I will continue to offer the program, 
at least through the summer, if you have 
no other source for it. Send me a 5* or 3,5* 
blank disk, a self-addressed stamped disk 
rnaiter. and S2 for handling, and I'll turn H 
around as soon as I can. 

As always, I look forward to your in- 
put. Send it to me by mail, at the above 
address, or on CompuServe (ppn 
75036,2501). or Delphi (usemame MAR- 
CWA3AJR}. Watch out for the sun this 
summer (this is Dr. Leavey talking— not 
the ham) T and use sunblock on the kids! 



J 




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73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 59 



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60 73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 



Ne 



Number 20 on your Feedback card 



W PRODUCTS 




FIELDPIECE INSTRUMENTS 

Fieldpiece Instruments has in- 
troduced a small (JV< x2"xf) 
heavy-duty fine of multimeters 
that integrates the functions of a 
digital multimeter, a voltage check- 
er, and a current clamp meter in a 
drop-proof, contamination resis- 
tant housing. The fully sealed yel- 
low Valox case allows the meter to 
withstand exposure to contami- 
nants and drops of up to 10 feet. 
Superior overload protection en- 
ables the meters to withstand 
1,000 VOC and transients up to 



Compiled by Hope Currier 

6.000V on any voltage range. Oth- 
er ranges can withstand 500V. 
Metal oxide varistors, rather than 
tower cost spark gaps, are used 
for transient protection. The two 
standard "Fluke" styte multimeter 
lacks come out the top to accept test 
leads, specially designed probe tips, 
and a specially designed current 
clamp head. All meters include a 
continuity beeper, a "Hold" but- 
ton to lock the display, "Auto-off" 
to extend the battery life, one red 
probe tip, one black test lead, an 
operator's manual, and a rugged 
clear plastic carrying case. Model 
HS23 adds the dangerous red 
LED and beeper and the capaci- 
tance function; Model HS25 adds 
the logic probe, 

Suggested fist prices range 
from $79 to $119 for the meters, 
$24.95 for the Model ACH acces- 
sory current clamp head, $3.95 for 
a pair of standard probe tips, and 
$4.95 for a pair of insulated ex- 
tended (2V2*) probe tips. For 
prices and more information, con- 
tact Fieldpiece Instruments, Inc., 
83228 Artesia Blvd., Buena Park 
CA 90621; (714) 992-1239 (tele- 
phone and FAX), Or Circle Reader 
Service No. 201. 



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A& A ENGINEERING 

A & A Engineering has released 
two new products, 20m and 40m 
QRP portable transceivers. Fea- 
tures include: single-signal re- 
ceiver with a narrow CW crystal 
filter; VFO main and fine tuning, 
which can be set to cover any 50 
kHz of a band; audio derived AGC 



and two stages of audio tittering 
for listening comfort, 5 watts out- 
put when powered from a + 13.8V 
source; semi-QSK T-R switching 
with adjustable delay; CW 
sidetone generator with ad- 
justable delay; and CW sidetone 
generator with adjustable volume. 
Weighing only 27 ounces, this 
transceiver is perfect for back- 
packing. 

The complete kit is priced at 
$159.95, plus $5 shipping. Con- 
tact A & A Engineering, 2521 W. 
LaPalma Unit K, Anaheim CA 
92801; (714) 952-21 14, FAX (71 4) 
952-3280. Or circle Reader Ser- 
vice No. 202. 



CERTIFIED PRODUCTS 
CORPORATION 

The new RED ALERT multi-use 
meter from Certified Products 
Corporation will alert users to the 
sources and intensity of low fre- 
quency radiation, suspected of 
causing cancer, from computers, 
power lines and other electrical 
sources. It will locate hidden or 
buried electrical lines and help 
prevent accidental encounters by 
anyone digging holes, tearing out 
wafls, remodeling or working near 
electrical lines. It is priced at 
$69.95, plus $2.95 S & H. Contact 
Certified Products Corporation, 
2816 East 51st Street, Tutsa OK 
74105-1704; (91$) 743-0269, Or circle Reader Service No, 203. 




NCG 

NCG has introduced a new 
COMET dual-band 2m/70cm 
base/repeater antenna, the CA- 
2x4MAX, centered to the Ameri- 
can amateur frequencies, 146 
MHz/446 MHz. This new antenna 
incorporates COMETs exclusive 
SLC (Super Linear Converter) 
system, which uses parallel ele- 
ments in order to maintain a stable 
resonant frequency over the life of 
the antenna. It also features a new 



jointing system made of durable 
ABS plastic to screw the sec* 
tions together. The CA-2x4MAX 
is 178" long and has a UHF 
(SO-239) connector, The reported 
gain figures are 8.5 dB on 2 me- 
ters and 11*5 dB on 70cm. 

For the price and more informa- 
tion, contact NCG Company, 
1275 N. Grove St., Anaheim CA 
92806; (800) 962-2611, (714) 
630-4541. Or circle Reader Ser- 
vice No. 204. 



TOWNSEND ELECTRONICS 

For those who must use an NT 
as a mobile rig, Townsend Elec- 
tronics has introduced the "Rig 
Saver" universal hand-held/mo- 
bile radio mount. You can now 
safely mount your handheld or 
small mobile rig where you can 
see the rig's controls and digital 
display, and have maximum ac- 
cess to the controls. A vinyLcoat- 
ed plate protects the rig from 
scratches while in use. Large 
knobs make it easy to adjust to 
any angle for nearly any HT or 
small mobile. This mount will fit on the console, center hump, engine 
enclosure or dash of virtually any vehicle. 

The "Rig Saver" is available in two models; the Slimline ($24,95) and 
the Rough-Duty ($29.95). Add $3 S & H; Indiana residents add $% sales 
tax. Contact Townsend Electronics, Box 415, Pierceton IN 46562; (800) 
338-1665. Or circle Reader Service No. 205. 




HAM JEWELRY COMPANY 

HAM Jewelry is offering an ex- 
cellent station clock, the World 
Time Clock. This clock lets users 
read at a glance not only their own 
local time but also the time any* 
where in the world, without any 
conversions. The names of 65 cit- 
ies and countries are displayed 
around the clock's periphery, and 
the local hour at those places is 
read by the adjacent number on 
the QTR ring. Minutes are read 
from the minute hand; GMT is 
read directly from the 12 o'clock 




position. There is also a polar pro- 
jection map of the world on the 
clock's face, showing the world's 
time zones.' 

The World Time Clock comes in 
a brushed goldtone metal case 
with a bright, polished faceted 
bezel It will run for approximately 
one year on a single "C" celt alka- 
line battery (not included). The 
price is $79.95, plus $5 for insured 
S & H. Contact HAM Jewelry 
Company, 26 Edgecomb Road, 
Binghamton NY 13905; (607) 
797-5458. Or circle Reader Ser- 
vice No. 206, 



AMPIRE INC. 

Ampire Inc. is offering new and 
improved model 146, 1460S, and 
440 RF switchable mast-mounted 
preamplifiers for 2m and 70cm, 
enclosed in extruded aluminum 
and irradiated to minimize oxida- 
tion. The plastic-coated circuit 
board repels moisture and corro- 
sion. The preamplifiers have been 
designed to operate from + 1 30 S F 
to -30 Q R 

For more information and prices, 
contact Ampire lnc. t 10240 Nathan 
Lane, Maple Grove MN 55369; 
(612) 425^7709, Or circle Reader 
Service No, 207. 



73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 61 



Number 21 on your Feedback card 



Abo ve and beyond 

VHF and Above Operation 



CL Houghton W8WGP 
San Diego Microvmve Group 
6345 Badger Lake Ave, 
San Diego CA 921 19 

Lasers and Amateur 
Communications 

Does "laser" give you thoughts of some 
star war device, or just something you 
would like lo experiment with? What can 
you do with a laser besides drive your 
neighbors crazy with mysterious spots of 
red fight all over the neighborhood? How 
about using it as part of an amateur corn* 
munications system? Many devices now 
incorporate a laser, which for the amateur 
means surplus avail a bi llty .sooner or later . 
Supermarket checkout scanners are an 
example of this. Other sources are disc 
players, printers, and optica) scanners. 
Look tor them at swap meets. 

What does it take to construct a grass 
roots laser system? I don't want to get into 
the fine details on lasers and light frequen- 
cy relationships, only to give you enough 
information to gel started, II you want 
more details, there are quite a few good 
books for the eKperimenter One such 
book ts The Laser Cookbook, by Gordon 
McComb it costs about $18 from Tab 
Books, and its well worth the price, 

There will be three parts to this topic, the 
first covering basics and the power sys- 
tem, the second detailing the receiver sys- 
tem, and the third describing high sensitiv- 
ity receiver modifications using 
photo-multiplier tubes. 

Tube Testing 

Surplus, a helium- neon (HeNei laser 
with power supply should be less than 
$100. With only the plasma tube, cost 
should be quite a bit less. Watch out for 
used lubes; unless you can tesl them, you 
can't be sure they'll work. If they Ye bad. 
you can't fix them, unless you are into 
glass blowing and able to recharge the 
gas mixture under vacuum conditions. 

Plasma tubes (uncased lasers), as well 
as heads (cased lasers with ballast resis- 
tors) have to be tested with a power supply 
to verify their condition. What happens to 
old faser tubes? Why will some of them not 
function? In time, ihe seals leak; they lose 
gas, and the helium-neon mixture won't 
ionize- However, the books I have read all 
stale that the newer tubes have much bel- 
ter seals, and this is not such a problem 
with them 

An excellent supplier of lasers and laser 
equipment, both new and surplus, is MWK 
Industries They also stock technical 
books on lasers. Their address is MWK 
Industries. 1296 W Pomona, Building 
110, Corona California 91720, Tel, (714) 
27M563, I can supply 10 kV 50 mA 
diodes, which you will need for the power 
supply, from my local surplus store for $7 
for 6 diodes, postpaid U.S.A. I'll also keep 
a look out for 1 00 pF ca pac i to rs . 

System Components 

Component parts to gather for a laser 
communication system include a power 
supply (high voltage, for the laser), and a 
12 VDC muffin fan (or the system transmit- 
ter The murfin fan "chops" the laser 
beam near a 10QG Hz rate; the spinning 



blades make a tone that can be detected 
on the system receiver. The receiver 
needs a large aperture lens, a photosensi- 
tive detector, and an audio amplifier to re- 
cover the 1000 Hz tone. The audio amplifi- 
er in this case is the system receiver. This 
month I will cover details of the high 
voltage power supply that you need in or- 
der to place a laser (He Ne) into operation. 

Safety 

Be very careful when working with a 
laser power supply. Don'! be fooled, 
though it only delivers a few mtlliamperes 
at 3 kv\ it can be lethal . Put the supply in 
an enclosure with a good ground system 
and use a 110 VAC 3-WIRE CORD. Pro- 
tect yourseif from accidental contact with 
the high voltage, 

Ateo . the PC board you mount the rectifi- 
ers and other high voltage components on 
has to be elevated from the metal enclo- 
sure and chassis, and these from each 
other, to prevent high voltage leakage and 
accidental contact. 

You can make a compact power supply 
by using a rubber type of potting mix lo 
improve the breakdown insulation resis- 
tance . if you do not pot. you can coat some 
oi me components with a Corona dope, a 
thick paint-on high voltage material that 
prevents high voltage leakage. 

Inside the Tube 

A starting pulse of about 10 kV must be 
impressed across each of two electrodes 
to ignite Ihe gas in the HeNe tube into a 
high energy state Usually 1500 to 3000 
vote is needed to maintain this state. After 
the gas in the tube becomes ionized, ii 
energizes Ihe gas in the capillary tube, 
which produces a laser beam. Each end of 
the laser tube has two mirrors, one fully 
mirrored and the other partially mirrored. 
At the tatter end, the beam exits the lube. 

The laser is maintained in this high en* 
ergy state by a lower power supply voltage 
Of 1 8 to 2.5 k V The supply must be capa- 
ble of delivering several milliamperes of 
current at this voltage. The exact amount 
of current needed depends on the type 
and power ouipuiin mi Hi watts of your laser 
tube. This DC current could vary Irom 
about 3 to 7,5 mA for a \Q mW HeNe laser. 

The first power supply I built used a 1 kV 
transformer (AC) with a voltage doubter 
providing about 2.5 kV to run the laser I 
used a Strobe transformer to provide the 
starting pulse. It worked, but was some- 
what fussy. I wanted something better 

Our local surplus store had several high 
voltage ion generator PC boards (incom- 
plete) Located on the board was a series 
circuit using high voltage capacitors and 
diodes, forming a voltage quadrupler 
Parts were rated at 15 kV. i removed the 
unnecessary components and attached 
the quadrupler to the output of my 2 5 kV 
supply, and multiplied the 25 kV power 
supply output to just over 10 kV. It worked 
well the first time. 

The quadruple r will not sustain high cur- 
rent operation. As soon as the gas is ion- 
ized, the tube starts to draw current and 
sort of disconnects the quadrupler from 
the circuit, then reverts to the 2.5 kV main 
power suppEy voltage See Figure 1 tor ihe 
power supply schematic. 




Photo Jack Askew VE4JX and his hom&buiU 20-foot 432 MHz EME dish antenna m 
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, 



The trick to this scheme is that the ion 
generator capacitors {100 pF) are not 
capable of much current, but they allow 
voltage multiplication. As thts higher 
current flows through the quadrupler 
diodes, which are now just a series net- 
work, no multiplication takes place when 
the last's cu r ren: is drawn, See Figure 3 
for details of the voltage quadrupler 

Test your power suppiy unloaded, then 
test it with a resistive load before you con- 
nect it to a laser tube, I use an RCA Senior 
VoltOhmist with a high voltage (15 kV) 
probe. I measured the power supply out- 
put voltage (starting voltage) unloaded, 
and it was just over 10 W. With a resistive 
load, it dropped to 2.5 kV. 

Limiting the Current 

The next necessary item for a universal 
laser power supply is the ballast resistor, 
the only way to limit current to the laser 
tube. You have to realize that some power 
needs to be dissipated. 2 5 kV at a few mA 
are a couple of wans oi power The resis- 
tors must behighvafue, around 100k. in 
series, and be capable of dissipating 
the power. In my power supply. I used a 
large quantity of 100k 2W resistors; I 
paralleled two of I hem and made a 
string of 50k resistors, I put five similar 



resistors in my output stack. If power 
supply voltage is lower, near 1.8 kV, 
less ballast resistors will be required 

When applying power to an un- 
known laser tube, use as high a value 
of ballast resistor as you can. It's easier 
lo cut the value of the resistor than to 
obtain a new tube Some tubes require 
a critical value of ballast resistor tor 
proper operation. Laser tubes are all 
different, even tubes from the same 
manufacturer. 

It a tube "sputters" when power is 
applied, the ballast resistor must be 
trimmed. The current is either too 
great, causing discharges, or too little, 
causing the current to fold back and 
the tube to Iry to re-ignite itself. Sput- 
tering sou nds Ii ke a ticki ng i n sid e t he tu be . 
Take care when trimming the resistor. Too 
much current hastens the death of a laser. 

My 10 mW tube runs with 2.5 kV at 7.5 
mA. I have a ballast resistor of 250k, five 
dual resistor assemblies of two 1 00k resis- 
tors each. Additionally, my laser "head/' 
a tube mounted inside a metal assembly, 
has an internal 180k ballast resistor. A 
smaller rated laser, say 2 mW f would re- 
quire less current, Best operation is when 
you get good turn-on at towest tube cur- 
rent with reliable operation. Connect a 



■ 






testis** r 2S~I*5 

«iii tlOv in 



"fl-4C 











iCQijF 






- .■ ■ 



.- - 



CiAW^E 



-TS 



— 



^v 



i»0Ofc 



•r-v. 



Figure t The laser power suppty, an AC transformer SSOVflkV secondary. The vottage 
quadrupler provides the 10kV, tow current starting pulse. 



62 73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 



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64 73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 





Figure 2* The laser transmitter, DC muffin 
fan blades chop the laser beam at approxi- 
mately i kHz. 

well-insulated current meter in series with 
your laser to determine the current drawn. 
[Ed Now: Do not look directly into any 
laser beam as it could be hazardous to 
your eyesight. Take appropriate precau- 
tions] 

Mailbox Comments 

Lyle K1 HR of Littleton, New Hampshire, 
is getting ready tor Field Day '91. He's 
building the FET switcher from the August 
'90 column, Lyfe intends to use the switch- 
er io provide AC power for his packet sta- 
tion remote. He'll also use ttie switcher in 
the laser power supply, and the 1 1V sup- 
ply (to be covered m part 3 of mis series). 
As he mentions, the switcher is versatile. 
Marion Brimberry of Alma, Illinois, writes 
that he made the FET switcher kit h and fit 
worked great, powering from + 1 2 volts to 
1 10 AC, using the IRFP-140R transistor 

A couple of noies on using the switch- 
ers I found thai you can reduce a voftage 
spike on the FET s drain by placing a se- 
ries 5 ohm resistor and A 0.1 uF capacitor 
on each drain to ground If the spike is high 
enough (around 100 V), it can puncture 
and destroy the FET, The resisior-capaci- 



Figure 3. The voltage quadruplet details. 
All diodes are 6 kV at 130 rnA VARQ H- 
1601-6 (surplus diodes). Capacitors, 100 
pfi 50 of to 200 pf should vrork OK. 

tor network helps prevent this These val- 
ues are for €0 Hz, and will have to be ad- 
justed for different frequencies. 

Ross VK2ZRU of Forestalls, Australia, 
working with Alan VK2AXA, used the San 
Diego Microwave booklet on 10 GHz to 
construct a srnafl horn antenna and a sig- 
nal source. He is about to etch a PC board 
for a 1 GHz Transceiver, and ts looking for 
microwave relays (SMA type). Microwave 
surplus is not plentiful in Australia, and 1 
will try to assist Ross in locating some sur- 
plus postage stamp coax relays. 

Z5th Central States VHF Conference 

The 25th CentraJ States VHF Confer- 
ence will be held Jury 25-28 at the Shera- 
ton Inn in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. It's open to 
everyone. This yea/ Rod Blocksome HI 
0OAS and his staff are planning an excel- 
lent series of activities and technical pre- 
sentations. They're looking for speakers 
and technical papers. All questions should 
be directed to Rod Blocksome KGDAS, 
690 East View Drive. Rob bins, Iowa 
52328: (319) 393-8022. Or contact Ron 
Neyens NfCIH, 8616 C. Ave. Ext., Manon 
f A 52302-9524; (31 9) 377-3207. 

As always I will be glad to answer ques- 
tions pertaining to this and other mi- 
crowave related subjects. Best 73's, 
Chuck WB6IGP 



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Number 22 on your Feedback card 



FECIAL EVENTS 

Ham Doings Around the World 



Listings are fr&& of charge as space permits. Please send us your Special 
Event two months in advance of the issue you want it to appear in. For 
example, if you want if to appear in the January issue, we should receive it by 
October 31. Provide a clear, concise summary of the essential details about 
your Special Event Check /HAMFESTS on our BBS (603-525^438) for 
listings that were too late to get into publication, 



JUNl 



KNOXVILLE, TN The RAC of Knoxvill* will host 
the 2Sth annual Amateur Radio/Computer Con- 
vention a: the Knoxviile Convention Center from 9 
AM -5 PM VE Exams on site Advance tic* ers %4 
45 a! the door For advance tickets mail check and 
SASE to RA.CK, PO So* 124. PCnoxvtlfo TN 
37901 For tables and info contact Steve Ftifts 
WAtGZE, 400 Tebav Ln„ KnonriBe TN 379 fa 
(§15} 535-0801 

A T HENS , GA The At hens RC will hokj its annual 

Hamfesi at VfW Post 2872, Sunset Dr., beg inning 
at 8:3ti AM. Admission S3, 15 and under free, Rea 
Marker and Tailgating spaces $2 each VE Ex- 
ams Tal k-l n on 1 46. 745/ - . Co ntact Joe Londeree 
KC4EJY. (404) 353-8 196 

CLEVELAND, TN Tne Cleveland ARC will spon- 
sor an event at the Bradley County High School 
from 9 AM-* PM VE Exams. Admission fi. Ta- 
bles S4 Free outdoor tailoring with paid admis- 
sion Talk-in on 147 180 Contact David Evans 
WD4EZC, (615) 472- 1421. 

HERMON , ME The Pme State ARC will sponsor 
the Bangor Ham lest at Hermon Elementary 
School from a A M -2 P M . Free parking . Adm isskjn 
S2. VE Exams. Talk-in on 146 34/94, Call {207} 
$48-3846 day or night . 

TEANECK, NJ Bergen ARA will host an event at 
Fairietgh Dickinson Unrv , from 6 AM-2 PM, Ad- 
mission Buyers t2. setters SS. chddron free Free 
parking VE Exams from 9 AM-noon H walk-m onry 
Exams contact Pete Adefy K3WWR 13-30 Ed- 
ward St.. Fakiawo NJ 074tQ. (201) T9&4622. 
Tafr-in on VV2AKR f 46, 790, General contact: Jim 
Joyce K2ZO. 286 Htigewood 8*vd No, Wtst- 
WQOdNJ97675, {201)664-8725. 

KITCHENER, ONT, The 17th annual Central 
Ontario Amateur Radio Flea Market, co-spon- 
sored by The Guelph ARC and the Kilchener-Wa- 
terloo ARC. will be held at Singeman Park from 8 
AM-2 PM. Admission 15. children 12 and under 
free, Vendor tables 16 per 6" space (no outside 
vendors). TaJMn on KSR- 146.37/97. 2MG- 
144 61, 145.21: simplex 52/52 Make ai checks 
payable to Central Ontario Amateur Radio Flea- 
market, and send id Fteamarftef Chairman, Ray 
Jennings VE3CZE 81 Ottawa Crescent. Gub&i 
Ontario N1E2AB. Phone (519)822-8342 

ALAMOGORDQ, N W The Aiamogordo ARC will 

conduct VE Exams at the Alamooordo Mid High 
School, south entrance, beginning at 12 noon. 



JUN 2 



MANASSAS, VA The Die Virginia Hams ARC 
will sponsor the Manassas Hamf est/Computer 
Snow at the William County Fairgrounds Open to 
taiigaters at 7 AM and Id the general public at 8 
AM Admission 55. taigatmg $5 addmonal par 
apace, Wh cc i cnaa -acewtWe. Talwn on 14637/ 
97 and 223 06/224 66 Cdmrnercal vendors con- 
tact Jao* Kf4 VP, (703) 36 J -5255 For into cafl Jim 
WD4QJY, (703) 369-3940 

CHELSEA, Ml The Chelsea ARC r Inc., will spon- 
sor the 1 4th annual Chelsea Swap N Shop at the 
Chelsea Fair Grounds. Wheelchair accessible, 
Set-up at 6 AM, Donation $3. YL's. XYL's and kids 
under 1 2 free Tables $9 per 8 Trunk sale, $33 per 
space Ladies tables welcome. For info, send 
SASE to Robert Schanu. 416 Wttkinsoet St., 
CheiseaMf48U8.oiQaM{3t3)4?5-t795 

NEWINGTON.CT The Newmgton ARL wfl hold 
its annual Amateur RadoJComputer Flea Market 
at me Newington High School from 9 AM-2 PM. 
TdiigaJmg, weather permitting. Guided (ours of 
ARRL HO and W 1 AW VE Exams by preH-egistra- 
iion only, Regisler wiih Susan Frednckscn 
WMiB, PO Box 165, Pleasant Valley CT 06063, 
General admission S3. Tables $12. For tables and 
Info contact Les Andrew KA 1KRP, cfo MARL, 68 
Wildermere Ave, Waterbury CT 06705 (203) 
523-0*53, SASE for confirmation. 

PRINCETON, IL The Starved Bock Radio Dub 
Hamtest wHl be heid at the Bureau County Fair- 
grounds beginning at 6 AM Advance tickets are 
S4 before May 20th and S5 al the gate Camping 
ana outdoor Flea Market area is free 8 indoor 
tables are S10 each Talk-tn on 146.355/955. 
Coniact Brjce Burton KU9A, r 153 Umon St.. Mar- 
seilles IL 61 341 ■ f 710. ($1$) 795-2201. 

QUEENS, NY The Hall ol Science Hamf est win 
be held at the New York Halt of Science parking 
tol Doors open ai 9 AM, Set up after 7 30 AM. 
Free parking. Donation for buyers. $4. sellers $6 



per space. Talk-In on 445.175 repeater and 
146 52 simplex. Coniact (at night). Steve nbaum 
WB2KDG, (718} 898-5599 or Amte Scttiffman 
WB2YXB. (718} 343-0172 (Rain dale Is June 
9ih.) 

ROME, GA TneMW Georgia ARCw* celebrate 
Is 60th Anniversary by hosting a big pcnic at 
Floyd College, US 27. Alt hams tnvrted 1 Bring one 
covered dish per family Fishing and bal games. 
Talk-in on 146 94 

CONTOOCOOK. NH The annual Spring Flea 
Markei. sponsored by the Contoocook Valley RC, 
will be held from 8 AM -3 PM. Tailgallng Direc- 
lions: At Concord ISiH take 1-89 North 14 mNes to 
Exll 7 (Rte 103), East one half mile, on iJie left. 
From the West, take Rte 202/9 East to 1-89 Morn 
5 miles to Exit 7, then East. Follow signs for park- 
ing. Admission Sellers (5. buyers $1 Talk-in on 
146 895 and 146 94 repeaters, and 52 sknpeaL 
Info KlOPO0pajWAlWOt(-2.orevBfiina9(6O3) 
746-5080 

BUTLER, PA The Breezesnociers of Western 
Pennsylvania announce their 37th Annual Ham- 
lestiCompuierfest, to be held from B AM-4 PM at 
the Butler Farm Show Grounds. Mobile check-in 
on 28.495 and 1 46,520. Direciions and Talk-in on 
147.96/. 36. Ry-in available at ftoe Airport Admis- 
sion is $1 at the door Free outdoor Flea Market 
space. Free parking. Wheelchair accessible- In- 
door vendor space is available. Tables are $10 
each in advance, on a first come first served basts 
Overnight camping, hookups available ^EC 
Testing by pre-regtstration only For into send 
SASE to Rey Whanget W3WS. Box 8, BD Z 
Chaswiek PA 15024, (4 12) 82S-2393. For reser- 
vations and info sand check and SASE to George 
Artnak N3FXW, 3350 Appel Rd., Bethel Park PA 
15102 {412} 833-3395 



JUN7 



CAMfLLUS, NY VE Exams will be held al the 
Town of Camillus Municipal Bldg. beginning al 7 
PM Test tee for Technician through Extra class is 
$5 25 Tajk-in on 1 47 300 Please bring two forms 
of 10 and a copy of your license Coniact John 
Patchett KB2ERJ. 01 S) 487-0298 



JUN9 



LANCASTER, NY The Lancaster ARC will 
sponsor the Lancaster New York Hamfesi at the 
Elks Club Hall (across Irom the Lancaster P.O.). 
Admission $4, includes 8 outdoor Flea Markei 
space, Talk-In on 146.550 simplex or 224.640 re- 
peater. Contact Chairman Luke Cattanno 
N2GDU. 1 105 Ransom Rd. , Lancaster W Y 1 4086, 
(716} 683-8880: Nick WA2CJJ, 5845 Genesee 
St.. Lancaster NY 14086, (7 16} 681 -84 10: George 
BXM. (716) 894-0343 

WINFIELD/CENTRAL. PA SVARC. Inc. and 
Milton ARC wi sponsor an event at the Wmfseld 
Fireman s Grounds. 60 mbes north of Hamsburg 
on US Route 15. VE Exams Free parking Admis- 
sion K Tailgate and table space at Si per 6 
Talk-In on 145.16/78 and 146.82/.22 Wme to 
SVARC, the.. Box 73, Httmmels Wharf PA 17831 
(717) 473-7050. Packet KD3KR # NR3U 

WILLOW SPRI N GS , JL The 34th AnnuslHam- 
fest sponsored by the Si* Meter Club of Chicago, 
Inc., wril be held at Sania Fe Park. Tickets S3 in 
advance, 54 at the gate Large Swapper's Row. 
Free parking No overnight parking. Gates open at 
6 AM Talk-in on K90NA 146 52 Of K90NA re- 
peater 37-97. Gel advance tickets from Wi*e Car- 
tea K9E NZ 606 South Ftnton Ave., Romeovde 
H 6044 T. or from any Club member 

ERLANGER, KY The Northern Kentucky ARC 
will sponsor 'HAM-O^RAMA 91 " at the E danger 
Kentucky Lions Park beginning al 6 AM, Flea Mar- 
ket sei-up at 6 AM. Advance tickets are (4, $5 at 
the gate, with children under age 1 3 admitted Iree. 
Flea Market spaces are $2 each (tables MOT fur- 
nished) Indoor vendor space $15 per table (pro- 
vided). For info, regisiration. contact LC4fETc/o 
NKARC. POBox 1062. Covington KY 4Wt2 
(606 1 341-1213. Talk -in on 147.855V 255 or 
147 975/375. 

GRANITE CITY, IL The Egyptian Radio Dub 
wfl hosi the annual EGYPTlANFEST al the dub 
grounds on Chouteau Place Rd. beginning at 6 
AM and ending wrth I he main prize drawing about 
2 PM Advance tuckets are $i each or 6/S5; S2 
each or 3/$5 at the door License testing will be ai 
the Sanford Brown Business College. 3237 W. 
Chain of Rocks Rd Exam sign-up will be 8 AM - 
9:45 AM at the hamf est. Saturday night camping 
is available at the clubgrounds. Talk-m on the 



ERC-W9AIU 146.76 repeater, Contaci Jim C/e- 
iBrtd K9RKU, PO 8ox 562, Granite City 11 62040 
(618)344-2401. 

NEAR AKRON. OH The Goodyear ARC will 
sponsor the 34th Annua) Hamf est/Family Picnic al 
Wingtoot Lake Park. Family admission is $4 in 
advance, S5 at the gate The Picnic and Flea Mar 
ket wM be from 8 AM-4 PM Inside tables S6 in 
advance. Outside Flea Market 13 per vehicle No 
ovemighipaddng.no pets, no swimming. For info 
and advance tickets: Wttliam F Dunn W&iFM, 
4730 Nottingham Lane, Stow OH 44224 (216} 
673-8502 



JUN 14-16 



BURBANK, ALBERTA The Central ARL will 
hold tneir 19th Annual Picnic at the Burba nk 
Campground, located at the confluence of Blind- 
man and Red Deer Rrver Va&eys Semhpnvaie 
camp s4es available by reservation Registration 
starts Fri. afternoon . Camping fees: $ 1 5 per I amity 
una\ Si per smgle unit; $10 for weekend private 
stai; Sat evening barbecueASance; *5. SStofCW- 
dren under 12. $6 per weekend pass ino camp- 
ing) Contact Pal Wight VE6ALD, 886-3883 or 
took for a message on the CARL BBS VE6BJH. 
Talk-in on VE6UK 147 150+0 600 MHz, or 
146.520 MHz simplex. 



JUN15 



C0RTLAN0 h NY The Skyline ARC will present 
the 9th annual Cortland International Ham lest 
from 7 AM-3 PM at the Cortland County Fajr- 
grounds (breakfast at 6 AM). Outdoor Rea Market 
spaceSl Indoor space avaiafete Advance tickets 
S3. $4 at the gate, under 14 admitted free SASE 
by Jure l st lo S-A.RC. Bom 5241. CorflSand NY 
13045 Talk-tn on 147 825/ 225 

CHERRY HILL, NJ The South Jersey Radio 
Assn., Inc., will hosi a gala Dinner at the Cherry 
Hill Inn to celebrate I heir Diamond Anniversary, 
An Informal gathering will begin at 6 PM with a 
cash bar, followed by dinner at 7 PM. Tickets are 
$25 each and you may bring a guest Arrange- 
ments have been made with Cherry HHI Inn for 
special room rates. For hotel reservations call 
(609) S6?-7a»andtel them you wilf be attending 
the SJRA Dinner on the 15th The special room 
rales are $62 single, $65 double; includes use of 
all hotel Tackles and a full breakfast on Sun 
morning For SJRA Dinner tickets, enclose SASE 
and check/money order { $25 for each ticket) and 
mail to Frances Wktmann WA2N8E, SovmJemy 
Radio Assn , PO Box l02S t Haddonfietd NJ 
08033, before the May 81 h deadline. 



JUN 15-16 



GLEN DIVE, MT The Lower Yellowstone AR 
System will host the 32nd Annual Fathers Day 
Hamfesi Picnic al the Dawson County Fatr- 
grounds VE Eiams Sat ai 1 PM. There will be a 
hosted breakfast on Sun Sun Pot-Luck Dinner at 
i PM Adult registration $6 each, kids free 



JUN 16 



SANTA MARIA , CA The Satellite ARC wi hokt 
its annual Santa Maria Radio Swapfest/Barbecue 
ai (he Union Oil Company Newlove Picnic 
Grounds soulh oi Santa Maria, from 9 ArvM PM, 
Tables are available at 7 AM for $5. Top Sirioin 
Barbecue at 1 PM, $8 for adults, $4 for children. 
Free parking. Talk-in on 146.94 Contact Esther 
Miller, POBox 2067, OrcyttC A 93457-2067 (805} 
937-8378 

CAMBRIDGE, UA TAILGATE Electronics. 
Computer and Amateur Radio FLEA MARKET , 9 
AM-? PM at Albany and Won St Sponsored by 
the MIT Electronics Research Society, the MfT 
Radio Society, the MfT UHF Repeater Assn and 
the Harvard Wireless Club Admission $1 50. Free 
oft-street parking. Covered lailgaie area. Sellers 
$3 per space at the gale. $8 in advance-includes 
one admission. Set-up al 7 AM. Mail reservation 
payments before June 5lh lo W1GSL, PO Box 82 
MIT BR., Cambridge MA 02139 Talk-in on 146.52 
and 449 726/444 J25-pJ 2A-W1 XM repeater 

STEVENS POINT, WI The Central WI Radio 
Amateurs. Lto. will hold its 14th annual 
SWAPFEST at the University Center on me Uniw. 
of vYisconsin-Stevens Point campus Free park- 
ing Wheefchair accessible VE Exams, Tables 
and eiecthcay «■ be avaMabte for co mme r cia l 
vendors Contact An* l+y$oc*i N9BCA, CWRA 
Swaptest C/ia/rmaa 3356 April Lane. Stevens 
Point WI 54481, (715)344-2984 

FREDERICK, MD The Frederick ARC will hold 
its Annual Ham lest at the Frederick County Fair- 
grounds from 8 AM-4 PM Admission $4, wives 
and children free wrth one paid admission. Tail- 



gal ers $5 for each 10' apace, Indoor exhibitor ta- 
bles $10, For info write to Frederick Hamfest, PO 
Box 589. hit Airy MD21771. 



JUN 22 



COOKEVILLE, TN Tne Upper Cumberland 
ARS w4 host a free TaJgaie event at the USDA 
Bldg Farmers Market Section on Bunker Htfftj , 
from 8 AM-3 PM. Set-up ai 7 AM (CST). TaJk-m on 
145 11/51 Contact Km Roberts, Rt, 4, Sox 307. 
Cookevtfte TN 38501. 

LEMPSTER, NH The Connecticut Valley FM 
Assn. will sponsor a Hamlesl/Fteamarkei from 7 
AM-2 PM al the Goshen-Lempster Coop School 
gym, Route 10 in Lempster. Free parking. Auc- 
tion . Picn ic. Adm issio n $ 1 . Table or space $5 each 
(plus 1 free admission! Talk-in 146,16/76 Con- 
tact Conrad Ekstmm WBlGXM, PO Box W76, 
OammontNH 03743-1076 (803)543-1389 

SPECIAL EVENT STATIONS 



jus i 



HACIENDA HEIGHTS, CA The Mercury ARA 
will pantcipale in a community Emergency Pre- 
paredness Fair from 180GZ-230GZ. Members will 
opera) e using their own call signs. Third party traf- 
fic for Fair pairons will be encouraged. Frequen- 
cies: 26.3 to 28.5 on 10 meter phone band, For a 
certificate, send QSL and SASE to MARA. Attn: 
WA6BZX, 2751 MonteiJano, Hacienda Heights 
CA91745 



JUN 1-2 



TROY, OH Station VY8FW w* operate 14002- 
22002 to commemorate 'Strawberry Festival " 
Frequencies; 25 kHz up from the General 40 me- 
ter band and 10 meter Novice band. For certifi- 
caie, send QSL and SASE to KS8Z, 1408 Cornish 
Rd. , Troy OH 45373- 12 12. 

MADISON, OH The Wireless Institute ot North- 
ern Ohio {WING), sponsored by ihe Lake County 
ARA, will be on the air Sat. evening between 
23302 -030CZ on 7235 and 21 315 kHz, and Sun. 
from 1500Z-t900Z on 21315 and 28490 kHz, to 
commemorate Ohio Wine Month. The station cal 
sKOeO A speaaJ B^x n QSL certificate wJbe 
avajtabie from K08O-WN0 Weekend, 104 18B& 
at H* KSrtfsnd OH 44694 Send a legal 
SASE. 



JUN t- 15 



HADDONFIELD, NJ The South Jersey Radio 
Assn . will operate K2AA on all bands June 1 - 1 5 to 

celebrate 75 continuous years devoted to ama- 
teur radio. SJRA will offer an attractive QSLmark- 
ino the event. To confirm contact send a QSL and 
a SASE to South Jersey Radio Assn., PO 8ok 
W2$. HaddonfieidNJ 08033 



JUN 6 -fl 



MENA, AR The OuachJta ARA will operaie 
KG500 from 13002-24002 m conjunction with 
the annual Lum and Abner Days" honortngj Chet 
Lauck and Noms Goff of earty Broadcast Rado 
fame Operation will be in the tower 25 kHz of 40, 
20, 15 meter General phone bands, and 28.350- 
400 MHi For certificate send QSL and 9 * 12 
SASE to Jack Brewer KG5QO, Rl f. Box 13T, 
Hatfield AR 71945. 



JUN9-1 



AUBURN, W A The Academy ARC will operate 
K7AC during ihe week Of June 9-l6lh. to com- 
rnemorats Aubwn's Centennial Operation will be 
(nmetow«f25k>LTOttheGerwraibarw±5aswe4ia5 
the lOmeaar Novice phone band There w* be an 
inkxmaJ net of U.S. AubMrnt (there are about 22 of 
them) held on June 16th at 2200 UTC on 14 240 
MHz QSlvw WA7QCC. 35 13 Orchard PtaceSE* 
Aubvm WA 98002. 



JUN 17-21 4 24^28 



JOPLIN, MO The Joplin ARC will operate 
K5ALU Won. through Fri from 2000Z-0200Z, 
From Ihe Frank Childress Boy Scout Reservailon, 
to encourage youth participation in ham radio. 
CW-7 050. 14.05a rjhorw-lower 25 kHz of the 
General *0. 20 and 15 meter bands and Ihe upper 
50 kHz of the Novice 10 meter band. For QSL 
send QSt* name of operator wonted, and SASE to 
Jbpan AftC POBox 2983. JopUn MO 64803 



JUN 22 



LAKE KEYSTONE, OK Lake Keystone OK Ma- 
sonic Oisl 12 Assn will operaie N5MBD/P Irom 
1300Z-2200Z during Ihe annual State-Wide Ma 
sonic Rally on the 10 meter Novice phone band. 
For certificate, send QSL and large SASE to Ma- 
sonk Dm 12 Assn., PO Box 182, Owasso OK 
74055, 






73 Amateur Radio Today • June. 1991 65 



Number 23 on your Feedback card 



Ask k a boom 

The Tech Answer Man 



Michael X Geier KB WM 
WGE Center 
Forest Road 
Hancock NH 0344B 

Selectivity and Intermod: 
What Are They? 

A recent letter to the 73 editor com* 
plaining about poor selectivity" when 
using a Kenwood TH-27A HT with en 
outdoor antenna prompted me to think 
about intermod. selectivity and receiv- 
er characteristics in genera!. Let me 
share some of those thoughts with you . 

The reader was picking up pagmg 
services and other transmissions 
which were not on the frequency to 
which he was tuned. He complained 
that his new HT suffered from this prob- 
lem, but his older ICOM lC-2ATdid not. 
Why should newer technology exhibit 
worse behavior? 

The editor explained that such prob- 
lems are in fact worse with the newer, 
wideband receiving rigs, and that it 
was not fair to single Kenwood out He 
was quite correct, but the problem 
goes deeper than could be addressed 
on the letters page. In fact, the letter 
writer was not actually experiencing a 
selectivity problem per se. What he 
had was front-end overload and inter- 
mod. The two are quite different things. 

Selectivity refers to the width and 
shape factor of the receiver's pass- 
band. The two are related concepts; 
the shape factor partly determines the 
overall width. So. the shape factor is 
perhaps the more important spec. The 
term simply refers to how steep the 
filtering curve appears when graphed 
on a dB-versus4requency X-Y plot. If 
the "skirts" or edges of the response 
fall rapidly, then the shape factor is 
steep, meaning that signals outside 
the defined bandwidth will not be 
heard II, however, the skirts fall off in a 
gentle slope, then the effective band- 
width is greater because signals ap- 
pearing on the skins will be passed. 
Obviously, the steeper the skirts, the 
better. 

It is important to note that in today's 
synthesized receivers, essentially all of 
the selectivity is obtained in the IF 
stages. The front ends are usually 
quite broad Let me explain. 

Two Ways to Go 

There are two ways to make a super- 
heterodyne receiver. The old, tried- 
and-true method was to tune the front 
end to the desired signal and then 
greatly increase the selectivity in the IF 
stages This system helps avoid inter- 
ference because the tuned front end 
rejects Signals on distant frequencies, 
but it requires that the local oscillator 
and front-end tuning components track 
each other. In other words, the front 
end must be resonant on the same fre- 
quency as the one which will be passed 
through the IFs after being mixed with 
the focal oscillator! With a mechanical 
tuning arrangement, such as a variable 
capacitor, this is fairly easy to do. 

But with a digital synthesizer, it is not 



as easy. The local oscillator Is con- 
trolled by a phase locked loop system, 
driven from a digital reference. It is 
possible to derive a DC tuning voltage 
in the process (in fact, one is used to 
tune the VCO) and control a varactor 
(voltage-variable capacitor) to track the 
front end, but it becomes impractical 
over wide frequency bands. Thus, for 
many receivers, and especially for 
those which can cover large out-of* 
band frequency ranges, designers 
have turned to another technique. 

Open Wide and Say Ahhhti 

The obvious way to go is simply to 
use an untuned front end! After all. you 
can get all the selectivity you want m 
the IFs. In fact, most of today's walkies 
use this technique. The difference be- 
tween the older units and the newer 
ones is that the old ones only had to 
cover four MHz> so there could be a 
broad bandpass filter ahead of the 
front-end amp. This very coarse tuned 
circuit at least kept the out -of -ft and 
garbage from getting in. Now that we 
all expect our pocket rigs to cover a 40 
to 60 MHz spread, it just isn't practical 
So, there may be no tuning at all. 

So what? Why should this affect the 
operation of the receiver, and why 
does it matter what kind of antenna you 
use? Well P as long as the front-end am* 
plifier stays linear, it doesn't. But, when 
enough signal power {generated by 
multiple transmitters on various fre- 
quencies) gets in, the amp is driven to 
dipping, just like an audio amp is when 
you turn the volume up too loud. At this 
point, the amp becomes a mixer > 0r t if 
you prefer, a modulator; it's the same 
thing, Now, various incoming frequen- 
cies can affect each other, just as if 
they were two inputs to a mixer. This is 
called mtermodulation distortion, or in- 
termod. If the two incoming frequen- 
cies happen to add or subtract to or 
from the one you're tuned to. you will 
hear one or both of them! Also, if they 
mix to one of your IF frequencies! some 
of that resultant signal may leak 
through the first mixer to the IFs, caus- 
ing the same effect. And, of course, 
there can be more than two. Some- 
times, three or four signals can mix and 
cause trouble. Yuck. what a messi 

The reason the antenna matters 
is because it delivers tremendously 
more signal to the receiver than does 
the usual rubber duck. This greatly 
increases the likelihood of overload 
and intermod Walkies are most prone 
to this problem because they are de- 
signed to be very sensitive in order to 
deliver reasonable performance with 
a poor antenna, which a rubber duck 
certainly is. The trade-off is that these 
ultra -sensitive front ends can't take 
too large a signal level before gotng 
into clipping. Also, many of the tuning 
element such as filter coils* which 
can help avoid intermod are just too 
darned big for pocket rigs. Many mo- 
biles, however, have them and con- 
sequently exhibit fewer intermod prob- 
lems. Such rigs usually do not have 



wide, oul-of-band coverage. 

By the way. the difference between a 
receiver's lowest discernible signal 
and its highest level before overload- 
ing is called its dynamic range and is 
expressed in d&. Obviously, the bigger 
the number trie better. Ultimately, the 
dynamic range, selectivity and inter- 
mod rejection matter more than does 
simple sensitivity, especially in FM 
rigs. There usually is plenty of signal to 
work with— you just want to keep all the 
"junk" out of your passbandf 

Use the Right Rig for the Job 

Walkies were never meant to be 
used with base station antennas, and 
most don't even perform well with mo- 
bile antennas, either. You just can't 
have it all in one tiny box! If you live in a 
small town without many radio ser- 
vices, you may have no trouble at all. It. 
however, you live in Boston. Miami or 
some other metropolitan area, good 
luck! t remember using my walkie in the 
car in Miami with a mobile antenna. It 
seemed as if my receiver had very poor 
sensitivity; I was getting into the re- 
peater, but I could barely hear it. Then I 
iried using the rubber duck and T even 
inside the metat car, the repeater came 
in loud and clear, The receiver was be- 
ing blocked by other signals' overload- 
ing the front end. Sometimes I could 
hear them, sometimes I could not. 

There are few base station hgs sold 
anymore, If you are setting up a base, a 
mobile radio with a power supply 
makes a better choice than does a 
walkie. 

TXToo? 

What about transmitters? Can they 
suffer from intermod, too? Yes. they 
sure can! As a matter of fact, repeater 
operators have that problem quite a bit, 
because the repeater is often located 
on top of a hill or tower only a few feet 
away from other higtvpowered trans- 
mitting devices. But with no "front 
end, 1 ' how does a transmitter get inter- 
mod? 

The mixing occurs right in the trans- 
mit final amp! In FM transmitters, the 
final amp is not linear in the first place. 
Typically it is a pulse amp. with the 
pulses being converted to nice clean 
sine waves by the tank circuit (a reso- 
nant coil -cap circuit) and the low-pass 
filters at the output. The inherent non* 
linearity (read "distortion") in these 
amps makes them ripe for intermod 
problems, because they are already 
being driven to dipping by design? So, 
if enough extraneous signal energy 
gets to the amps, It will cause mixing 
and the transmitter will then broadcast 
the intermod far and wide. 

There's an easy way to tell if a re- 
peater's intermod is on its receiver or 
transmitter: It it is still there after the 
receiver's squelch has dropped (but 
before the transmitter shuts down), 
then it is not coming from the receiver' 

It is highly unlikely that you will ever 
generate your own intermod. even if 
you use your walkie as a base station, 
because it takes a substantial amount 
of unwanted signal energy to get past 
the transmitter's output filter and into 
the final amp. Unless you have another 
big transmitter with its antenna very 
close to your walkies. you should be 
clean. 



Are They All the Same? 

I've used a fair number of walkies in 
my day, and 1 do feel that the big 
three" manufacturers have different 
receiver design concepts. In my opin- 
ion (and th i s i s on I y my op i n ion— go to a 
ham club meeting and you'll find peo- 
ple who will disagree), here's how they 
stack up in genera L 

ICO Ms seem to have the best bal- 
ance between sensitivity and selectivi- 
ty, each being a tittle bit less than the 
best available separately from the oth- 
er two. but both being extremely good. 

Yaesus have the best selectivity. If 
you're off 5 kHz. the signal is barely 
hslenabie, and if you're 10 kHz away, it 
is practically gone. However, the rigs 
are not as sensitive as those from the 
other two. There have been some ex- 
ceptions, though, such as the old 
"Memorizer" mobile rig, which was 
about the most sensitive 2 meter radio 
Ive ever seen. 

Ken woods have extremely high sen* 
sitivtty, and it holds up well outside the 
ham bands. The rigs are not terribly 
selective, though; it can be hard to tell 
whether or not you're 5 kHz off* 

As far as intermod rejection Is con- 
cerned, I can't offer any opinion because 
I haven't used the radios enough under 
adverse conditions to make a judg- 
ment. All I can say is this: No matter 
who makes them, walkies do not excel 
in this area. After all. everything has 
limitations, 

Now, let's look at a letter: 

DearKaboom, 

What's the difference between a 
Class A and a Class 8 computer? I 
know it is in regard to the amount ofRFf 
that the computer is allowed lo gener- 
ate* hut what does it actually mean? 
Also, what measures can I take to en- 
sure hash-free computer operation in 
my shack? $ ig n ed , 

Classy 

Dear Classy, 

Contrary to what one might think, a 
Class B computer is "cleaner" than a 
Class A unit, The A designation is for 
computers to be used in a business 
environment only. The RFl specs are 
somewhat looser than those for Class 
B. which is for home use. II is assumed 
that homes and apart mem s will have 
various susceptible devices, like TV 
sets, in close pronimity to the comput- 
er. As long as the machine is in a metal 
box, most of the RFl will exit via the 
cables used to connect the keyboard, 
video monitor, printer, etc. There is no 
way to be sure you won't get any hash 
in your shack, but you can do a few 
things to lessen the severity of the situ- 
ation. Rrst. use shielded cable for ev- 
erything you can. including on the com- 
puter and the rig. Second, ground the 
rig well . Third, try to keep the computer 
as far away as possible. Fourth, wrap 
computer cables through toroids if you 
can. Finally, consider going to a laptop 
if all else fails. These CMOS-based ma- 
chines put out far less hash than the 
tabletop variety because they operate 
on much less power to begin with. By 
the way, some older computers, tike 
my Apple If + . were not even shielded 
at all. Man, they are serious noise gen- 
erators, Hmmm, I wonder if I could put 
a CW key in the micro's reset line and 
have a wideband QRP rig? Only kid- 
ding! 



66 73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 



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73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 67 



Number 24 on your Feedback card 



Looking west 



Bitt Pasternak WA6ITF 
23197 Robin Avenue 
Saugus CA 91350 

W3BE: Radio Amateur of 
the Year 

In case you have not already heard, I 
am honored— proud~~elated— to re- 
port that the Dayton Amateur Radio As- 
sociation has named one of the na- 
tion s best known and most respected 
"amateurs in public service" as the 
1991 Radio Amateur of the Year. The 
person I speak of ts someone whom I 
have been proud to caJi a friend for the 
past decade and a half. That ham and 
friend ts John B. Johnston W3BE of 
Derwood, Maryland and also Of 1919 
M Street N.E.. Washington DC- 
Many of you know W38E as Johnny 
Johnston of the FCC t the Commission 
representative you meet at hamfests 
and conventions across the nation. His 
reserved yet knowledgeable approach 
to discussing matters of regulation has 
made John a friend to many of us, and 
a man who is respected by all. 

Johnston was nominated by a coali* 
(ion of amateurs from across the 
country They felt that his two decades 
of dedication to the regulatory needs 
of the nation's amateurs deserved ma- 
jor recognition. In their letter of nomi- 
nation, they cited John's almost single- 
handed re- write and reorganizaton of 
the Part 97 amateur rules as one of 
his major contributions They noted 
that this was not a task assigned to 
him by his superiors in the Commis- 
sion, but rather done at his own initia- 
tive. He used his unparalleled knowl- 
edge of the amateur service rules to 
address the problems that their am- 
biguities were causing to the amateur 
service, it was also noted that in his 
position as Chief of the FCC's Personal 
Radio Branch, he has always made 
himself available to help members of 
the amateur community to find solu- 
tions to their problems, white also 
working to ensure an appreciation of 
amateur radio within the structure of 
the FCC. 

We have heard more than one per- 
son say that honoring W35E for his 
years of service to the United States 
Amateur Radio Service is long over- 
due, John has become almost insepa- 
rable from the service regulations that 
his hand and mind helped create. Ap- 
parently, the D.A.R.A. Awards Com* 
mitlee heard the same call lo honor 
him and his work, ll is my opinion that 
John B. Johnston W33E is the best 
friend we amateurs have in the ranks of 
the FCC. 

220 Gone 

John Johnston W3BE being named 
Radio Amateur of the Year was the 
good news this spring. Now here is the 
bad. John's superiors at the FCC— the 
Commissioners— say that hams will 



have to be off of the 220 to 222 MHz 
band by midsummer. White no exact 
date can be given, amateurs will have 
to vacate the band entirely 90 days af- 
ter the effective date of the rules 
change, adopted on Thursday, March 
1 4 , th at tak es h am s off the lo we r pa rt ot 
the 1-1/4 meter band and puts com- 
mercial services on. The IMPRM was 
adopted pretty much as proposed, with 
the addition of a reserve of some chan- 
nels for public safety use. Automatic 
vehicle monitoring will probably be 
available through the entire band. 

The FCC rejected the ARRUs re- 
quest for secondary access to 220-222 
MHz. The American Red Cross lost in 
its request for special frequencies, as 
did Electronic Tracking Systems. Inc., 
for police tracking units. And regarding 
PELTS, the Persona! Emergency Lo- 
cator Transmitter System, no decision 
was made, [For mom information on 
PELTS, see the Nov. '90 -Homing in" 
column.] Some hams say they won't 
leave the band. They believe that the 
FCC won't enforce the new rules, if 
these hams insist on staying, they may 
have to put their licenses, wallets, and 
possibly their personal freedom on the 
line. Isn't it time to let the matter stand? 
It was a good Tight, but we lost! 

13cm Offered to Business 

Mmd you. I am writing this column on 
April 1. I wish I could say, "April 
Fooist" but alas, I cant. And. as if the 
toss of 220-222 MHz was not a bad 
enough way to enter the spring sea- 
son, now the 13cm amateur band ap- 
pears to be up for grabs. In fact, it may 
be given away by the FCC at next 
year's World Administrative Radio 
Conference fWARC '92). The Commis- 
sion is proposing that it be turned over 
to commercial use for digital audio 
broadcasting and satellite uplinks for 
worldwide mobile services. 

Specifically, the FCC suggests that 
2360-2410 MHz— including the 2360- 
2390 MHz slice of spectrum now off- 
limits to amateurs — be given to the 
satellite-based Digital Audio Service, 
and 2410*2450 MHz become an uplink 
band for mobile satellite services. This 
would leave hams with only 2300-2310 
MHz, and this only on a secondary, 
totally no nin tendering basis to any and 
all other users who might receive as- 
signment at a later date. The FCC also 
proposes that hams be granted some 
limited, non interfering access to the 
entire band. The key word appears io 
be "nohinlerfereing/* which could 
mean anything to anybody, since no 
designator for what constitutes inter- 
ference" has ever been determined for 
blanket application across the entire 
electromagnetic spectrum. 

The proposal to reallocate 13cm ts a 
part of the overall United Stale's posi- 
tion paper Tor next year's World Ad- 
ministrative Radio Conference. It 
should be noted that most countries In 



the world, especially the emerging 
third world countries, are aJ ready set 
against the Amateur Radio Service 
retaining its 20 and 40 meter bands. 
The FCC's offering the 13cm band 
up tor grabs Only strengthens the posi- 
tion of those seeking to gut amateur 
operations in all spectrum from DC 
to light. 

Michigan— "Privating Our OK 

Let's close with these two items 
about FM and repeaters, Ever hear the 
term "privating out"? in the world of 
FM and repeaters, it means that a re- 
peater owner has decided that he no 
longer wants the general amateur com- 
munity to have access to his machine. 
So. he puts the word out that, as of a 
specified date, the repeater will only be 
available to selected users of his 
choice. In effect, he has evicted the 
overall amateur community. He has 
taken an "open" repeater and has 
"pnvaled out," 

Michigan has a long tradition of op- 
posing any dosed or private repeater 
operation. Now it will not only permit 
the establishment of closed and pri- 
vate repeaters, il will also permit exist* 
ing systems to go private if they so 
choose. The Michigan Area Repeater 
Council made this new stand public in 
its February newsletter. 

The question of whether or not to 
permit private repeater operation in 
this state came to a head several 
months ago. As noted, Michigan tradi- 
tionally banned closed and private 
systems. Then, last fall several re- 
peater trustees informed the council 
that they were changing to closed op- 
eration. Another refused to give the 



council some key system access infor- 
mation for its records. They decided it 
was time to discuss the prwating-out 
issue. 

In the discussion, which took place 
last December 1990. the Michigan 
Area Repealer Council determined 
that the issue of private versus open 
operation is strictly the province ot the 
repeater owner, and not the business 
of the coordinating body. 

However, the council also demand* 
ed that no matter which type of opera- 
tion a repeater owner chooses, he 
must supply all data needed for the 
coordination body's technical data- 
base. The lack of this information, the 
Michigan Area Repeater Council says, 
will seriously detract from that organi- 
zation's ability to coordinate spectrum 
usage. 

The Big MACC 

We can at least eryd with a story that 
reads like an April fools joke, even 
though every word is true. Can you be- 
lieve that a hungry "Big MACC* has 
eaten two more states? In this case, 
the Big MACC we are talking about is 
the giant Mid America Coordination 
Council. 

Late word is that the Big MACC has 
become even larger, bringing Ohio and 
Indiana under its umbrella. This makes 
1 3 the total number of states represent- 
ed by the MACC. It also makes the Big 
MACC the largest coordination council 
in the United States, and the largest 
political representative of FM and re- 
peater interests in the world. In matters 
of repeater coord mat ion policy, it is 
probably more political iy powerful than 
the ARRL! 



Upda 



Number 25 on your Feedback card 




ROBO-COPy 

See the above article in the Oct. 
'90 issue, page 20. Important: See at- 
so the update m the Dec. '90 issue. 
Mike Hansen WB9D Yl, the author, has 
sent us the latest revision of R06O- 
COPy T version 3. They are currently 
listed on the 73 BBS (in the 73Mag SIG) 
at (603) 525-4438. The file named 
robo3l.exe is for COM1, and the file 
named robo32.exe is for COM2. 

WB9DYI: "ROBO-COPy version 3 
uses Ihe RHn put of the COM port, and 
is thus completely compatible with the 
interface circuitry of the robo2.exe 
{The correct pin number tor Rl on the 
DB-25 connector is 22.) 

"Version 3 is different from version 2 
in two areas: 

"1 , A fix was installed tn the routine 
that prevents the average from being 
skewed by a large number of repetitive 
ditsordahs. 

"£ A correction factor was added 
into Ihe the word-pewninute calcu- 
lation to compensate lor the different 
sampling filter settings. This yields 
more accurate wpm readings at the 



HI filter setting. Note that the wpm cal- 
culation is based strictly on the speed 
of the incoming dits and dahs. and 
does not actually count the number ot 
"words" sent over a 60-second period, 
tike an FCC code exam. On-the-air 
tests using W1AW show the new at- 
gonthm to be accurate 10 plus or minus 
3 wpm. 

"Note: Early models of the Tandy 
1000 series of PCs do not have truly 
compatible COM port BIOS routines. 
They lock up when attempting to run 
ROBO-COPy. 

"Well over 100 hams have contact- 
ed me about ROBO-COPy. I appre- 
ciate any feedback or recommend- 
ations. Please contact me via the 
73 BBS under "men" or by mail at 
1405 Tangle Wood Dr.. Algonquin IL 
60102,'" 



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Call: 

1-800-289-0388 



68 73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 



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73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 69 






Number 26 on your Feedback card 




Mike Bryce WB&VGE 
2225 Mayflower NW 
Massilton OH 44646 

Field Day Success 

With the June flowers, comes Field 
Day: both a contest and an emergency 
communication exercise many hams 
enjoy. Plans for a winning Field Day 
are developed all year long. The aver* 
age QRPer can make a good showing 
when operating Field Day, and have a 
lot of fun to boot! 

There are two things you must have 
to complete a successful Field Day op- 
eration: power and antennas. Last year 
I operated the full 24 hours of Field Day 
with a 6 amp/hour gel celi battery. A 
small Arco GP 100 solar panel kept the 
battery charged There was no need to 
have a charge controller connected to 
the battery, as a constant load was 
maintained by the Argonaut. The pri- 
mary mode was CW with a dash of 
SSB thrown in. While I didn't generate 
an earth-shaking score, I worked just 
about everyone I could hear. 

The Expanded Voltmeter 

I brought along with me a simple and 
very handy piece of test equipment: an 
expanded voltmeter A dedicated 
state-of -charge meter for lead- acid and 
NiCd batteries can be built very easily 
with four basic components: a zener 
diode, a resistor, a potentiometer, and 
a 0-1 mA meter. This hand- held volt- 
meter wilt allow you to keep (rack of 
battery voltage without guessing, Of 
course, you could use one of the many 
inexpensive digital meters on the mar- 
ket, but this device is simple and costs 
very little to burld. If you step on it and 
break it, you're not out a lot of money. 

H era's how it works. The voltage 
across the zener diode is essentially 
constant with respect to the current 
passing through the zener. If the bat* 
tery voltage moves around, which it will 
(that's why we are doing this in the first 
place}, the zener voltage will remain 
fixed at 10 VDC The design concept is 
to use a meter to measure the differ* 
ence between the fixed zener voltage 
and the battery's positive terminal. 

Because the really important volt- 
ages are between 10 and IS VDC, 
that's what we'll measure. Since a fully 
charged lead-acid battery is nearly 15 




Figure. Make art expanded voltmeter 
for Field Day, 



Low Power Operation 

VDC (in most cases , the voltage of a 
fully charged gel cell battery is 14.4 
voHs under charge) the meter will then 
need to cover a range of 0-5 volts, 
since we are referencing against the 
zener diode voltage. 

Easy to Build 

Construction is. by design, simple. 
Only four components are needed 
You'll need a 0-1 mA meter, a zener 
diode, a resistor, and a trimmer pot. 
Check the parts list on the schematic. 
A suitable meter is available from Ra- 
dio Shack The meter, as ri comes from 
the package, is a basic 0-1 mA meter. 

Remember, you don't have to use 
(he meter from Radio Shack, Any 0-1 
mA meter will work. I've used 0-50 mi- 
croammeters and they've worked fine. 
I've even used old surplus 270 deg me- 
ters without trouble. Use what you 
havel If you want to use the Radio 
Shack meter, its catalog number is RS 
270-1754. 

In fact you can get all the parts 
needed for this project from Radio 
Shack, with the exception of the 10 volt 
zener diode. I have a stock of these 
here in my junk bo*. If you can't find the 
zener diode called for. drop me a letter. 
Tit send one off to you for the price of 
two first class postage stamps. One for 
the diode, the other for the return 
postage. 

Conversion of the meter is a simple 
matter of adding the extra components 
to a small piece of perf -board and 
changing the face of the meter. Since 
the meter's face already says 'DC 
Volts/' all we have to do is change the 
scale. You'll need a pair of steady 
hands, some small screwdrivers, and a 
dab of White Out™. A sheet of press-on 
letters will be needed to re-mark the 
meter's face. Of course, you could al- 
ways re-mark the meter's face with a 
pencil or pen Joo, 

Place a soft doth on your work area 
to prevent the meter's clear plastic 
face from being scratched. To remove 
the plastic face, hold the bottom of the 
meter in one hand, and pop the face off 
with the other hand. You'll find two 
parts to the meter's plastic face, the 
face ft self and the black shield. Lay 
these aside. 

Notice the two Philtips screws hold- 
ing the scale to the body. With a small 
jeweler's screwdriver, carefully re- 
move one screw. Be sure you don't 
drop the screw into the meter's hair 
spring or moving coil. Remove the oth- 
er screw, Now, don't lift the metal scale 
off; rather, slide it off. Replace the two 
plastic pans and set the meter aside. 
This will protect the fragile needle and 
hair spring. 

Lay the meter face down on a hard 
surface. You don't want to bend the 
metal plate, Since one end of the me- 
ter s scale is already marked 15 volts, 
you only have to change the zero at the 




Photo A, The completed, expanded voltmeter keeps an eye on the battery. 



other end to a 10. Use the White Out 
and cover the un needed scale num- 
bers. After the White Out has dried, 
use a press-on number to re-mark the 
scale, from 10 volts where the zero 
used to be, to 15 volts on the high end. 
The middle Of the scale is 12.5 volts. 

As a thought, some colored high- 
lighters could be used to mark the 
scale in yellow, red, and green. If you 
don't want to go to all this trouble, 
use a pencil and remark the scale 
by hand. The first method is much 
more professional looking, though. 
Reassemble the meter and put it 
aside for mounting in an appropriate 
cabinet. A Radio Shack plastic project 
box works quite well. I used a Radio 
Shack #270-233. 

The actual circuit may be assembled 
on pert-board or a simple PC board. 
Hard wiring may also be used, I as- 
sembled the circuit and used a piece 
of double-sided lape to hold the 
board to the inside of the plastic box 
holding the meter. Several feet of test 
lead wire and clip leads finish up the 
construction. A rubber grommet pro- 
tects the wires from chaffing on the 
plastic box. 

Calibration 

To calibrate the meter, you'll need 
a variable power supply and a digital 
voltmeter. Using the digital voltme- 
ter, set the power supply to read 15 
volts, and adjust the 10k trimmer for 
a reading of 15 volts on the expand- 
ed meter. Change the voltage to 12.5 
volts and note the reading. It should be 



in the middle of the scale That's all 
there is to it 

Because of the tolerance of the 
analog meter and the zener diode, ihe 
expanded voltmeter may not track 100 
percent with the digital voltmeter. 
Since we're interested in the range 
from 12 to 14 vofls, adjust the trimmer 
for the most accurate reading between 
these two points. The expanded volt- 
meter will be accurate to within 0.1 volt. 
Button everything up and start using 
your expanded voltmeter. 

Just one word of caution when using 
the meter: Don't measure the voltage 
at the load unless that is where you 
want to see the real voltage to the 
device. If you connect the voltmeter to 
the load, you'll see the voltage drop 
from the battery to the load. 

The best place to put the voltmeter is 
right at the battery, not the load. You 
can use this to your advantage, howev- 
er. If you measure 12.5 volts at the 
battery, and then only 11 at the load, 
you*ve got some serious trouble in your 
power connections. An easy fix is in- 
creasing the wire size between the 
load and the battery. 

By using this expanded voltmeter on 
your battery-powered equipment, 
you f H always know their condition. This 
may keep your signals from chirping 
away on CW or FMing on SSB. You 
don't want to be known for a nasty sig- 
nal in this year's Field Day. 

The expanded voltmeter will be a 
welcome addition to your Field Day's 
war chest, right beside your death ray 
antenna. 




Photo B. Inside the expanded voltmeter Only three components needed! 



70 73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 



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J3 Amateur 
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R.SJ page 

109 AAA Engineering 51 

164 Ac* Communications ollndtanapofcs 63 



83 



Ace Systems . . 

• Advanced Electron*: Applications 

• Advanced Electronic Applications 
126 Aero Dai a Systems 
253 AM>ama Amateur Electronics . .. 

67 Almco Electronics 

194 AH Electronics Corporailon _ T .. 

291 All band Radio . . 

• Amateur Electronics Supply 
» Amplre, Inc. ... 

135 Antennas West 

236 Antennas West 

296 Antennas West 

99 Antennas West 

107 Antennas West 

5 Antennas West 

90 Antennas West 

276 Artacl 

• Associated Radio 
16 Aetron Corporation , 

243 AXM. tnc 

289 Aztech, Inc. . 

21 B ft B, tnc . 

53 Barker A Williamson 

41 Barry Elect ronics Corporation 

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197 Bf amsTorm Engineering 

64 Broadcast Technical Service 
166 Buck master Publishing 
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170 Buckmasier Publishing .55" 

56 Buckmasier Publishing 71 * 

184 CASSales, Inc 17 

116 CAT S 79 



55 

15* 
13" 

64 

81 

27* 

,. 45 

.. 67 

39- 

81 
, 17 

79 

32 

71 
79 
64 

.. 55 
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.. 43 

81 



17 
69 
21 
60 
32 
67 
16* 
17* 



R.S.I page 

277 Cable Network 71 

251 CaWe K perts .84 

■ CS City International 56 

♦ Cellular Security Group , . 63 

265 Chipswrtch 71 

* Cleveland Institute o* Electronics 7? 
1S6 Coaxial Dynamics 16 
1 56 Commpute Corporation . . 67 

99 Communication Concepts, Inc 49 

10 Communication Specialist 41 * 

121 Communications Electronic ..... 23 
t5 Comielco 61 

12 Connect Systems . 1 
146 Creative Control Products 71 

256 Delia Research 49 

257 Detta Research 71 

13 OoppiecSysiems 67 

114 EH. Yost 63 

294 Eavesdropping Detection 64 

185 Electronic Engineering , 79 

8 Elktronlcs ,, 51 

• Engineering Consul ling 64 

280 Excellem Technology 79 

75 Fair Radio Sales 81 

169 G & G Electronics 64 

60 Gardei Electronics 79 

193 GGTE 6T 

262 Gieht Electronics 60 

17 GLB Electronics 76 

72 Glen Martin Engineering 61 

1 92 Grapevine Group ..... 79 

* Ham Radio Toy Store 63 

57 Hamtrontcs, Inc 30 

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293 Innoteck. Inc 32 



R.SJ 

100 Interconnect Speciafisis, Inc. 
77 Interflow Systems . 

270 J-Com 

• Japan Radio 

• Jo Gunn Enterprises 

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• Kenwood USA Corporation 

61 Kuby Kommunications ,,-*•• 

234 Lent lm Communications 

47 Ltnk-Com — 

267 M2 Enterprises 

• Maggtore Electronics Lab 

101 Maxcom. Inc 

44 Metro Printing 

66 MFJ Enterprises 

162 Michigan Radio 

160 Mkrro Computer Concepts 

144 Micro Control Specialities 

297 Ming Products ............ 

231 Mirage/KLM 

114 Mr, Nicad . , 

268 N4EDQ 

54 NCG 

• Omar Electronics . 

• P. C. Electronics 

170 Pacific Cable Company J nc . 

264 Palomar Telecom 

286 Performance Electronics 

66 Periphe* . . . . 
249 Phrllips-Tech 

256 Polyphaser 

132 Ouemeni Electronics 

290 R2 Electronics ............. 

3! Radio Amateur Callbook 

76 Radio Engineers . . 

34 Ramsey Electronics 



page R.S.# 



77 

61 

.... 4 
25 
71 

60 

5.6.CV4 

55 

, . . . . 69 

57 
....32' 
, . . . , 63 

9 

16 
56 



■ ■ . ■ tv 
83 

A3 

., 49,51 
.... SO 
78.84* 
.. 63 

79 

..... 69 
47 

79 

52 

75,76 

.....60 

. b r . r 63 

80 

.... 19* 



.-....-.*.. 



1 71 RF Enterprises 
264 Ross Distributing 

71 Rutland Arrays 
153 SaiefiiteOty 

36 Scrambling News 

95 Sensible Solutions 
168 SOC.Enc 
188 SGC.Inc 

• Smith Design 
250 Software Systems 
244 Software Systems 
193 Spectrum International 
247 Startek 

87 TCELabe ............ 

124 Texas Bug Catcher Antenna 

• The Ham Center 
150 The Radio Works 
115 The RF Connection 

62 TNR. 

299 Townwnd Electron lea 

• Uncle Wayne ' s Books ha 1 1 

• Universal Radio . 
120 VanGorden Engineering . 
104 Van triers line "t Sons, Inc. 

79 Vanguard Labs . . . 
269 Versatel Communications 

• VHF Communications . . 

261 Visual Concepts 

191 W&W Associates 

36 W9tNN Antennas 
292 Walker Scientificjnc 
20 Wolfe Communications 



page 

.... 35 

... 79 

69 

. 36* 



■ **>*«■. 



«■■•■ + ■ "i***- 



*M^1^**■i^1 



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63 

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57 
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.. 59 
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79 
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- 939 

.. 77 

- 67 



Bold Hitlngt art ?3'm n«w idverila*ni Ihli month. 

* Advertisers who have contributed to tti# National 
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72 73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 



Never Say Die 



Continued from page 4 
want to spring for the 12-second 4.5 
kHz passband chips. Jus! what you 
need to make that 2" speaker sound 
good when you talk with someone. 

If your message is longer than 20 
seconds the chips work just fine in se- 
ries. Talk as long as you like 

These are being made by Informa- 
tion Storage Devices of San Jose and 
samples are already being shipped. 
(See the "New Products" section of 
73, May 1991.) 

Just think of now much time you'll 
save by being able to read Z3while in a 
QSO and only having to speak the oth- 
er chap's caJI and name one time! Or 
play Nintendo, watch a ball game on 
TV. or whatever you do to f niter away 
your life. 

What about the other chaps trans- 
missions? Don't you have to waste 
time listening to them? Nah, jusl pro- 
gram in a cheery, 'Okay on everything 
OM." and forget it. He's probably us- 
ing a QSO machine too, right? 

Think of how much aggravation you 
can save during contests by using one 
chip tocaJt h "CQ contest" and another 
to give your com est number, automati- 
cally incremented. Chip 1: "XZ2AB-" 
Chip 2 'This is W2NSD portable 1 in 
Mew Hampshire. QSL. Your number is 
five nine," Chip 3; "One si* seven" 
(this one increments to give the three 
numbers in sequence). Back to chip 2: 
"Isthataroger? 1 * 

A sharp contest operator should be 
able to keep at least two rigs going 
simultaneously, one on each end of the 
band, thus doubling his score I'd ar- 
range for a cassette recording of all 
contacts so i wouldn't even have to log 
the received contest numbers until 
later. 

Let's get cracking on some QSO ma- 
chine designs. The winners will get 
their circuits pub N shed in 73 and prob- 
ably find ten new companies (and five 
old ones) offering royalties to manufac- 
ture I heir invention. Put me down for 
10% of your royalty or I'll sue. 

Now, for those of you whose sen se of 
humor rotted off years ago or was de- 
stroyed during puberty, while the chips 
are real and the applications will work, 
I'm not serious about suggesting total- 
ly automatic contacts. 

For those of you who think I surely 
must be kidding, just wait until you see 
some QSO machine articles. And for 
those of you who are confused and 
aren't sure whether Vm serious or not 
well, golly, me either. Now get started 
chipping away so I can fill my log and 
write editorials at the same time. 

You can call Jim Oliphant N60BM at 
(800) 825-4473 for more info on the 
ISD chips. Tell him Wayne sent you. 

Crowded Two 

I have a message for you to pass 
aiong, if you will. If you dare? I happen 
to think you are too chicken to speak 
up. Well, I'm not. 

The next time you hear some old ad- 
dle-brained idiot grousing that the no- 
coders shouldn't be allowed on two 
meters because the band is already 



crowded enough, please break in and 
tell him that Wayne has a message for 
him: He's a foolish fossil and should 
apoJy immediately for his Silent Key 
certificate for the brain-dead. 

Two meters crowded? In what uni- 
verse is that? Sure, maybe in Tokyo, 
where they have about five times as 
many hams as we do, Don't tell me 
about crowding; I get around too much 
and I listen. In (he last year I have 
called m on every repeater I could 
reach while visiting Los Angeles, Den- 
ver, Las Vegas, Chicago, New York, 
Dallas, Nash vine, Minneapolis. Boston, 
Kansas City, Dayton, Cofumbus, Mo- 
bile, New Orleans, San Diego, Pod- 
land (ME}, Troy (NY), and a few more 
cities. Oh, I've made a few QSOs, but 
99% of the time all I get is a kerchunk 
and silence. Not only am the repeaters 
not *n use, no one is even listening to 
them. 

Oh sure, every repeater channel is 
occupied, I can often raise a dozen or 



people in other countries Even tourists 
rarely get to talk to more than hotel 
employees or waiters. We have an 
enormous toot for helping the world to 
change, but we've been trashing it with 
idiocies such as the DXCC award. 

We also have 1 25,000 Techs self-im* 
prisoned up on 2m, where they can't 
talk much further than they can see, 
The world will get no help from them, 
It's a pity that in a time when people-to- 
people com mum cat tons are so desper- 
ately needed, that so many of us ere 
handcuffed to the VHP bands, impris* 
oned mainly by a terror of the code. 

I've tried to push Techs to get their 
General licenses before. A few have 
reacted intelligently, but many have 
gotten angry. That damned Wayne 
Green! It's this sort of reaction which 
has probably prevented any other ham 
rags from even trying to write about 
such a delicate subject. 

So okay, get mad at me. it thai 
makes you feel any better. Bui the 







QSL of the Month To enter your QSU mail it in an envelope to 73 , WGE Center, 
Forest Road, Hancock, NH 03449. Attn: QSL of the Month. Winners receive a 
one-year Subscription (or extension) to 73. Entries not in envelopes cannot be 
accepted. 



more repeaters. There just isn't any- 
one listening to them. So tell me alt 
about how crowded two meters is and 
I'll tell you you're full of . . ,er 
baloney. From what I've experienced 
m every part of the country we could 
handle ten limes as much activity on 
2m without causing any problems, 

I realize there's no way to get through 
the ceramic minds involved. They've 
never let facts or reason even remotely 
influence their strongly held, frequent- 
fy expressed beliefs. These tend to be 
the same fuddy-duddies we hear 
sounding off about Jews, blacks, Japs, 
homos, wetbacks and so on. 

There's nothing new about hatred 
and intolerance, Alas, i don't see any 
signs of the human race improving In 
this respect. No learning curve here. 
We see groups all around the world 
anxious to kill other groups for reli- 
gious, racial or tribal reasons. 

Unless you're marned to them, you 
generally have to not know someone in 
order to hate them enough to want to 
kill them. Communications can make a 
big difference. . even in marriage, 
where it's rarer even Irian on 2m, 

Amateur radio Is about the only 
medium where people can talk with 



worst part of that is that you know I'm 
right. Your only out is to get even mad- 
der. Your alternative is to admit that, 
yes, t'm right and you have been taking 
the easy way out. Yes, it takes some 
work to get a higher license is work 
really that awful 7 

Techs and Novices, we neerS you 
down there on 1 5m and 20m. We need 
you there badly. The chaps who are 
there have made such a mess of those 
bands that they're like inner city slums. 
You're going to be absolutely disgust- 
ed when you hear how bad it is. You'll 
hear Extra Class hams chasing DX 
hams off the air any time they surface. 
You'll hear these roving gangs of ter- 
rorists assaulting rare DX with merci- 
less pi letups until they are battered and 
bruised and give up. 

They don't have the slightest interest 
in talking with the chap in some rare 
country. All they want is a QSL card 
and l hey don't care what it takes to gel 
it \*m old enough to remember when 
"green OSLs" were dollar bills. Now 
they're $20 bills. 

A few DX hams have gotten addicted 
to our green QSLs and it keeps 'em 
going, despite the treatment they get. M 
the value of the dollar keeps dropping. 



they're going to start demanding pic- 
tures Of Grants tomb instead of the 
Bush homestead. 

We desperately need you Techs 
down there to introduce a whole new 
concept to amateur radio act uaMy talk- 
ing with people in oiher countries Mak- 
ing friends . not just for yourself, but 
for America too. 

There's a destructive phenomenon 
that takes place when two groups (or 
even people tike husbands and wives) 
are not in good communication with 
each other. I've never seen anyone 
else write about this, but I've seen B in 
action and it's a corker. 

When communication is limited be* 
tween two groups, what communica- 
tion there is tends to get blown all out of 
proportion Paranoia sets in. 

Techs, we need you 10 get oft 2m, at 
least pan of the time, and Stan talking 
with hams in France. Germany, Hun- 
gary. Estonia and so on. We need to let 
them know that we re interested in 
them in what they do, what interests 
they have, what problems, what sue* 
cesses. Have they any questions about 
what America is really like? What's 
their perspective on the EC? What do 
they think about Bush G or by and Sad* 
dam? What ethnic problems do they 
have to cope with? 

Look around for some African sta- 
tions and start finding out how it is to 
live in Kenya these days. Uganda. 
Have you ever actually talked with a 
South African about what's going on 
down there? You'll find a completely 
different perspective from anything 
you've read in the papers or heard on 
PBS, I guarantee. 

We need you to get down on our DX 
bands and start cleaning 'em up, Don't 
succumb to the DXing craze. Let's get 
together and force OSTto isolate the 
OXers' band pollution they foment just 
to DX contests. 

Now, am I bad-writing the League? 
If you call a constructive plan to help 
our hobby and our country bad. I 
suppose so. Lefs see some Techs with 
guts getting their local clubs to start 
General study classes and moving 
cleanup squads into 20m. It wouldn't 
hurt to start at the top of 20m and dean 
up the awful messes on 14.313 and 
14.275. Then get up some steam and 
charge down the band, leveling those 
rotten pile-ups as you go Take no pris- 
oners. 

. . deW2NSD/i 

Golly. I almost missed our sked I 
was busy sending some comments to 
the Candy Company on a recent peti- 
tion intended to help solve the packet 
brouhaha. You know p where some Idiol 
put a message into a packet system 
asking people to call a 900-number 
about some sort of stopping the war 
political baloney 

Sure enough, some ham got a wild 
hair and complained to the FCC, an 
action which should be punishable by 
death or worse, and the next thing you 
know official harassment was the order 
of the day. The foolish ham who started 
the chain reaction with his dumb mes- 
sage brought all the innocent relayers 






73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 73 



whose stations automatically passed 
along the packet into the soup. 

What should have happened «s that 
when someone noticed the dumb mes- 
sage they should have let the originator 
know what they thought of him screw* 
ing up like that. When we ask the FCC 
to solve problems for us they almost 
invariably do it with an atom bomb, 
leaving us in shock and having to fight 
the fallout for years afterward. 

Anyway, in case you're interested in 
my comments, here"s what I wrote. \t 
not. pour yourself a cuppa coffee and 
skip it. 

Tom Blackwell N5GAR and Joe Jar- 
rett K5FOG petitioned the FCC to put 
the responsibility for an "illegal" mes- 
sage on the originator. 

SecmtaryFCC 
Washington DC205S4 

Re: RM-7649— Amending the repeater 
rules 

Yo t Commissioners: 

The amateur radio service can bene- 
fit our country only if it is permitted to 
deveiop new technologies with a mini* 
mum of interference. Indeed* amateur 
radio can be an enormously valuable 
resource 

It's well known that most scientific 
breakthroughs have been made by 
amateurs. Professionals normally 
can Y afford to spend the time and mon- 
ey it takes to pursue technologies that 
have only a slight chance at success. 
Amateurs can. Most taiL but the few 
who succeed are worth ail the failures 
and more. 

Radio amateurs developed most Of 
our present communications modes. 
Jack Babkes W2GDG developed and 
pioneered narrowband FM back in 
194$. That's the primary communica- 
tions mode for mobile VHF and UHF 
today, I was one of his helpers in this 
project. 

The first practical single sideband 
communications system was devel- 
oped and pioneered by an amateur 
{Don Noregaard) . . as was slow-scan 
TV (Copthome McDonald). WBJK in- 
vented the helical antenna. W1FZJ in- 
vented the practical parametric ampli- 
fier {on 6m} and t published the first 
articles on this discovery in 73. 

Today s cellular teiephone system 
would be unlikely it the technology 
hadn 7 been developed by amateurs in 
Chicago i published the circuits for 
this system almost 20 years ago. Ama- 
teurs were the driving force that got 
microcomputers going. Today ama- 
teurs are developing packet communi- 
cations systems. They need alt the lati- 
tude possible to develop and pioneer 
this new system. 

When the FCC formed the Long 
Range Planning Committee {LRPCj. 
the group quickly decided that the only 
dependable emergency communica* 
tions system we have in America is am- 
ateur radio. Since the high speed auto- 
matic relaying feature of packet radio is 
a key element in building emergency 
networks, the current FCC decision to 
block this is harmful to both the devel- 



opment of packet technology and to 
the long range interests of America. 1 
was a member of the LRPC from its 
founding. 

The rule change proposed in RM- 
7649 provides a simple solution to the 
problem that the FCC has caused, t 
recommend it be accepted until even 
less restrictive rules can be devised. 

Amateur radio needs less rules and 
more latitude, not federal harassment 
Technology is the key to the future, so 
the FCC should be working with the 
amateur radio industry to devise ways 
to increase the number ot youngsters 
attracted to the hobby f not closing off 
experimental areas from development. 
Sincerely, Wayne Green W2NSD/1 

Naturally the Commissioners didn't 
allow enough time {a crummy 30 days 
from March 6th) for us to get the word 
out and get enough comments on this 
sore subject to have some weight. 

Some Progress 

The big problem we have in amateur 
radio today Isn't the new no-code 
Techs, it's the old-timers who have 
their heels dug in and are fighting pro- 
gress. The new Techs are getting high 
marks from every comer 

While I want to thank the many read- 
ers who've been crediting me with get- 
ting the no-code license accepted, I 
don't teal that a 33-year fight finally 
won is much to crow about. If we'd 
gone this route 30 years ago when I 
started pushing for it> I believe we 
could well have five million hams today 
instead of under a half million and that 
the US might still have a consumer 
electronics industry. 

I've recently been talking with some 
of the microcomputer pioneers, If 
you've got some old issues of Micro- 
computing or SO Micro , you can look 
back and see where, if Radio Shack 
had followed my urging, the whole 
world today might welt be TRS-OOS 
instead of MS-DOS, and Radio Shack 
would probably be around S50 billion 
ahead of where they are now. 

If Texas Instruments had paid atten- 
tion, instead of dropping $635 million 
on their Tt-44/A computer, they could 
have par la yed it. into a S10 biMion a year 
new business, 

So many might-have-beens! With 
Sony now looking to acquire Apple , H 
only Jobs hadn't beaten Wozniak with 
his Lisa vs. Apple II bailie we'd be way 
ahead of the present 80486 technolo- 
gy and Jobs would be on top in- 
stead of a loser with his NeXT . . . and 
the Woz back teaching for a living. 

Sigh, back to the present, our next 
goal is to not just welcome our new 
Techs, but to get hundreds ot thou- 
sands of 'em in and on the ladder to 
General If you hear any old-timers 
grousing, throw a pail of ice water on 
'em and get em to cool that crapoia. 
Tell "em to get an enema and get 
aboard the world of the '90s 

We need to bring in a few million 
young hams. We need to get cracking 
on narrowband technologies, We need 
to go digital. There's plenty to do to 
clean up the mess we've made. We 



need less baloney on the bands. We 
need to get nd of pite-ups and other 
such intentional interference, We need 
several thousand new ham dubs. We 
need to encourage every active ham to 
spend at least an hour a week learning 
more about technology. Clubs can 
help here, Tech sessions over re- 
peaters will help. Our new Radio Fun 
should help a lot. 

Were beginning to make some pro- 
gress. The VEC system I began push* 
ing over 20 years ago got accepted and 
is working weH Ditto the repeater regs I 
urged at most 20 years ago, These 
were all fought tooth and nail by the 
ARRL, as were the RTTY regs I started 
pushing in 1951 with my first publica- 
tion, Amateur Radio Frontiers. The 
League finally lost, as they always do, 
but only after having wasted years of 
our time 

Never mind my grousing about the 
League and their eternal politics. Their 
eye is on the money and that means 
the millions they make from ads in 
QST. My goals have always been to 
get things done, . .but not to lose 
enough money in the process to put me 
out of business. 

I'm having fun today with my new 
recording studio. I'm working on some 
poetry CDs, some children's books 
on CD, promoting prerecorded DAT 
tapes, independent label distribution, 
and at least a half dozen new publica- 
tions. 

When I was young I loved to read the 
Oz books and the Ernest Thompson 
Seton wildlife books I don'1 know if 
kids today will enjoy them as much as I 
did. but Tm going to read 'em and put 
'em on CDs and see what can be done 
And there's a bunch of fantastic poems 
by an old friend Of mine that should be 
read and put out on CDs too. 

Tin disappointed that in my 40 years 
of publishing ham magazines I haven't 
come across anyone who's been able 
to capture the excitement of our hobby 
in poetry I guess we're too left brained 
to be artistic, eh? Yet we have Jean 
Shepherd K20RS and his marvelous 
stones, so we're not all nuts, bolts and 
ICs. 

Is there anything in our rules which 
says that our OSOs have to be boring 
and repetitious? 1 know our regs pretty 
well and I don't recall anything that pro- 
hibits us from being entertaining dur- 
ing a contact. 

How many contacts have you had 
where someone read you a story or a 
poem? Has anyone even read you an 
interesting article? Even out of a ham 
magazine? Maybe we can break our 
70-year-old pattern and start a new 
generation of hams who use our magi- 
cal medium to actually communicate. 
Sigh, I suppose that's too much of a 
change to ask. Perhaps, in 30 years, if 
we've still got any frequencies, and 
long after I'm gone, perhaps we'll have 
a generation of amateurs who finally 
understand the concept of communi- 
cations. 

Exchanging trivia. . .even less than 
one would get at a cocktail party. . . 
isn't communicating. Sure, it's difficult 
to get into a deep conversation with 



someone you've never talked with be- 
fore. But you're doing it with hams 
you've been talking with for years. 

I'm finally beginning to get letters 
telling me about the most exciting 
times some of you have had in amateur 
radio. Great stuff I I'd love to hear from 
more of you. I really don't care what rig 
or antenna you're using as long as \ 
can hear you. I want to talk with you! I 
want to know what you particularly en- 
joy about amateur radio. I want to know 
what other things you enjoy* if there are 
any, Heck + even if you enjoy sitting 
down lo watch TTre Simpsons with a 
brew, at least you'll be telling me about 
yourself. Yes, I enjoy The Simpsons. It 
comes In on channel 25 here, so I final- 
ly gave up and got an antenna splitter 
so I could record the high channels. 
Recording programs makes it so ! don't 
have to go to the fndge during com mer- 
cials . , . part of my weight mainte- 
nance plan. 

I love Roseanna , Murphy Brown and 
Hunter, Law St Order is usually good. 
60 Minutes Is usually worth checking 
out, but my fast-forward button gets 
used a lot when they stretch things too 
much. So why is Wayne writing all this 
garbage? To give you some idea of 
things you can talk about. TV shows, 
movies, music or books, magazine arti- 
cles . . . all are fodder . 

I hadn't realized how much our wel- 
fare program was responsible for the 
mess in our inner cities. . the single 
parent families the teenage preg- 
nancies . , . the crime and drugs. Once 
I read about it, it all made sense. If 
you'd contacted me after I read that 
you'd have gotten an earful 

If you're from around San Diego 
I'd ask if you know about the organ 
concerts every Sunday at 2-3 p.m. in 
Baiboa Park. I've got a nice DAT of a 
concert sent by a reader. And I'd un- 
doubtedly be able to work In a brag 
about being a! the helm of a nuclear 
sub last year Hey, when we have some 
coups we don't keep 'em too carefully 
hidden. 

Now get down there on 2m and start 
talking with our new no-code Techs 
and get 'em on the right track. See if 
you can get f em to try 6m too. And 
some Oscar contacts. And packet. Tell 
em how much fun you've been having 
with these 

Tell 'em how much fun you had go- 
ing on a DXpedition to a Caribbean 
island. Explain how tittle il cost and 
how big the pile-ups were. Tell em how 
it felt to be king of the hill for a 
change. Or did you pop up to St. 
Pierre? That's close and inexpensive 
to visit . . . and you couldn't find a more 
friendly people to visit. 

Maybe you haven't DXpeditioned 
yet, but at least encourage the new 
Techs not to pass up this incredible 
part of our hobby. Explain mat the code 
is simple when they use Uncle 
Wayne's system, so not to let that keep 
them away from the fun of talking with 
DX or even being DX. 

If the concept of working DX being 
fun is alien to you f then it's time to wipe 
DXCC out of your mind and start actu- 
ally talking with DX ops. A chap from 



74 73 Amateur Radio Today * Jyne, 1991 



Spam sent me some flamenco CDs T so 
f sent Kim some ragtime CDs in ex- 
change. Golly. 1 haven 1 ! visited Spain 
since 1976, . .I've got to make some 
time to get over there again. And it's 
been even longer for Sweden and 
Aland! Meanwhile I'll be talking with 
the friends I've visited when I hear 
them on the air. 

If you run into Father Mo ran please 
say hello and tell hErn I'm hoping to gel 
some time to visit again Ditto any of my 
friends In Sabah. 

Oh, I almost forgot, yes, I know what 
you mean about the new no-code 
Techs And no. I don't think we're 
heading toward a CB-like probtem, 
Heck, if youVe listened to 20m m the 
last year you know the mess Herb 
KV4FZ and his gang have made there 
is as bad as anything we've ever heard 
onCS 

I'm not sure credit is due to Herb and 
his destruction crew, but they sure 
have totally destroyed any pride we 
amateurs have had about amateur 
radio as compared to CB I used to do 
a lot of CB operating and never in my 
life have f heard anything tike the 
mess Herb and Baxter, K1MAN, have 
generated. 

Self Education 

While lecturing to a graduate si u dent 
(MBA} class I mentioned several things 
which r expected any reasonably intel- 
ligent group should understand Faced 
with a room full of blank stares. I asked 
for a show of hands on how many of 
them were reading any news maga- 
zines You know, like Newswe&k and 
Time A few raised their hands — most 
didn't. 

Hmmm, no wonder so few young- 
sters today have heard about amateur 
radio. Few of them have heard about 
anything. If they don't teach it in 
school, ihen it must not be important, I 
guess. 

This almost tends to bring up a Ques- 
tion we should be asking: How can we 
get word of amateur radio to the kids? 
This isn't exactly a new question. 
We've been asking it ever since ama- 
teur radio growth dropped into the pits 
25 years ago We've been asking it. but 
no one has been answering 

Some ham industry people got to- 
gether a few years ago and worried the 
question Someone suggested; "How 
about getting kids interested in ham- 
ming via comic books?" This eventual- 
ly ended up wilh the ARRL sending out 
Archie ham comics. Tens of thousands 
of Ihese later we still haven't seen any 
significant response. Do you suppose 
it may take more than one mention of 
amateur radio lo get kids' attention? I 
notice thai MacDonakis doesn't rest 
their whole business on one mention 
Nor Pepsi. 

Before I get into some possible ways 
of getting our message across to 
youngsters, let's just mull over this sit- 
uation where our kids aren't reading 
any more than is required for school. 
Thai's bad news for them and for our 
society as a whole. 

Firslly, since they haven't been read- 
mg, they may not even be aware of how 



seriously they're being shortchanged 
on their education. They may not real- 
ize that they are getting one of the 
poorest educations in the civilized 
world. Or that this has resulted In 
America losing its competitive edge in 
one industry after another. 

Not knowing that ihey are being shut* 
fled through our schools with a mini- 
mum education, they have no way to 
know that how educated they are in life 
depends almost entirely on their own 
initiative and that they're unlikely to get 
much guidance from their teachers/' 

I was fortunate in a couple of re- 
spects First, our school system wasn't 
nearly as bad 50 years ago as it is 
now . though it was bad enough even 
then, \ hated it. Second, i had the mar- 
velous experience of attending the 
Navy Radio Mai en el Sen oof How the 
government managed to actually do 
something right is inexplicable No 
doubt a first That school was fantastic 
I believe it contributed significantly to 
our winning WWtl- 

The down side was that it was so 
good it soured me even further on our so- 
cialized compulsory education system. 

The Reading Habit 

Though I read quite a bit when I was 
young, it was moslly fiction Tarzan, 
Tom Swift. Oz. Benchley, Potter, H 
Allen Smith, and the wonderful Ernest 
Thompson Seton books, for in- 
stance it wasn't until I got deeply 
interested in clinical psychology that I 
began to go heavily into nonaction 

Kids today have a big world to keep 
track of That means reading. I'd rec- 
ommend Newsweek for general news 
(forget the daily newspapers}, insight 
for more in -depth news, and The New 
Yorker for real depth I also highly rec- 
ommend The Public interest and For- 
eign Affairs for a better understanding 
of current events. 

Reading these will also give you an 
enormous number of things lo talk 
about on the air And you'll be able lo 
talk intelligently, not just express uned- 
ucated opinion based on a shallow un* 
derstanrjmg People who've taken the 
trouble to know what's going on get fed 
up listening to that baloney. 

I recommend that kids also keep an 
oar in the water on technology, too 
They should have an understanding of 
current events m genetics, cosmology, 
panicle physics, chaos theory, fuzzy 
logic, and so on. Magazines such as 
Popular Science t Discover, Omni, and 
even the Scientific American, wrll help 
keep you abreast of science develop- 
ments 

If the Arabs we watched scream- 
ing and yelling m support of Saddam 
Hussein had had much education, I 
believe the whole Middle-Eastern 
situation would have developed quite 
differently. 

How many kids today have an under- 
standing of the major world religions? 
Of hew they started? What the people 
believe? 

Antenna Height Restrictions 

A Florida ham complained that 
they've got a restriction on antenna 



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CIRCLE 132 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 75 



— mm 



height In his neighborhood and the lo- 
cal authorities have ignored the FCC 
on the matter. He wrote to the ARRL 
and got stiffed. He wanted to know 
what I'd suggest he do. The local hams 
are at their wits' end. 

I wrote, saying, "Yes, the ARRL cer- 
tainly should do something about your 
lousy situation. "That's what a re at na- 
tional ham organization should be set 
up to help with. The fact is that the 
League has been very reluctant to 
tackle legal cases to help hams. When 
I mention thfs I get angry letters claim- 
ing Tm attacking the League. No one 
ever tries to tetl me it isn't true; it's just 
that I shouldn't mention it. 

JI Now, what to do. First, J recom- 
mend you start a petition around and 
get signatures. Get hundreds. What 
should the petition say? How about 
pointing out that in times of emergen- 
cy, such as hurricanes, which are not 
unknown in Florida, the only practical 
source for emergency communica- 
tions is amateur radio. You can quote 
from my editorials about the FCC's 
Long Range Planning Committee, 
which determined this was an absolute 
fact. 

To provide the needed emergency 



14- 



communications infrastructure, a ser- 
vice must already be in daily use-and 
this means antennas and towers. The 
beauty of amateur radio as compared 
to any other communications service is 
(a) amateurs are everywhere; (b) they 
fund their own equipment; and (c) they 
can provide long, medium or short 
range communications, as needed. I'd 
include some pictures of ham club 
communications buses and vans, 

"Then get the signatures at every 
hamfest and other event. Don't let one 
single ham get away from Dayton with- 
out getting a signature. Get the manu- 
facturers and dealers to cooperate with 
petitions at their booths. 

"Politicians react very positively to 
long lists of signatures. That's what I 
brought to the FCC in 1 973 when I ini- 
tiated the biggest set of rule changes in 
the FCC's history. 

"Find out who your enemy is. Which 
specific politicians are doing this? 
Then do whatever it takes to get them 
unelected. Make their lives miserable. 
Organize public confrontations, com- 
plete with the media invited. Picket, 

"Who is the chair of the Florida 
League of Cities? Go after this person 
where he or she lives. Get local hams 



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CIRCLE 1 32 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



American Heart 
Association 







to picket this person as not caring 
about lives and families. Cite discrimi- 
nation against technology. When a 
hurricane comes and lives are tost, and 
medicine and food are not available, 
then will the people who are supporting 
this monster put on some pressure? 

+, How about getting a video camera 
and staging some Mike Wallace-type 
live interviews with the offending politi- 
cians? You'll drive H em crazy and get 
wonderful material for club meeting 
showings. 

"I hope that is enough to get you 
started. 7 ' 

When youVe faced with a problem 
like that, be creative. There's always a 
way to solve problems , . . even when 
you're dealing with the government. 
Well, almost always. . there's always 
the IRS... 

Kids 

Have you been doing your home- 
work like I asked you . . or have you 
been doping off again? WefJ, while you 
were sitting there with a cold 807 in one 
hand watching a ball game, 1 was out 
there in the trenches for you . facing 
the enemy. 

Watt' II you stand there, facing a 
whole room full of 10-year-olds, trying 
to explain amateur radio to them. 
You're not going to try and tell me that 
your local school isn't going to let you 
come in and talk to (with) the kids t are 
you? Give me a break! They'll be de- 
lighted and you know it, It's just that 
you haven't bothered. 

Weil, I put off some meetings at what 
I smilingly call J, work" and had at a 
bunch of the local kids. I worked 'em 
over and got r em all fired up. Now 
they're anxious to set up a station so 
they can get on the air and talk. What 
are you going to do about it? 

You know as welt as I do that you've 
got an old rig in the close* somewhere 
that you aren't going to use again. 
Even if it doesn't work very well (or at 
all), the kids will go bananas if they can 
get it and fix it. This is a tot better use 
for it than lugging it to a flea market and 
getting a few bucks, The money will 
soon be wasted on food and you'fi have 
nothing to show for it except a little 
extra poundage on the scales. Well, I'll 
get you a letter from the kids telling you 
how much you've helped them. 

Coincidental the same day as I 
talked with the kids in Antrim (N H) J got 
a call from the nearby C rote hed Moun- 
tain Foundation. This is a rehabilitation 
center and special school for handi- 
capped children. They're going great 
guns in getting their kids interested in 
hamming and they desperately need 
some gear for their station. 

Kenwood, ICOM and Yaesu get a hun- 
d red o r so req uests fo r i ree ri gs a week , 
so that's not where you turn. The real 
ham gear mother lode lies i n y o u r ho use . 
There are tens of thousands of old rigs 
out there with their electro lyrics drying 
up and their transformers rusting. 

A good friend of mine got the idea of 
collecting old, no longer needed oscil* 
loscopes from labs and getting them to 
schools. This has almost turned into a 
business for him. 



Well, I've got a little room left in my 
barn to store a few rigs so we can get 
them to schools that need them. I 
haven't got much room because we 
just cleaned up the barn and made 
enough room to build a state-oMhe*art 
recording studio and that's filled a lot of 
the back of the barn. 

The best bet will be for you to drop 
me a note teiling me what you've got 
available in old ham gear, I'm starting 
with two local schools that need rigs, 
but I'll bet I'll get a hundred letters from 
other schools when they read this. I'll 
try and match your gear with a school. 
That way you'll know where it's gone, 

If you 11 start giving talks about how 
much fun amateur radio is to your focal 
school kids, you'll get a real kick. They 
love the idea of talking to the world. 
They're excited about packet and talk- 
ing with M/rand via our other satellites. 
They can hardly wait to start building 
things. 

One of the projects Ive got sched- 
uled for my new recording studio is to 
start reading some books onto tape so 
we can put out books for kids on CDs 
and cassettes. I was amazed to find 
that almost 1 00% of the kids I was talk- 
ing with are avid readers. Yep, they're 
actually reading books! 

They'd all heard about the "Wizard 
of Oz T " but most of 'em didn't know 
there are 1 3 Oz books. I'm planning on 
recording 'em all. When I was their age 
I read 'em all and loved 'em. 

None of the kids (or teachers) had 
heard of Ernest Thompson Seton, so 
they've got a fantastic surprise coming 
when they hear me reading his books. I 
read 'em all when I was a kid. Over and 
over. They're wild animal stories told 
from the perspective of the animals. 

I was surprised, too, that so many of 
their parents take time to read to their 
kids. Perhaps New Hampshire parents 
are different, but half of the kids in the 
class said their parents regularly read 
to them. That's what got me interested 
in reading. When I was young my moth- 
er used to read to me every noon when 
I was home from school for lunch. 

For older people {and kids, too) I'm 
going to start reading the Kai Lung 
books by Ernest 8 r amah. Too bad if 
you don't know how wonderful they 
are. Maybe I'll get you to try a CD or 
cassette. 

I'll be reading some poetry, too. . . 
probably starting with Eugene Field 
and his "Poems of Childhood." I've 
been surprised to find that many 
people aren't familiar with Field. Tsk. 

It's fun to share enthusiasms with 
people. That's mainly why I'm into pub* 
lishing. I'm sharing my love of music, 
poetry, books and amateur radio. You 
can share your excitement over ama- 
teur radio with the kids tn your local 
schools. Help 'em get a club going. I'll 
see if I can round up some equipment 
from 73 readers to heip. Let's dig out 
some of those old rigs, dust em off and 
see if they're working. 

Send me a note telling me what 
you've got available . . . send it to: Rigs 
for Kids, 73 Amateur Radio Today, 
Forest Road, Hancock NM 03449. 



76 73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 




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CIRCLE 100 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 77 




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CIRCLE 1 7 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

78 73 Amateur Radio Today • June/1991 



We are happy to provide Ham Help tistmgs 
tree on a space avaHabh basis. To make our 
job easier and to ensure that your listing & 
correct please type or print your request 
ctearty double spaced, on a fuM(B^ "nil'} 
sheet of paper. Use upper- and fower-cmse 
letters where appropriate Also, print num- 
bers carefully— a h for example, canbemts 
read as the letters I or i, or even the number 7 
You may also upload a ftsting as E-mail to 
Sysop to the 73 BBS. 1603} 525-1*38. 8 data 
bits. parity, 1 stop bit Thank you tot your 
cooperation. 

Wanted: Instruction manual (or operating 
EICO Model 232 VTVM Meyer Mmchen 
AG5G, 4635 SW Fwy.. Houston TX 77027. 
(713)622-6161, 

A Kenwood TS-14QS was stolen from I ha 
Towson State University ARC on Nov 2$, 
1990 Us serial number is 9100556 and it has 
a TSU property tag #144378 It had no option- 
al filters and was aboul a year old. The TS- 
1405 was our only piece of high-quality mod- 
ern gear and it will be extremely difficult to 
replace, Anyone with informal Ion should con* 
tact John EggerKSGHH, Towson State Dept. 
of Economics, (301)830-2954 

Calling all Vielnam-era MARS Operator*! 
MARS officials have asked Dr Paul Seipione 
AA2AV (MARS callsign AAASPP) to write a 
boo* about the history of MARS operations 
during the Vietnam War (1M4-197S}. Sap*- 
one has developed a database of more than 
200 Nam MARS ops but estimates there are 
several thousand more. It you are one. or 
know one. please contact Sop ion* to* a 
MARS Nam questionnaire His book (to be 
published in 1992) will have a section with the 
names and current caiisigns and QTHs of 
MARS Nam ops. lo help reunite okj friends. 
Write Seipione AA2AV, 5 Burr Drive , 
lUetuchenNJ 08840, ot caM (908} 548-8096 . 

Please help. 1 need some crystals lor Heath 
HW-16 lo get a new Novice on the air. I will 
pay the postage Send info to Jim Clark 
WD5HMM. Rt h Box 468. Cleburne TX 
76031 Thanks, 

I am a veteran of the Afghanistan conflict, 
and would like to organize a meeting with 
American ham Vieinam veterans to discuss 
world peace Last summer nearly 80 Soviet 
vets got together and worked with the special 
call R3AFG (Russia 3 Afghanistan) Their 
goal is to invite American vets to the Soviet 
Union during the summer of 1991 , i\ interest- 
ed please wrile to Alex Marvftanko UA®CT t 
P.O. Box 1, Garovka-2, Khabarovsk 682305, 
USSR. 

Wanted- A copy of the manual (or Collins 
S16E-1 or 2 mobile power supply. 1 wilt pay 
costs. J. Orgnero, Box 32, Site 7. SB 1, Cal- 
gary A3 T2M 4N3. Canada, 

I am a Novice and would like to obtain info 
about equipment for roa-huni sniffing. I need 
to know what companies salt ii. whai is com- 
monly used, and how small the transmitters 
can be made Sob Walker. Box 65, Ga/iano 
Island BC. Canada 

I need a copy of the schematics or booklets 
on the SSE-33 transceiver, the Hallicrahera 
SX-ifli receiver, and the HaSicrafiers HT-34 
transmitter If anyone knows of any upgrades 
or improvements to these, please let me 
know. 1 will pay reasonable copying costs 
Paul Christie ex K2UKT, 206-27 15th Road, 
Bayside NY 11360 

Needed: Manuals tor Regency MT-1 5 and 
MT-25 marine 12-channel, commercial BTH 
201/301/204 etc. 1, 2 and 4 channel, and 
some UHF Please send me a postlQSL card 
stating what you have, copy fee, or whether 
you are willing to lend for me to copy. Many 
thanks. David J Brown W9CGI. 14670 N 
Cumberland Rd. r Noblesvifle IN 48060, or 
FAX via Jim Adams WA9BHF, {317} 253- 
0364 

I am looking for Iwo books, One Is I he MCS- 
85 Users Manual Tor the B0B5 microproces- 
sor. The 01 her is published by Zllog for Its Z-BO 
series microprocessors, explaining pin func- 
tions and machine language in struct lone. 
Thanks, in advance, to all who can helpl Scoff 
A. Littfm N&EDV, PO Box 1215, Hayward Wi 
54843. 

I need documentation and/or software/ 
hardware supporting the RS Model III and a 
Sanyo "Silver Fox" MBC 550-2 Any help 
appreciated. MM Barrette N1GPV. 21 Bre- 
ton Ave., Sanford ME 040 73-3236 



Your Bulletin Board 

I am 1 4. and working on my Novice 1*cket. I 
would like to as* all the hams out there ii they 
have any extra stuff just collecting dust which 
could get me started towards my Extra li- 
cense. I would also like to ask if any ham in the 
Modesto. California, area has any interest in 
helping me get my Novice license I'm having 
a lot of (rouble with Ihe code Brandon Wttson, 
920BriggsAve. Modesto CA 9S35 1 

Wanted: Literature tor Cushcratt antenna 
models A-147-ii> 124-WB and Tert-3 Also, 
schematic for Heath HWS-2 hancRwW trans- 
ceiver Glenn Torres KB5AYO f Rl I Box 580- 
B. Reserve LA 70084 

Law student gathering info for thesis, ff you 
feel the FCC has ever violated your constitu- 
tional rights, pfease send a brief summary to 
George F Amies, Jr t 2571 Bethany Ln., Pow- 
der Springs GA 30073, 

Needed: Diagram for a Bear- Cat BC-250 
scanner and any Info on modifications. Also 
need manual and diagram for Tempo One or 
FT-200 Yaesu transceiver Any one have pro- 
grams for RS Model 4 compuier for ham ra^ 
die? Need also diagram for GW/tilierien- 
hancer thai appeared in OS T a lew years ago. 
Will pay copying and shipping Send quote lo 
Patrick Benesch KH4MA i Gen Del. Loyatt 
KY 40954. 

Please send me names and addresses of 
people or companies who supply communi- 
cations software for the Atari 520/1040 STE 
computers Also, systems to send and re- 
ceive CW RTTV (Baudot & ASCII), modified 
ASCII, etc Leonard Saddler, t*2V Reeve 
Ave , Bakersfteid CA 93307. 

I need copies of any and all available docu- 
mentation (manuals, software, schematics, 
etc.) for the Seequa Chameleon" portable 
computer- This machine, circa 1984^*5, nad 
both 8088 & Z-80 CPUs, and could run MS- 
DOS A CP/M software Will supply drsks and 
pay costs T Mark Long. 90 f Chalk Level Rd 
Apt V-11. Durham NC 27704 (919} 471- 
3147. Evenings Si weekends 

DESPERATE!! I need an inexpensive trarv 
ceiver and/or antenna ior any band 6 meters 
thru MO MHz. Have my license but not a lot of 
cash to buy equipment. I hope someone out 
there can help me, I'm dying to get on the air, 
I'm not fussy Please write me it you have a 
spare rig you wouid like to sell to someone 
who would greatly appreciate It Pave 
WB1FDZ, P.O. Box 892, Northboro MA 
01532, 

I am in desperate need of an owner's manu- 
al for an IC-730 Will pay all expenses for 
good copy. Call coilecl between & am. and 1 
p,m, CST (501) 398-6715, 

I am helping John Allen Phillips, 424 W. 
Cedar. Durant OK 74701 to become a ham. 
He has been blind since 19T7. He has no 
equipment except a code practice oscillator I 
built for him. Any used ham gear would surely 
be appreciated. Thanks Randy E Cassets 
KA5JTX. PO. Box 1 1, Atoka OK 74625 Mr 
Phillips r phone number is (405} 924-2366 

I am looking for any information on any 
Wilson tribander 3-elemenl beam antenna I 
will pay any cost involved Don LioydKNSQQ. 
BIO Wolf Trail. Cassetbeny Ft 32707 

Old-trmer, since 1929, desperately needs 
used HF transceiver, prefer abty small, like 
1C-735, FT-7S7, Argoay II, etc . m good worth- 
ing condition. Many thanks In advance and 
best 73. Zbignievt M Rybka SP8HR, 
ut Radzvmka 16 m.66. 20-851, Lublin S7. 
POLAND, 

Wanted: ManuaJ/schematica for Scott In- 
strument Laboratories telemetry FM receiv- 
ers, models t3t2-1 through ? More than hap- 
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73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 79 




Number 30 on your Feedback card 



Hams Around the World 



Bob Winn W5KNE 
fcQRZDX 
P.O. Box 832205 
Richardson TX 75063 

QRP DX? 

I did something this year that I never 
intended to do. I've been telling people 
for years that 1 wouldn't do it, no way! 
But 1 did it anyway — 1 operated QRP! 

I operated ORP during the early 
hours of the ARRL International DX 
C W Contest I don't know what caused 
me to do this, excessive sunspots or 
mkJdIe-age crazies (my XYL suggests 
it is over-th-e-hill crazies) Whatever it 
was, I just sat down in from of my 100 
watt transceivef/kW amplifier station 
and "unloaded" my transceiver to 5 
watts and proceeded to work stations. 

It was easy (uh, relatively easy), and 
within the first hour of the contest I had 
worked enough stations to qualify for 
the Worked All Continents Award. After 
that, with WAC under my belt. I was 
really hooked. The adrenalin was 
pumping, and I was having fun. 

I started working on DXCC/QRP. it 
seemed to be as easy as working sta- 
tions on a kW, but then I realized that it 
wasn't, ft took a lew more calls to worfc 
each station. I had to use good DX op- 
erating techniques, I was stalking new 
countries, aiming correctly, and hitting 
the target. One hundred ORP coun- 
tries were within sight 

This brings us to this month's 
column, and the topic of champions— 
DXing techniques. We'll begin a series 
of discussions that may be of benefit to 
all DXers, 

DXIng Techniques 

Though it helps, you don't have to 
have high power and big antennas to 
successfully work DX. In most cases, 
technique is mora important than pow- 
er. Most stations outside of the U.S. 
run 100 watts or less, but they are still 
successful. 

What are good DXing techniques? 

Almost anything you do that yields 
another notch in your country count is a 
good technique, as long as your behav- 
ior in the pile-ups is reasonable and 
ethical. You should not cause undue 
Interference^ call out of turn, call the 
DX station long distance to arrange a 
QSO P etc. 

If you spend 15 hours in the same 
pile-up to work a station, your tech- 
nique—if it can be called that— is 
faulty. The secret to successfully work' 
ing a DX station is to put your signal on 
the frequency where the OX station is 
listening. It is that simple. But. of 
course, it helps if your signal is the only 
one on thai frequency, and the DX op- 
erator is cooperating! 

The DX Operator vs Technique 

The best technique in the world, 
even coupled with high power and big 



antennas, is often of little use if the DX 
operator is a poor operator. Here are a 
few examples. A DX operator who 
sends CW at 50 wpm often creates 
confusion, because many calling oper- 
ators cannot understand his instruc- 
tions (such as J A only, Europe only, 
UP 10, etc), A DX operator who asks 
for USA only, then proceeds 10 work 
Europe is asking for trouble, confuses 
the callers and makes your job more 
difficult. A DX operator who states "UP 
107" but who in fact Is working stations 
5 kHz below or 40 kHz above his fre- 
quency is difficult to work. 

Practical Techniques 

Okay, let's discuss techniques. 
There are only a handful, but with nu- 
rnefous variations. Each one may be 
modified to suit your needs or the situa- 
tion 

First: Listen t listen, iisteni You must 
listen to the DX operator and under- 
stand how he is working other stations, 
it is usually foolish to jump Into a pile- 
up without first understanding what the 
DX operator is doing, where he is lis- 
tening, and whether he is working split 
or on his own frequency. 

After listening to the DX station for a 
few minutes, confirm his identity, Then 
note whether he is taking full call signs 
only, parts of callsigns, or repeatedly 
"QRZeding" when he cannot pick out 
a call sign How fast is he working sta- 
tions? Is he working statins on or near 
his own frequency? Is he announcing 
where he is listening? Is there a distinct 
break between each station he works? 

Second: Listen to the policemen. 
The policemen on the frequency can 
often provide clues about the DX oper- 
ator's operating pattern. If they con tin - 
uaHysay"UP 10. DWN 5," or such, the 
DX operator is working in split frequen- 
cy mode, or "split* " operation. That is, 
he's listening on one frequency and 
answering on another. His listening 
frequency may be either above or be- 
low his transmit frequency In split op- 
eration, the separation from his fre- 
quency will usually be from 2 to 10 kHz 
on CW, On SSB T separations of 5, 5G\ 
100 kHz or more are not unusual 

Third; Listen io the stations he is 
working. Listening is the name of the 
game. If you cannot hear these sta- 
tion s H try rotating your antenna to see if 
you can find them. 

If he is working stations On or near 
his own frequency, determine how 
close to his frequency they are And. is 
there a pattern? Always a 100 Hz 
higher? 200 Hz? Does he work stations 
farther away from his own frequency 
each time, but never more than a half 
kHz or so? 

It the stations he is working are on 
his own frequency, your task is simpler 
in one respect, but more difficult in an- 
other. You II be sharing the frequency 
with all of the other callers. 



QSL Routes 



3D2XV 


via VK2BCH, direct only 


3X1 AU 


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3X1 US 


Arnold Olivo, US Embassy, 




Box 603. Conakry. Guinea 


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via OZ1 LGF 


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P,0-Box9l t Yungho 




Taipei, Taiwan 


BZ4RBC 


P.O. Box 538, Nanjing. 




People's Republic of China 


C04QH 


P.O. Box 1529, fsie of Pines. Cuba 


D68KN 


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D68YD 


viaJL3UIX 


D68YH 


via JL3UIX 


EI7M 


via EI5FT 


F6EWE 


Gerard Aurieres, 10 Ch Le Tintoret 




Apt 294, F-31100 Toulouse, France 


FG5R 


via W7E J 


FWGBX 


viaZLlAMO 


ITSA 


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via HB9ARP 


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ON9CFU 


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P43DO 


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Box 3&8 a Kaliningrad 23601 6, USSR 


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via U05WU 


RJfcJ 


via W8JMM 


T22XX 


via DL2GBT 


T22YL 


via DL5UF 


T32PO 


via NH6UY 


TA2ZA 


Operator Robert: Robert W, Kipling 




And Sokak 2/16, 06660 Can kay a, 




Ankara. Turkey 


T06REF 


viaFlDBT 


TW3M 


vlaFEUCG 


UA0KAP/A 


via KL7HBC 


UT8U/RB5AA 


Box 8, Sumy 244014, USSR 


V29A 


via W4FRU 


V29M 


via KQ2M 


VP5VDV 


via WD4JNS 



If you have determined that he is not 
working stations on his own frequency, 
your task is to find the pile-up of stations 
who are calling and working him. He is 
working "spilt/ 1 and he may be listen- 
ing almost anywhere, but hopefully not 
too far from his transmit frequency. 

The DX operator may specify where 
he is listening, or the policemen may 
offer a clue (as explained above). If not, 
then you must hunt for the group of 
stations calling him. This task is more 
difficult if more than one popular DX 
station is active m the same area on the 
band. 



Finding the pile-up on SSB is 
if the DX operator is operating on what 
we call "the usual DX frequencies": 
14145, 14195, 21295. etc. In this case, 
"the usual calling frequencies 71 are: 
14150-160. 14200-210, 21300-310, 
or some reasonable variation. Don't 
forget to check below his frequency, 
too, 

Until next monlh: listen, listen, listen, 
and try to understand what each DX 
operator is doing before you call and 
call. Next month, well discuss how to 
put your signal right where the DX op- 
erator is listening 




60 73 Amateur Radio Today * June, 1991 




Omar 

WA8FON 



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73 



Number 31 on your Feedback card 



INTERNATIONAL 



Arnte Johnson N1BAC 
103 Old Homestead Hwy, 
N.Swanzey.NH 03431 

Notes from FN42 

One of the great things about work- 
ing for 73 ts that t have access to many 
international electronics and ham ra- 
dio magazines. Some of these maga- 
zines are published in English, and 
others are not. And I only speak, read t 
and write m one language. English. 

f have a few of these magazines sit- 
ting on my desk right now* They repre- 
sent the Soviet Union , Czechoslo- 
vakia, Switzerland, Italy ; Germany, 
and Australia, each in its native lan- 
guage, What can I do except look at the 
pretty pictures? 

Well, t can read the schematics to a 
great extent. Circuit layout, and the 
symbols for values and most compo- 
nents, are universal, in some coun+ 
tries* the convention is to use a comma 
instead of a period to represent a deci* 
mat, but thats not too hard to figure 
out. The only difficulty t might have is 
with some of the labels: inputs and out- 
puts, tot example . are in the native lan- 
guage. 

In the text, thecaltsigns are in tetters 
and Arabic numerals, lean see similar- 
ities among the languages, though I 'm 
no ftnguist, Certainly, what's most im* 
portant ts that alt these magazines 
were developed with the love of elec- 
tronics and amateur radio as the focus. 
Regardless of the language, they con- 
vey that love, and also the desire to 
further our knowledge of the world 
around us. 

t am sorry I don't understand ail 
these languages, as I know I would 
learn a lot more about this hobby thai I 
love, t had to put my desire to learn 
basic Russian on the back burner, as 
we say, because I had too many irons 
in the fire. Hopefully r f will be able to 
resume my attempt m the fail. Even a 
little teaming makes the world a better 
place: though people speak different 
languages, we alt have much in com- 
mon. 

A couple of items regarding the April 
column: The name of one of the mem- 
bers of the 4X9QBS crew (Photo E, 
April 1991) was left out He is Mow 
4X4PE, 4th from the teh on the top row 
between 4X6YY and 4XBEA Next, 
took at Photo C. A new prefix for you 
prefix hunters? No; the photo was unin* 
tentionafty reversed during production 
and printing. Sorry, Tmo. At least we 
got the calisign right in the photo cap- 
tion —Arnie* NtBAC. 

Roundup 

Japan From the JARL News: The 
annual JARL-sponsored Ham Fair, 
one oMhe biggest events of its kind, will 
be held at the New Hall of the Tokyo 
International Trade Center at Harumi, 
Tokyo, as last yean Ham Fair '91 wilt 
run from Friday. August 23 through 



Sunday* August 25. 1991. Last year 
this Mr attracted a total of 59.000 visi- 
tors 

On the first floor will be various 
events, including a much-waited spe- 
cial commemorative radio Station, 
SJ 1 HAM, Not to be forgotten will be the 
JAIA Fair (sponsored by Japan Ama- 
teur industries Association) displaying 
iheir tempting array of various updated 
and sophisticated equipment. 

On the second floor, many amateur 
radio clubs will be giving a full account 
of their activities and selling heaps of 
"junk" at their own booths, midst a 
friendly and exciting atmosphere. 

Next in The JARL News, the All 
Asian DX Contest Schedule has been 
changed so as not to coincide with the 
annual Ham Fair, Effective this year, 
the schedule is as follows: PHONE: 
The Brat Saturday of September, from 
00:00 UTC through 24:00 of the follow- 
ing day {instead of the third Saturday of 
June): CW: The third Saturday of June, 
from 00:00 UTC through 24:00 Of the 
following day, instead of the fourth Sat- 
urday of August 

Included in the JARL newsletter 
were "Rules of ARDF Competition 
Amended' and "Extension of the 
VVARC "79' Award"" Both provided 
lengthy information and wit) be placed 
m the 73INTL Special Interest Group 
portion of the 73 BBS {connect mfo pro- 
vided on the "Table of Contents" page 
of the magazine). 

U.S.A. Although most hams were 
aware that the April STS-37 shuttle 
mission had an all-ham crew, much of 
the public didn't know. Thanks to The 
Wall Street Journal, many more will 
now know. Featured on the front page 
of its March 28, 1 991 issue was "Hams 
in Space/' informing the reader that aJI 
five astronauts on the coming Atlantis 
shuttle flight are licensed amateur ra- 
dio operators. Also, it stated thai the 
first all-ham crew was inspired by its 
pilot. Ken Cameron, who's active in ra- 
dio education. 

ILS.S.R. Andy Fyodorov RW3AH 
writes: "Big Circle" is a unique under- 



taking that includes several dog sled 
expeditions to northern regions of 
Asia. America, and Europe, 

In 1990, the "Big Circle* expedition 
passed across the Chukot Peninsula, 
and ended on Wrangel Island in the 
Arctic Ocean. 

In 1 991 , there will be an expedition to 
the North Pole. 

In the 1992-1996 period there will be 
expeditions in the li Super*Arctic Cir* 
cle" series through the snow and ice of 
the Chukot and Alaska pen i n sul as . and 
the arctic regions of Canada, Green- 
land, and Scandinavia. Americans. 
Russians, and representatives of other 
northern nations will take pan in these 
expeditions. 

[Andy sent his QSL card which de- 
picts the friendship that has developed 
between the U.S.S.R. and the U.S. A. 
Just think what might happen it more 
common ventures are started between 
countries throughout the world. Ama- 
teur radio has been doing these things 
for many years. —Amiej 




FSRAEL 

Ron Gang 4X1 fAK 

Kibbutz Urim 

DM Hanagev 85530 

Israel 

Packet: 4XlMK@4Z4SV.tSREU 

Israel gets 6 meters! I'm happy to 
report that since the beginning of 
February, a silver of the 50 MHz band 
has been made available to Israeli ra- 
dio amateurs. It should be noted that 
this band is not an amateur allocation 
here in ITU Region l P yet due to the 
interest shown by amateurs in Europe 
and Asia in the band, certain countries 
have been opening up some of the 
spectrum. Happily, Israel has now 
joined them, and AXfAZ will be a 
sought-after prefix on 50 MHz. 

Operating conditions are somewhat 
restricted; Only Class A licensees may 
Operate on 6 meters and from SO 1 00 to 
50, 150 MHz with a maximum output 
power of 25 watts. Nonetheless, when 
the band is open, as it is now quite 
oh en here at the peak of Sunspot Cycle 




QTH: 




0000 HL7/RW3AH 

RW3AH BERING BRIDGE o P 




RADIO 


DATE 


GMT 


2xWAY 


RST 


*¥r 


— r 


e^SoA 











QSL Via P.O. Box 899, MOSCOW, 127018, USSR 



22. you don't need too much power to 
get out? 

By the time you are reading this, 
hopefully Morel 4X1AD will already 
have his SSB/CW station operating on 
the band. Six meter enthusiasts are 
advised to listen as welt for weak FM 
signals, as it is possible (hat some 
stations will be activating military sur- 
plus gear. 




LITHUANIA 

Jonas Paskauskas L Y2ZZ 
PO Box 7t 
Siauliai 2354QQ 
Lithuania 

Lithuanian Amateur Radio Con- 
ference, By now. many of you have 
already made your plans for the 
Lithuanian Amateur Radio Conference 
scheduled for the first week in June in 
Vilnius, Lithuania. Even though we are 
still experiencing some political prob- 
lems, conference plans are still contin- 
uing. 

We are not the only ones that are 
continuing with our plans. Other orga- 
nizations are holding conferences and 
group meetings, including an interna- 
tional folk dance festival. Come and 
have a good time with us. 




Photo A, The QSL card of Andy RW3AH commemorating the Bering Bridge, the 
bridge between the U S $. R and the U.S.A. 



REPUBLIC OF KOREA (SOUTH) 

Byong-Joo Cho HL5AP 

PO Box 4, Haeundae 

Pusan 

Republic of Korea &12-SQ0 

Commemorating the 30th An- 
niversary of Amateur Radio Opera* 

tion. Thank you very much, everyone 
of the world, for your contacts on the air 
under the special calisign of HL3BAP 
from September 1 lo December 31, 
1991. It has been 30 years since I be- 
gan operating under the calisign of 
H M 1 AP [the second first class amateur 
radio operator license issued after 
HM 1 AD} when Korean nationals began 
operating in 1960. 

I started up with a home-brew hg, 
using an 807 tube in the final and run- 
ning 15 watts I contacted many DX 
stations all over the world, I would like 
to express my sincere appreciation for 
all of your warm friendship and good- 
will extended to me. I'll cherish the ex- 
citement and joy I've shared with so 
many amateur stations, and hope our 
mutual ham-life continues prosperous. 

I have made a special OSL card for 
HL30AP, and I would like to send it to 
all who have made contact with me 
under that call Ptease send your QSL 
with an SASE. 

During March 9-12, 199T T I visited 
Taipei, Taiwan, for the inaugural meet- 
ing of the Chinese Taipei Amaiuer Ra- 
dio League (CTART) At the general 



82 73 Amateur Radio Today • June. 1991 



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members of the CTARL attended . Dur- 
ing this celebration, they operated their 
league station BV0AHL. 

If you need a contact fiom anyone in 
BV4and. t can introduce you to one of 
my friends who is very active on SSB 
and CW from Taipei, He is also a keen 
award hunter 73 for now. 




Photo 0- The special QSL card of Byong-Joo Cho HL36AP/HL5AP commemorat- 
ing $0 years of amateur radio operation Clockwise t beginning at the calf sign, the 
photos show: 19$t. 1970, 1975, and f 990. 



meeting there were many guesis, in* 
eluding Mr. Rankin 9V1RHA/K3QV, 
chairman of IARU Region 3; Mr. Hara 
JA1AN, president of the JARL; Mr. 
Song HLiCG. on behalf of the KARL 



president; and Mr. Uchioori JA1IRT, 
editor of CQ Ham Radio (Japan). I at- 
tended as a guest of the KARL as an 
elder statesman (charter member). 
Some Okmawan hams and about 300 



SWEDEN 

Rune Wande SMQCOP 
Frejavagen TO 
S-155Q0Nykvatn 
jinreoen 

YL World '91. Last year a group of 
Swedish YLs attended a YL conven- 
tion in Hawaii, and decided to arrange 
a YL meeting in Sweden in 1991 . This 
event, called "YL World T 9 V will take 
place in Stockholm, Sweden, during 
the midsummer festivities. By the time 
(his is in print, the deadline for registra- 
tion is probably past, but if you are go- 



ing to be in the Stockholm area around 
June 20-23, you may call Kerstin 
SM5EUU. phone -46 2 1 33 04 85, for 
information SK0YL will be active dur- 
ing this event 

International CW traffic net. The 
Scandinavian CW Activity Group 
(SCAG) was formed in 1974. The idea 
was to practice message handling. 
Some difficulties were encountered in 
the beginning because of different 
thoughts about third-party traffic. Our 
thinking was mat handling messages 
about amateur radio matters between 
licensed radio amateurs could not 
violate any third-party traffic restric- 
tions. Why wouldn't you be allowed to 
send a message to a ham operator 
through another ham operator? If you 
can talk with him or her directly, why 
shouldn't you be allowed to have a 
message passed to him or her? How- 
ever, to forward a message to a person 
outside the ham ranks is not allowed 
here. (Maybe changes wilt happen— 
Arnie.J SCAG is running an interna* 
tional CW traffic net every Saturday at 
1 100 UTC on 14.065 MHz, Net control 
station is SK7SSK. See you there. 



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84 73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 




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SEE THE SPACE SHUTTLE VIDEO 

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Photo A. The W8BJN HAMCAM ready for action. 



Bill Brown WB8ELK 
%73 Magazine 
Forest Road 
Hancock NH 03449 

Take to the Road 

Now that Field Day is approaching, 
you might think about taking your ATV 
station on the road. Each year a num- 
ber of ATVers set up at Field Day sites 
and have fun exchanging pictures, 

If you pJan to operate ATV during 
Field Day, alert the locals and rack up a 
few new points. It's also a lot of fun to 
show those who decided to stay home 
just how much fun you're having 
{mosquitos don't show up well on 
video). Who knows, maybe a close-up 
camera shot of some of that fantastic 
food may convince some more folks to 
come out and operate! The ATV crew 
at last year's Nashua (New Hampshire) 
Amateur Radio Club (NARC) site spent 
a lot of time filming their complete on- 
site kitchen. That way they were close 
by when the next batch of goodies ap- 
peared. Not only did they have a full- 
sized electric range (they even baked 



cookies!), but they brought afong a re- 
frigerator stocked with ice cream. i un- 
derstand that next year they'll include 
a kitchen sink! 

A Field Day site is also a great place 
to demonstrate ATV to your club mem- 
bers and any visitors . A couple of years 
ago, we encouraged a number of area 
groups to bring out ATV to their Field 
Day focations. To ensure that they had 
something to watch, Met Alberty 
KA8LWR and myself went up in his 
Cessna 172 to about 10,000 feet. We 
had a blast working several sites 
across Ohio and Michigan. 

Portable Demos 

You don't have to wait for Field 
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Summer is a great time to put on a 
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teresting demo for the Brooks Institute 
of Photography in Santa Barbara, Cali- 
fornia. He set up a link from the insti- 
tute down to a nearby shopping malf 
via 434 MHz ATV. One of the students 
at the institute put on a skit about re- 




pairing appliances. Down at the mail 
people crowded around the TV set to 
watch "Mr. Fix-It Man/' Little did they 
realize that the fix-it man could see 
them via a 10 GHz link back up to the 
Institute. In the middle of his spiel he'd 
point at one of the audience and ask 
them a question. You can imagine the 
shocked reaction. Some pretty lively 
exchanges resulted, all done via a full- 
duplex ATV link. 

If you plan to do a number of "road 
shows/' you may want to organize 
your equipment to aliow for a quick 
setup. Members of the Bayonne Emer- 
gency Management Amateur Radio 
Club (BEMARC) in Bayonne, New 
Jersey, have been giving demos to a 
number of area radio clubs. John 
WA2QYX, Danny N2EHN and Mike 
KB2EQQ have modified Danny's van 
for some portable ATV action. When 
they arrive for a club demo, they usual- 
ly set up the van at a nearby interesting 
location f such as a busy intersection or 
shopping area. 



The club jumped at the chance, and 
proceeded to refurbish the aging vehi- 
cle. After a little body work and some 
fresh paint, they were ready to put in 
the radio equipment. 

They installed a PC Electronics ATV 
transceiver (TC70-1) and beam anten- 
na, video switcher, three rack-mounted 
video monitors, sound board, tape 
deck, VCR, amplifier and two video 
cameras. Next they installed a KWM-2 
for HF T a 2 meter FM rig, a CB and a 
Civil Defense radio. They had a little 
room left over, so they threw in a scan- 
ner to monitor emergency service fre- 
quencies as well. 

The completed HAMCAM has two 
operating positions. One is dedicated 
to HF communications and the other 
operates on ATV and 2 meter FM. Each 
position is designed for easy access to 
the equipment and is quite comforable 
for extended sessions due to the large 
plush chairs and air-conditioning (a 
heater is available during the winter), 

Once at their destination, it just takes 




Photo C. Inside of the HAMCAM showing the ATV transceiver and 2m station 
nestled on shelves In the back of the van. 



Photo B. The ATV operating position inside of the HAMCAM. 



Mike KB2EQQ usually starts the 
ATV program inside the club and then 
has Danny and John transmit an out- 
side view back into the clubhouse. 
Usually a few of the club members 
come out to be momentary TV stars. A 
few random interviews of innocent 
pedestrians may have the potential of a 
"David Letterman 1 ' style show. See 
''Hams with Class" in the February is- 
sue of 73 for more on the BE MARC 
club's activities. 

If you plan on doing a lot of ATV road 
shows, you may want to build up your 
own dedicated minicam truck just like 
the commercial TV stations. Amateurs 
in central Ohio have done just that! 

The HAMCAM 

Gene Kirby W8BJN received an in- 
teresting offer back in July of 1989. A 
fellow ham who worked at a nearby 
commercial TV station (WBNS) ex- 
plained that their station was retiring 
one of their RAPIDCAM remote TV 
trucks and wanted to offer it to the 
Union County Amateur Radio Club 
(Marysviile, Ohio). 



a few minutes to swing the antennas up 
to their operating position, set up the 
two TV cameras on tripods and put the 
HAMCAM on-the-air. After that, the op- 
erator uses his video switch panei to 
select between the two camera views 
and to watch any incoming ATV sig- 
nals. The two camera views are contin- 
uously displayed on two of the moni- 
tors. The third monitor is used to 
receive ATV from a remote site or com- 
mand center. They even have big 
floodlights installed on top Of the van 
for night duty [ 

Em ergenc ies/De mo nstra t i on s 

The Union County club plans to use 
the HAMCAM to help out to emergen- 
cies, demonstrations, parades, fairs or 
anywhere a portable command station 
is needed. 

You don't need an actual TV mini- 
cam truck to build your own HAMCAM. 
Good-sized vans can be obtained fairly 
reasonably if you're wilting to do a fittle 
maintenance. It sure makes a good 
club project and can really help out 
your community In an emergency. 



73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 85 





IPflx 



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UW0691 




Number 33 on your Feedback card 



AN DOM OUTPUT 

David Cassidy Nl GPH 



■ didn't think this topic would come up 
again, but it seems the debate over no- 
code is STILL raging. Can you believe it? 
Mere we are, over four months after the 
first no-code Technicians received their 
licenses, and a large group of Nean- 
derthals within our midst continue to bitch, 
moan, argue and predict the doom and 
demise of amateur radio. 

Today I received a copy ol a letter, sent 
lo the FCC by an amateur radio club in 
California (I won't embarrass the mem- 
bers of this club by revealing their name), 
signed by the president of said club. Fisting 
all of the reasons why this particular group 
ol geriatric amateurs was opposed to the 
no-code license. It these folks wanted to 
have their opinions heard on the matter, 
why did they wait until April lo do it? Kinds* 
late no w 4 boys. 

To be sure, there are plenty of intelligent 
amateurs out there who have a problem 
with eliminating the code requirement 
Some of the more interesting GSOs I've 
had inlhe last few months have been lively 
discussions of this issue. But having a 
well-formed opinion and expressing rt writh 
intelligence is worlds away from what I'm 
hearing on the bands — the same old stu- 
pidity, parroted over and over, by a bunch 
of old men who probably haven't touched 
their code keys In 20 years and couldn't 
pass a 13 wpm code test if their lives de- 
pended on it. 

One more time, for the brain-dead, let's 
examine the major objections to no-code. 
Pay attention. This is the last time we are 
going to go over this. 

"Having a code requirement maintains 
the quality of amateur radio licensees, if 
we eliminate the code, ham radio wilt be- 
come like CB- "Anyone who has this opin- 
ion obviously hasn't spent any time on the 
bands lately. The goof balls on 14.313 
MHz. the illegal and shameful behavior of 
many trying to contact the Bo u vet Island 
DXpedition (or any even slightly rare DX 
spot, for that matter}, 10 meters during a 
contest weekend, AMers on 40 meters 
with 20 kHz band widths (I have nothing 
against AM. but I have a lot of proof ems 
with 20 kHz bandwldths) All of these 
folks (and these are but a few of dozens of 
examples) are licensed amateurs who 
have passed a code test. If you're a rude 
and obnoxious jerk, a code test is not go- 
ing to change that. If you're a courteous 
and thoughtful operator, the lack of a code 
test will not turn you into a net-jammer. 

"We must maintain the code require- 
ment because code gets through when 
other modes donX it f $ vital in times of 
emergency." This argument may have 
had some validity SO years ago. but with 
modern communication modes and 
equipment it is simply no longer true. You 
can put up a dipole, pump less than 100 
watts of packet into it and get an error-free 
message, anywhere in the world deliv- 
ered in less than 24 hours And you don't 
even have to be in your snack to do it. You 
coufd send a message lo yourself before 
you got on a plane from Mew York to Los 
Angeles, and the message would be wait- 
ing for you before your plane landed It I 
had an important message to send. CW is 
the last mode I would choose, tt's slow, 
inefficient and more prone to operate* er- 
ror man any other mode. 

"Morse code is a radio tradition that 
should be saved I IVs a useful skill that all 
radio operators should know /'This is the 
dumbest argument yet. but you'd be sur- 



prised how man y times I ' ve heard it Being 
able to shoe a horse is a useful skill, but I 
don't think it should he a requirement for 
obtaining a driver's license. 

"The no-code license was pushed 
through the FCC by the mafor equipment 
manufacturers, so they could make mil- 
lions of dollars in new equipment safes. " 
Oh, how I wish this were the case. I have a 
vary large streak of 1960s' "angry young 
man" in me, and this kind of a scandal 
would be perfect. Unfortunately, it just 
isn't true, t speak with the marketing man- 
agers of every major amateur equipment 
m an ufact u rer on a reg u lar basis— some of 
them I consider friends — and not once has 
a n y of them even b roug h t u p t h e subject of 
no-code. For most of these companies, 
amateur radio is a small sideline to their 
commercial electronics business, They 
are not sitti ng arou nd waiting to make rheir 
fortunes off of amateur radio. The only 
people getting rich off of amateur radio are 
IheARRL (sorry, . . I couldn't resist). 

"Unless you give these no-code Techni- 
cians spectal cailstgns. how can we make 
sure they're not operating illegally 7 "Boy. 
the dopiness just keeps on comm" , I have 
a 1 x 3 callsign. If you hear me calling 
"CQ' ' on 1 5 meter SSB, how do you know 
that I'm not a Technician? You can look 
me up in the Calf book, but that informa- 
tion is at least four months old, t could 
have upgraded since the last edition was 
published. How do we know that any of us 
are realty licensed lo be transmitting 
where we do? I'm sure that hundreds of 
amateurs operate out of their allocated 
frequency privileges, I've even heard a 
Tew that I KNOW were operating illegally. 
So what? Most amateurs are like you and 
me. They respect the FCC regulations and 
operate according to their license class 
Does passing a code test guarantee that 
you will only operate within your assigned 
frequency limits? No, of course not, 

When you come across someone on 
your local repeater, or wnen the regular 
group of crotchety old farts on 40m starts 
up agarn about no-code, please do us all a 
favor and tell them lo shut up, Amateur 
radio has changed. The rule passed. The 
no-code license is here. Get over It, 

I've received dozens of letters from no- 
code licensees. Some have told stories of 
Iriendty local hams, welcoming them to 
the hobby. Others have had stories of rude 
and obnoxious idiots refusing to talk to 
them because they haven't passed a code 
test (no great loss— these dopes aren't 
worth talking to anyway}, Most of these 
new licensees have mentioned that they 
are continuing to study the code, so they 
can get on HF. 

Those of you who were around when 1 he 
Novice license was first instituted will see 
a big similarity. Novices were shunned. 
The Novice class was going to be the 
demise of amateur radio. The same thing 
happened with Novice enhancement. Let- 
ting the Novices on 10m was going to be 
the end of amateur radio, Hell. I he same 
thing happened when SSB was intro- 
duced, . or 2m repealers., or pick any 
change since the days of spark gap 

How you or 1 feel aboui no-code is a 
mute point. It happened. It's done. Now. 
let's all move forward and Stan addressing 
the real problems in amateur radio. If you 
Insist on clinging to this non issue, then 
the least you can do Is keep it to your- 
self. The rest of us have more important 
things I o do 



88 73 Amateur Radio Today • June, 1991 




Number 34 on your Feedback card 



RO PAG AT ION 



ALASKA 



• -.---. • 



EMJUWQ 



HAWAII 



INDIA 



JAPAN 



Mexico 



Jim Gray W1XU 
210 E. Chateau Circle 
PaysonAZ 85541 

Not Great, But Not Bad 

Overall, June will be a fair month for 
DX, but not as spectacular as spring 
and fall. Sun spot Cycle 22 has begun 
to decline from Its estimated peak in 
June 19B9, and is now in its second 
downward year of an approximately 
six-year period when the sunspot mini- 
mum is expected (1995-96). DX will 
continue to be good to fair for 
the next couple of years, but 
you 11 need more skill and in- 
formalkm to maximize your 
success because opportune 
ties will be fewer and farther 
between. 

June always centers on the 
"DX Doldrums" because it 
marks the summer solstice, 
halfway between the spring 
and fail equinoxes when OX 
is best. The higher summer 
sun angle in the Northern 
Hemisphere heats the F2 lay- 
er, reducing ionization of the 
upper atmosphere. With the 
atmospheric noise levels and 
reduced ionization, DX oppor- 
tunities are consequently re- 
duced. 

Although daytime DX will 
generally be poorer in June 
compared to winter late 
evening DX may be better be* 
cause of the longer hours of 
daylight. There are also VHF/ 
UHF possibilities in June* and 
it's a good idea to look for sud- 
den ionospheric and atmo- 
spheric disturbances that can 
promote them. 

The expected poor days for 
this month will center around 
the 1 1 Iti and the 22nd. The rest 
of June is expected to have 
poor to fair DX propagation 
conditions; fc»u1 don't expect 
the results you get in spring 
and fall. 

The charts may be used in 



Jim Gray W1XU 

two ways; To find an appropriate time 
and band to work the countries you 
need, or to lake advantage of the oper- 
ating hours you have available, and 
work those countries most likely to be 
open at those times. Then, consulting 
the daily calendar forecast, you can 
choose the days most likely to be best 
for success. 

For more information about short- 
wave radio propagation, I recommend 
I he Shortwave Propagation Hand' 
book, by Jacobs and Cohen. 



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first mixer similar to the FT-1000. 

• Dual Digital Switched Capacitance 
Filter: The FT-990 is the only HF 

transceiver to feature a SCF with 
independent hi/lo-cui controls 
for skirt selectivity providing 
unmatched audio reception as never 
before attained, 

• Built-in Comenience: Unlike the 
competition's extras the FT-990 
was designed as a true self- 
contained base station. A switching 
AC power supply is built-in. 



• CPU Controlled RF FSP ( RF 
Frequency-Shifted Speech Pn*eessor>: 

The RF FSP shifts the SSB carrier 
point by programming a CPU to 
change audio frequency response 
and provide optimum speech pro- 
cessing effect, 

• Dual- VFO's with Direct Digital 
Synthesis < DPS i 

• Full and Semi Break-in CW 
Operation 

• 6 Function Multimeter 

• Adjustable RF Power 

• Adjustable Level Noise Blanker 

• 90 Memories 

• Mult imode Selection on locket/ 
RTTY 

• Front Piinel RX Antenna Selection 




Digital Voice Storage D VS-2 

( Xption 

Band Stacking \TO System 

Accessories/Options: TCXO-2 
(Temperature Compensated Crystal 
Oscillator). XF-10.9M-2024M (2nd 
IF SSB Narrow 2.0kHz), XF-445C- 
251-01 (3rd IF CW Narrow 250Hz), 
SP-6 (External Speaker), MD1C8 
(Desk Microphone)- YH-77ST 
( Headphones), LL-5 (Phone Patch 
Module), 




Performance without compromise. 5 " 

© t991 >5aesu USA, 17210 Edwards Road. Cerritos. CA 90701 
Specifications subject to change without notice 

Specifications guaranteed only within amateur bands 




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TH-77A 

Compact 2m/70cm Dual 
Band HT 

Here's a radio that deserves a 
double-take! The TH-77A is a 
feature-packed dual band radio 
compressed into an HT package. 
The accessories are compatible 
wtth 0^1^-75,1^-25, and TH-26 
Series radios. Repeater and remote 
base users will appreciate the DTMF 
memory that can store all of the 
DTMF characters (\ #, A, B, C, and D) 
that are usually required for 
repeater functions! 

• Wide band receiver coverage. 
136-165 (118-165 [AM mode 
118-136] MHz after modification) and 
438-449.995 MHz. TX on Amateur 
bands only. (Two meter section is 
modifiable for MARS/CAR Permits 
required.) 

• Dual receive/dual LCD display. 
Separate volume and squelch con- 
trots for each band. Audio output can 
be mixed or separated by using an 
external speaker 



• Cross band repeat function. 

• Dual Tone Squelch System (DTSS). 
Uses standard DTMF to open 
squelch. 

• CTCSS encode/decode built-in. 

• Forty-two memory channels. 

All channels odd split capable 

• DTMF memory/autodiaier. 
Ten 15-digit codes can be stored. 

• Direct keyboard frequency entry. 
The rotary dial can also be used 

to select memory, frequency, 
frequency step, CTCSS, and scan 
direction. 

• Multi-function, dual scanning. Time 
or carrier operated channel or band 
scanning. 

• Frequency step selectable for 
quick QSY Choose from 5, 10, 1Z5 P 
15 f 20, or 25 kHz steps. 

• Two watts (15 W on UHF) with 
supplied battery pack. Five watts 
output with PB-8 battery pack or 
13.8 volts. Low power is 500 mW 

• DC direct-in operation from 6.3-16 
VDC with the PG-2W 

• T-Alert with elapsed time indicator 

• Automatic repeater offset on 2 m, 

• Battery-saving features. 

Auto battery saver, auto power off 
function, and economy power mode. 



Complete service manuals are available tor ail Kenwood transceivers and most accessories 
Specifications and features are subject to change Without notice or obligation. 



• Supplied accessories: 

Flex antenna, PB-6 battery pack 
(7.2 V P 600 mAH), wall charger, belt 
hook, wrist strap, keyboard cover 

Optional accessories: 

• BC-1Q: Compact charger • BC-fl: Rapid 
charger* BH-6: Swivel mount • BT~6: AAA 
battery case* DC-1/PG-2V: DC adapter 

• DC-4: Mobile charger for PB-10 * DC-5: 
Mobile charger for PB-6, 7, 9 * PB-5: 72 V ( 
200 m Ah NiCd pack for 2.5 W output 

• PB-6: 7.2 V f 600 mAh NiCd pack * PB-7: 
7.2 V, 1100 mAh NiCd pack • PB-8: 12 V, 
600 mAh NiCd for 5 W output * PB-9: 

72 V, 600 mAh NiCd with buittHn charger 

• PB-fl: 12 V, 600 mAh OR 6 V, 1200 mAh, 
for 5 W OR 2 W • HMC-2: Headset with 
VOX and PTT ■ PG-2W: DC cable w/fuse 

• PG-3F: DC cable with filter and cigarette 
lighter plug * SC-28, 29: Soft case 

■ SMC-30/31: Speaker mics, • SMC-33: 
Speaker mic. w/remote control * WR-1 : 
Water resistant bag. 

KENWOOD US. A. CORPORATION 

COMMUNICATIONS & TEST EQUIPMENT GROUP 

P.0, BOX 22745, 2201 E, Dominguez Street 
Long Beach, CA 90801-5745 

KENWOOD ELECTRONICS CANADA INC 

P.O. BOX 1075. 959 Gana Court 
Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L4T 4C2 

KENWOOD 

. . . pacesetter in Amateur Radio